Monthly Archives: August 2017

escape, atemi and awareness

escape, atemi and awareness

We live in a world that delivers increasing violence against women and children, and others who are vulnerable.  Consider the concepts of “self-defense, escape, atemi and awareness for children, women and elders”.  Each of the links below, especially the first three, offer valuable information, tips, advice, insights, books, videos and DVDs. 

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http://www.functionalselfdefense.org/awareness-prevention 

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http://attackproof.com/10-best-self-defense-tips.html 

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http://thinklikeablackbelt.com/blog/self-defense-for-kids-made-easier-with-a-game/ 

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http://www.ncdsv.org/images/SelfDefenseinfo_LACAAW.pdf 

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http://www.azplayitsafedefense.com/women-teens/ 

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http://femaleawareness.com/ 

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http://www.crimesurvivors.org/page/programs/self-defense-and-safety-classes/ 

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http://www.safeinsight.net/uploads/4/9/3/3/49337147/s132004858298100905_p83_i9_w579.jpeg

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Use the phrase “self-defense, escape, atemi and awareness for children, women and elders” to search YouTube for videos and your local ccommunityfor classes. 

I recommend simple class attendance with some practice component over self-teaching and watching videos. This is apart from any formal enrollment in a martial arts class of any genre, and apart from owning a firearm. 

The first component in preparedness is to hone your own skills in self-awareness, mindfulness and situation awareness. 

I consider mastery of these mandatory before the acquisition and use of a firearm.

Beyond that, make sure you have an outstanding flashlight (my family is outfitted with rechargeable BlazeRay LED), a loud whistle, and other small, legal and portable items kept on or near your person.

Atemi is a Japanese word that, in Japanese martial arts including aikido, uses techniques including percussive body strikes, often simply soft blows, that are often used “to briefly break an opponent’s balance (see kuzushi) or resolve”; with such a “blow to an area such as the eyes, face, or some vulnerable part of the abdomen…  the opponent can be distracted, and may instinctively contort their body (e.g., jerking their head back from a face strike) in such a way that they lose their balance”, allowing the individual under attack that prolonged but brief moment in which to regain their own footing, balance, and wherewithal to escape and call for help. 

If you or your child can be brought to a visceral understanding of learning how to remain calm in the face of a sudden storm of terror… 

sit stay

sit stay

“… The Essential Phone ships September 1, starting at $699. You can buy it subsidized from Sprint, or unlocked from Amazon and elsewhere. (You should buy it unlocked.) It is the first in a line of products that Essential believes will bring innovation back to the smartphone market and give people a brand to love in the same way millions love Apple.

In some ways, the Essential Phone appears genuinely exciting and new. In most, it just feels like a really good smartphone. And in a few frustrating ways, it’s not yet good enough…..”

https://www.wired.com/2017/08/review-essential-phone/ 

[But will it sync with my MAC OS?]

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“… Technology is going faster and faster and ethical and moral debates aren’t occurring at the same rhythm. We need to be ready for a speed of innovation that we can’t control. I’m concerned, and you should be too. Should we, as a social being, force ourselves to slow down? Is that even possible?….

Brilliant and Exciting but Scary Technologies

BEST, for short (I’ve always wanted to invent an acronym). What could be so brilliant and exciting that also makes it pretty freaking scary? There are several technologies that many people can’t stop speaking about saying they are “the next big thing”:

AI

Virtual Reality

Bio Revolution

Brain Computer Interface

Conquering Space

They do sound pretty cool, but in case you’re not convinced, let me tell you what’s going on with each one of them and where they’re heading…..”

https://blog.albertoelias.me/is-technology-outpacing-human-development-we-need-to-talk-12a4f98b2a50 

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wXU93BnLhbw

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http://www.techrepublic.com/resource-library/whitepapers/how-to-build-a-successful-career-in-cybersecurity-free-pdf/ 

http://www.zdnet.com/article/ai-will-create-800000-jobs-and-1-1-trillion-revenue-by-2021-salesforce/ 

http://www.zdnet.com/article/the-future-of-jobs-automation-technologies-robotics-and-artificial-intelligence/ 

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Last week, the household experienced a traumatic event, albeit a natural one.  A blue heron found our koi pond.  The greater regional area is dappled with small ponds, streams, swampland and, naturally, it all becomes a habitat for them.  

The local koi supply and pond industry says such events cannot be avoided, only minimized; they suggest the use of decoys, and nets.  

We didn’t have the net in place, but one friend had given us a decoy statuette of a pelican. 

After the blue heron was spotted for the first time, my wife ran out and bought an expensive heron decoy.  The blue heron returned, flew in to stand next to the decoy, and tapped it with its beak. 

“Yes, I thought you were rather immobile; these people must think I’m stupid.”

People and dogs shooed the heron away but the game was on; it circled the neighborhood and sampled from several koi ponds in the area.  The surving koi hid under the rocks in deep water and did not come out for days; even now they are reticent, but they do get hungry once a week. 

The neighbor with the other koi pond brought out his BB rifle (useless), his pellet pistol (somewhat effective at letting the bird know there was a predator nearby), and his paintball gun. 

When last seen, the heron had matching bright orange spots on his wings.

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Book report:

46 Books have been completely re-annotated 

26 Books have not been annotated

3 Books need to be read and annotated

6 Books have not been read and may not be of value

The timeline has yet to be developed, and it needs to be integrated with that of my life. 

The remaining 26 books will be easily and quickly annotated, and then the real deep fun begins: building the timeline, developing the order and outline, and writing. 

And then editing. 

And re-editing. 

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For the past several weeks, the household has been engaged in nurturing a new furry “son”; a young neutered male of six months was rescued from a local shelter who had received it from a designer hybrid puppy mill in a state that does not require neutering.  

He’s a Labrador retriever/American foxhound who will be a big boy and with whom we are deeply-engaged in obedience school. 

We named him Remy, after the Red Sox broadcaster (RemDawg) currently on medical leave for his fifth battle with lung cancer.  It’s essentially my wife’s dog, and my wife is a huge Red Sox fan and won two bouts with cancer herself. 

MLB is currently tinkering with the game of baseball to make it more attractive, a disastrous interference in my opinion, and perhaps Jerry’s; he’s has already been verbally spanked for his comment about banning translators from mound visits; he’s the author of an outstanding book on how to watch the game. 

We’ve been watching the game on TV and live (both of our kids were stars on the diamond) for decades.

Now we are learning to translate dog barks. And the four-legged RemDawg is now showing his hound sounds too. He chews through his harnesses and leashs, our bone and biscuit budget is waaay up, and he has an annoying habit of nipping at the hands and legs of Mrs. Blogger. The “coins in the can” trick and running the vaccum cleaner stops the incessant barking.  We’re learning too…

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“… People have been trying to parse how dogs and people communicate with each other for a long time. Obviously they do—but hypothetically the form and content go way beyond sit and stay—and say something broader about language and animal cognition…..”

https://www.wired.com/story/what-a-border-collie-taught-a-linguist-about-language/?mbid=nl_81817_p2&CNDID=46211781 

[Ed.: We might learn something about social engineering while we’re doing it, too. Did you see that ad on Wired for how to expand your focus group research? ]

task at hand

task at hand

The Ultimate Medical Kit

via

http://www.strike-the-root.com 

Part One

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t3qLk9VXMr0&t=178s

Part Two

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bIkze84k-bQ 

Part Three

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GwUpLYWZh1c 

 

[I haven’t watched these but I am a big believer in getting people to learn as much as possible about taking care of their bodies and each other that I believe you can select out (or in) those elements and items that will work for you where ever you are. 

I was an EMT and EMT instructor a very long time ago and, during that process, the best decision I ever made was to marry a trauma nurse. 

She became a certified case manager who’s been managing my case for a long time now, with time out for having and raising two kids who are now professionals raising their own kids.  She spent hours today training our new Labrador retriever/hound puppy who, at age six months, stands 30 inches high. He is already proven to be a good watch, alert & protect dog.]

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http://themindunleashed.com/2017/07/neuroscience-drumming-researchers-discover-secrets-drumming-human-brain.html 

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http://lumpyridgepress.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/11/A-Large-Task-at-Hand.jpg 

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Ed.: As noted the other day in Occurrences, I am curently re-reading Daniel Estulin’s book on the worldwide center for brainwashing and social engineering and I highly recommend you read and heed his words.  

From page 1: “We can all perceive disintegration of our nations in terms of day to day, personal experiences…. [The] moral, material, cultural and intellectual decay that we are witnessing helplessly every day across the globe is not accidental …. but a deliberately-induced social crisis….”

Then there are the sections on television and cybernetics… deeply-depressing stuff, but enough to get folks away from the screens, enjoying and celebrating friends, family, pets, and life.

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https://jonrappoport.wordpress.com/2017/08/01/notes-on-covert-information-ops/ 

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https://activerain-store.s3.amazonaws.com/image_store/uploads/6/3/7/2/9/ar129715976692736.jpg 

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 Ed.: Progress, albeit slow, is being made on the book. Two new sources have been added, one of which is being read now, and slowly I am annotating stuff I’ve read before, stuff I bought and set aside for reading, and more. 

39 Books have been fully annotated and re-shelved

31 Books have not been annotated

3 Books need to be read and annotated

6 Books have not been read and may not be of value

1 book has not yet arrived

1 book has not yet been ordered

I’ve done enough highlighting that I had to go out and buy two more of the yellow things today. 

[Would some one please package them in a square tube format so they won’t roll off tables when you put them down?]

And I think I just discovered the tool and technique that will allow me to boil all that down into a detailed and focused read for an audience that could stretch out and last across decades and  generations.

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There is a five-part condensation of performance psychology which you can adapt to anything that is in your future, and it goes like this.

First, set your goals.  This is a choice as to whether you will focus on outcome goals, or process goals. Everyone wants the best outcome, of course, but the way to the best outcome over the long haul is to focus on your process goals, in other words, those things that you will want or have to do to achieve the outcome you want. Surely you can practice more, work harder, etc etc., but presumably you have been doing those things all along. Your goals should be immediate, short-term, positive, achievable (but challenging), time-limited, measurable, flexible and adaptable. The ancient Chinese wisdom about moving mountains a few rocks at a time still applies. Crisp and renewed clarity of intent is critical.

Relaxation is a major element.  For athletic or movement-related items (these can include dance, music etc.), use progressive muscle relaxation (active and passive). Stretch; stay loose. Relaxation techniques can also include some for of autogenic training, meditative-based approaches, body scanning, mindfulness and breathing.  Knowing how to maintain a consistent approach to deep and relaxing breathing as you go through your event is a key.

Self-talk is critical, using affirmations, cue words, reframing your thoughts, and using the STOP technique when you find your thoughts straying away in the wrong direction. If you tell your sub-conscious “I am the ____”, soon enough you will be the ____.

Imagery, especially when combined with self-talk, is equally critical.  Used in learning and skill acquistion, for mental preparation and rehearsal, for reinforcement and correction, the use of imagery involves vividness, duration, ease, control and can also include auditory cues.

Lastly, concentration on the task at hand is the tip of your performance psychology spear.

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[For Jimiray , wherever he is]

HARVARD STUDY: BIG PHARMA, US GOV. BEHIND OPIOID EPIDEMIC

A new Harvard study reveals how Big Pharma and federal government have colluded to allow the current opioid epidemic in the United States. 

The study, entitled The Opioid Epidemic: Fixing a Broken Pharmaceutical Market, describes how the American public have been duped by the elites for more than 20 years.

“In this article, we argue that non-rigorous patenting standards and ineffectual policing of both fraudulent marketing and anticompetitive actions played an important role in launching and prolonging the opioid epidemic. We further show that these regulatory issues are not unique to prescription opioids but rather are reflective of the wider pharmaceutical market.”

Thefreethoughtproject.com reports: Researchers follow with a primer on the rise of opioid prescriptions and how pain became “the fifth vital sign.” By the 1990s, doctors realized that chronic pain was often ignored, and pain management became a hot topic. Physicians were urged to make greater use of opioids, with experts in the field downplaying the potential for misuse and addiction – a view largely based on experience with morphine.

But this was before OxyContin came along.

Purdue Pharma, recognizing that this newfound view of the medical establishment could be exploited, worked to develop an improved synthetic opioid. Their golden ticket was found with the extended-release oxycodone pill known as OxyContin, patented and approved by the FDA in 1995.

However, Purdue’s exclusive patent was based on corporate fraud and government ignorance.

“Purdue was able to patent extended-release oxycodone in the United States despite the fact that its constituent elements—the active ingredient oxycodone and the controlled-release system Contin—had been developed decades earlier…Oxycodone was used in clinical practice in Germany as early as 1917, and was first introduced in the United States in 1939.”

Purdue’s angle was to develop a controlled-release version of oxycodone, banking on its success with the patented MS Contin for morphine. Here’s where the feds stepped in to help.

The United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) initially rejected Purdue’s patent request for extended-release oxycodone, citing the combination as “obvious.” But Purdue responded with a statistical falsehood – which the company knew was false – and the patent office made an about-face, granting the 20 year patent for OxyContin.

Since then, the cozy relationship between Big Pharma and government has grown, with the pharma industry spending almost a billion dollars in ten years on lobbying federal and state governments and campaign contributions.

As the Harvard study notes, “low patenting standards” and “a history of tepid enforcement” provided incentive for Purdue to embark on a massive, fraudulent marketing campaign. With the guarantee of no competition provided by government, Purdue spent obscene amounts of money getting American hooked on their newly-patented product.

“Between 1996 and 2000, the company more than doubled its U.S. marketing team…In 2001, Purdue paid forty million dollars in bonuses tied to extended-release oxycodone…Purdue also invested heavily in analytics, developing a database to identify high-volume prescribers and pharmacies to help focus their marketing resources…Patients were offered starter coupons for a free initial supply of extended-release oxycodone, 34,000 of which were redeemed by 2001…Finally, Purdue hosted forty all-expenses-paid pain management and speaker training conferences at lavish resorts. Over five thousand clinicians attended, receiving toys, fishing hats, and compact discs while listening to sales representatives tout the alleged benefits of extended-release oxycodone…Purdue elevated the stakes, spending an estimated six to twelve times more promoting extended-release oxycodone than its competitor Janssen spent marketing a rival opioid…

Purdue’s efforts paid off. Between 1996 and 2001, extended-release oxycodone generated $2.8 billion in sales. From 2008 to 2014, annual sales exceeded $2 billion.”

It gets even worse.

As the patent expiration for OxyContin approached, Purdue developed an “abuse-deterrent formulation” of the drug, for which FDA granted a patent in 2010. Not satisfied with a simple new patent, Purdue filed a “citizen petition asking the FDA to refuse to accept generic versions of the original extended-release oxycodone formulation on safety grounds.” Incredibly, FDA also granted this to Purdue, “effectively preventing the marketing of low-cost, therapeutically equivalent products that might undercut Purdue’s incentive to continue to widely promote its new abuse-deterrent formulation.”

By the way, the “abuse-deterrent” OxyContin doesn’t really deter addicts, and it has fueled the explosive heroin epidemic as addicts seek out cheaper, black market alternatives. But Purdue is content making its billions off the patented drug.

While thousands of Americans die under a campaign of deception and greed, official Washington pretends to care with the occasional fine levied against pharma companies, including for false marketing by Purdue.

But no one ever goes to jail; no one in top management is ever held to account. The persons in “personhood” conveniently disappear when corporations get in trouble. And the fines? Mere pocket change compared to the revenues already made from the drugs involved.

“Rather than deterring fraudulent marketing, the penalties simply became a cost of doing business.”

The Harvard study provides much more insight into the fraudulent marketing practices of Big Pharma, the patent schemes enabled by federal government, how generic drugs are routinely stifled, and possible ways to address the injustice.

Some of the more sinister effects of the system include “hard switches” which force patients to go from one costly patented drug to another instead of generics. The use of “citizen petitions” by pharma corporations to slow generic drugs and keep prices high is a particularly insidious scheme.

The study notes that today, “Over four million Americans misuse opioids each month” at a societal cost of $80 billion annually. 300 million prescriptions were written in 2015 in the U.S., which has a population of 323 million. This is reflected in the fact that 80 percent of the world’s opioids are consumed in the U.S., which has 5 percent of the world’s population.

The misuse of opioids is a not a simple issue, and personal choice is of course involved. But the above numbers point to something much bigger going on.

As the Harvard study confirms, Big Pharma has exploited the enormous addiction potential of opioids to prey upon the American populace for decades — made possible by a federal government with blatant disregard for the well-being of citizens.