Tag Archives: AI

sit stay

sit stay

“… The Essential Phone ships September 1, starting at $699. You can buy it subsidized from Sprint, or unlocked from Amazon and elsewhere. (You should buy it unlocked.) It is the first in a line of products that Essential believes will bring innovation back to the smartphone market and give people a brand to love in the same way millions love Apple.

In some ways, the Essential Phone appears genuinely exciting and new. In most, it just feels like a really good smartphone. And in a few frustrating ways, it’s not yet good enough…..”

https://www.wired.com/2017/08/review-essential-phone/ 

[But will it sync with my MAC OS?]

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“… Technology is going faster and faster and ethical and moral debates aren’t occurring at the same rhythm. We need to be ready for a speed of innovation that we can’t control. I’m concerned, and you should be too. Should we, as a social being, force ourselves to slow down? Is that even possible?….

Brilliant and Exciting but Scary Technologies

BEST, for short (I’ve always wanted to invent an acronym). What could be so brilliant and exciting that also makes it pretty freaking scary? There are several technologies that many people can’t stop speaking about saying they are “the next big thing”:

AI

Virtual Reality

Bio Revolution

Brain Computer Interface

Conquering Space

They do sound pretty cool, but in case you’re not convinced, let me tell you what’s going on with each one of them and where they’re heading…..”

https://blog.albertoelias.me/is-technology-outpacing-human-development-we-need-to-talk-12a4f98b2a50 

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wXU93BnLhbw

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http://www.techrepublic.com/resource-library/whitepapers/how-to-build-a-successful-career-in-cybersecurity-free-pdf/ 

http://www.zdnet.com/article/ai-will-create-800000-jobs-and-1-1-trillion-revenue-by-2021-salesforce/ 

http://www.zdnet.com/article/the-future-of-jobs-automation-technologies-robotics-and-artificial-intelligence/ 

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Last week, the household experienced a traumatic event, albeit a natural one.  A blue heron found our koi pond.  The greater regional area is dappled with small ponds, streams, swampland and, naturally, it all becomes a habitat for them.  

The local koi supply and pond industry says such events cannot be avoided, only minimized; they suggest the use of decoys, and nets.  

We didn’t have the net in place, but one friend had given us a decoy statuette of a pelican. 

After the blue heron was spotted for the first time, my wife ran out and bought an expensive heron decoy.  The blue heron returned, flew in to stand next to the decoy, and tapped it with its beak. 

“Yes, I thought you were rather immobile; these people must think I’m stupid.”

People and dogs shooed the heron away but the game was on; it circled the neighborhood and sampled from several koi ponds in the area.  The surving koi hid under the rocks in deep water and did not come out for days; even now they are reticent, but they do get hungry once a week. 

The neighbor with the other koi pond brought out his BB rifle (useless), his pellet pistol (somewhat effective at letting the bird know there was a predator nearby), and his paintball gun. 

When last seen, the heron had matching bright orange spots on his wings.

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Book report:

46 Books have been completely re-annotated 

26 Books have not been annotated

3 Books need to be read and annotated

6 Books have not been read and may not be of value

The timeline has yet to be developed, and it needs to be integrated with that of my life. 

The remaining 26 books will be easily and quickly annotated, and then the real deep fun begins: building the timeline, developing the order and outline, and writing. 

And then editing. 

And re-editing. 

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For the past several weeks, the household has been engaged in nurturing a new furry “son”; a young neutered male of six months was rescued from a local shelter who had received it from a designer hybrid puppy mill in a state that does not require neutering.  

He’s a Labrador retriever/American foxhound who will be a big boy and with whom we are deeply-engaged in obedience school. 

We named him Remy, after the Red Sox broadcaster (RemDawg) currently on medical leave for his fifth battle with lung cancer.  It’s essentially my wife’s dog, and my wife is a huge Red Sox fan and won two bouts with cancer herself. 

MLB is currently tinkering with the game of baseball to make it more attractive, a disastrous interference in my opinion, and perhaps Jerry’s; he’s has already been verbally spanked for his comment about banning translators from mound visits; he’s the author of an outstanding book on how to watch the game. 

We’ve been watching the game on TV and live (both of our kids were stars on the diamond) for decades.

Now we are learning to translate dog barks. And the four-legged RemDawg is now showing his hound sounds too. He chews through his harnesses and leashs, our bone and biscuit budget is waaay up, and he has an annoying habit of nipping at the hands and legs of Mrs. Blogger. The “coins in the can” trick and running the vaccum cleaner stops the incessant barking.  We’re learning too…

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“… People have been trying to parse how dogs and people communicate with each other for a long time. Obviously they do—but hypothetically the form and content go way beyond sit and stay—and say something broader about language and animal cognition…..”

https://www.wired.com/story/what-a-border-collie-taught-a-linguist-about-language/?mbid=nl_81817_p2&CNDID=46211781 

[Ed.: We might learn something about social engineering while we’re doing it, too. Did you see that ad on Wired for how to expand your focus group research? ]

Robots and Artificial Intelligence

Starwood Hotels Trials Robots That Make Deliveries to Guests

August 12th, 2014

Via: CNBC:

Look out Rosie the Robot, Starwood Hotels’ Aloft brand has a taskmaster of its own.

His (or her?) name; A.L.O. pronounced “el-oh”, the hotels’ first Botlr (short of robotic butler.) Standing just under 3 feet tall, A.L.O. comes dressed in a vinyl-collared butler uniform and will soon be on call all day and night to fulfill requests from guests.

Forget your toothpaste? Need more towels? How about a late-night chocolate bar? All guests of the hotel have to do is call the front desk, where staff will load up the Botlr with requested items, punch in the guest’s room number and send it off to make the delivery, navigating hallways and even call for the elevator using Wi-Fi.

Posted in Economy, Rise of the Machines, Technology

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Here’s an idea for an awesome dogfighting aircraft. Make it small, light, and fast. Build it out of materials that are hard to detect on radar. Even give it a laser cannon.

Oh, and don’t put a human in the cockpit. In fact, don’t even closely tie the drone to human ground control. Because in an aerial knife fight, a computer-controlled machine will beat a human pilot.

That’s the idea behind a controversial proposal by U.S. Air Force captain Michael Byrnes, an experienced Predator and Reaper drone pilot. Byrnes is calling for the development of a robotic dogfighter, which he calls the FQ-X, that could blow manned fighters out of the sky.

“A tactically autonomous, machine-piloted aircraft … will bring new and unmatched lethality to air-to-air combat,” Byrnes writes in Air and Space Power Journal.

In Byrnes’ conception, machines have the edge in making the lightning-fast decisions necessary to win a close-quarters aerial battle. “Humans average 200 to 300 milliseconds to react to simple stimuli, but machines can select or synthesize and execute maneuvers, making millions of corrections in that same quarter of a second,” he writes.

Byrnes focuses on famed fighter pilot John Boyd’s classic observe-orient-decide-act decision cycle — the “OODA loop” — which predicts that victory in combat belongs to the warrior who can assess and respond to conditions fastest.

Like a fighter pilot trying to out-turn his opponent in a dogfight, the trick to OODA is quickly making the right decisions while your enemy is still trying to figure out what’s going on.

It’s a battle of wits in which computers are superior, according to Byrnes. “Every step in OODA that we can do, they will do better.”

Byrnes envisions a drone designed from the start to utilize the full potential of an unmanned dogfighter. The FQ-X would be constructed of advanced, difficult-to-detect “metamaterials.” It would have extremely powerful computers that could determine an enemy aircraft’s position from even the scantest of sensor data.

“The principle of ‘first look, first kill’ belongs to the aircraft with the most processing power and the best software to leverage it,” Byrnes writes.

The FQ-X would also have multispectral optics and computer vision software that would enable it to distinguish friendly from enemy aircraft. The drone would pack a laser or a cannon firing armor-piercing incendiary rounds.

To sweeten the robot’s victory, on-board machine-learning systems would analyze the encounter and transmit tips to other combat drones.

It should be pretty obvious we’re not talking about some plodding, prop-driven Predator drone being steered by humans sitting in a trailer in Nevada, but rather a fast- and high-flying robot jet that functions without much need for human guidance.

“With FQ-X, autonomy for the conduct of the engagement would return to the air vehicle to take advantage of its superior processing speed and reaction times,” Byrnes proposes.

But there’s a tension in robotic warfare between the machines’ incredible speed and lethality and we human beings’ natural desire for direct control. Inserting a man into the loop inevitably limits a drone’s potential.

Without human control, we effectively grant robots licenses to kill.

Byrnes suggests breaking a dogfighting drone’s actions into different phases, including searching, stalking, closure, capture, and kill. Operator control would vary with the phase. And in the heat of direct combat, when milliseconds matter, the robot calls most of the shots.

It’s a bold proposal — one the Air Force as a whole has showed little interest in pursuing. Only the Navy has openly discussed adding air-to-air missiles to jet-powered drones. Considering the bureaucratic resistance, Byrnes worries that the flying branch could eventually have no choice but to borrow dogfighting robot technology from the sea service.

“Aviators may dislike it, the public will question it, science fiction imagines harbingers of the Cylon apocalypse and we are uncertain about how to best utilize it within the context of a larger Air Force,” he writes.

“Nevertheless, the FQ-X concept is too dangerous to our current thinking to ignore forever.”

http://theweek.com/article/index/264769/this-laser-armed-drone-could-blow-fighter-jets-out-of-the-sky 

via

http://blacklistednews.com 

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Google search=robots+and+artificial+intelligence 

Google search=pros+and+cons+of+artificial+intelligence 

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New Watson-Style AI Called Viv Seeks To Be the First ‘Global Brain’

Posted by Soulskill on Tuesday August 12, 2014 @08:10PM

from the siri-why-does-my-cat-throw-up-so-much? dept.

paysonwelch sends this report from Wired on the next generation of consumer AI:

Google Now has a huge knowledge graph—you can ask questions like “Where was Abraham Lincoln born?” And it can name the city. You can also say, “What is the population?” of a city and it’ll bring up a chart and answer. But you cannot say, “What is the population of the city where Abraham Lincoln was born?” The system may have the data for both these components, but it has no ability to put them together, either to answer a query or to make a smart suggestion. Like Siri, it can’t do anything that coders haven’t explicitly programmed it to do.

Viv breaks through those constraints by generating its own code on the fly, no programmers required. Take a complicated command like “Give me a flight to Dallas with a seat that Shaq could fit in.” Viv will parse the sentence and then it will perform its best trick: automatically generating a quick, efficient program to link third-party sources of information together—say, Kayak, SeatGuru, and the NBA media guide—so it can identify available flights with lots of legroom.

Read the 40 comments

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Burger-flipping robot could ‘completely obviate’ the need for human employees

Are our jobs doomed? Report shows the potentially devastating effects of robots on the job market

28 jobs endangered by technology

Machines were going to usher in an age of wealth and enable humans to live in leisure. — RF

The New NSA-Funded Code Rolls All Programming Languages Into One

Twitter admits that as many as 23 million of its active users are actually bots

Links from RiceFarmer.blogspot.com

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http://www.strike-the-root.com/superintelligence 

Column by Glen Allport.

Exclusive to STR

Here’s a taste:

“… How long do we have? No one knows, in part because AI/ASI researchers are all over the globe in dozens of nations, and many efforts are being conducted in secrecy. Chillingly, much of the funding (perhaps the majority) is coming from military sources such as DARPA, with, one can only believe, the explicit intent to use machine intelligence to kill the enemy or to destroy the enemy’s infrastructure — which would, as we have sene in Iraq, kill thousands, millions, or (in, say, the United States or China) perhaps hundreds of millions of civilians. Another reason we can only guess at the time remaining in the Human Era is that for many types of thinking, machines are millions of times faster than humans and they never sleep. At the point where turning an AI into something a thousand times smarter than Einstein might take a human team decades, the AI itself might do the same job in minutes — and do it in the background, without people even noticing what was happening. We can say this with certainty: Time grows short…..”

 

Glen Allport co-authored The User’s Guide to OS/2 from Compute! Books and is the author of The Paradise Paradigm: On Creating a World of Compassion, Freedom, and Prosperity. He maintains paradise-paradigm.net. This is one in a series of columns on the human condition.

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http://www.oocities.org/unclepez/Bicentennial.jpg 

 

The slice by Gordon Allport noted above helps humanity keep the focus and phyxation on how Robin Williams died in perspective. 

 

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_q10Bmr9ssg (6:20)

 

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L_qfC3utQwI (2:05:02)

 

Isn’t it ironic that this film won the Oscar for Best Make-Up, and that it cost an estimated one hundred million to make the movie?

 

Andrew Martin… you can lose yourself. Everything. All boundaries. All time. That two bodies can become so mixed up, that you don’t know who’s who or what’s what. And just when the sweet confusion is so intense you think you’re gonna die… you kind of do. Leaving you alone in your separate body, but the one you love is still there. That’s a miracle. You can go to heaven and come back alive. You can go back anytime you want with the one you love.

Rupert Burns: And you want to experience that?

Andrew Martin: Oh, yes, please.

Andrew Martin: [Very fast] Two cannibals were eating a clown. One turns to the other and says “Does this taste funny to you?” How do you make a hanky dance? Put a little boogie in it! What is a brunette between two blondes? A translator! Do you know why blind people don’t like to sky-dive? It scares their dogs! A man with demensia is driving on the freeway. His wife calls him on the mobile phone and says “Sweetheart, I heard there’s someone driving the wrong way on the freeway.” He says “One? There’s hundreds!” What’s silent and smells like worms? Bird farts. It must have been an engineer who designed the human body. Who else would put a waste processing plant next to a recreation area? A woman goes into a doctor’s office, and the doctor says “Do you mind if I numb your breasts?” “Not at all.” *makes ‘motor-boating’ noise. “Num-num-num-num.”

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UPDATED Friday August 15th, 2914 with this additional tidbit

from Kevin @ Cryptogon:

The Kilobot Project: A Low Cost Scalable Robot System for Demonstrating Collective Behaviors

August 15th, 2014

Here’s one for your This-Will-End-Badly file folder.

Via: Harvard:

In current robotics research there is a vast body of work on algorithms and control methods for groups of decentralized cooperating robots, called a swarm or collective. These algorithms are generally meant to control collectives of hundreds or even thousands of robots; however, for reasons of cost, time, or complexity, they are generally validated in simulation only, or on a group of a few 10s of robots. To address this issue, we designed the Kilobot, a low-cost robot designed to make testing collective algorithms on hundreds or thousands (“kilos”) of robots accessible to robotics researchers. Each robot has the basic capabilities required for a swarm robot, but is made with low-cost parts, and is mostly assembled by an automated process. In addition, the system design allows a single user to easily and scalably operate a large Kilobot collective, such as programming, powering on, and charging all robots. systems.

We are now using the Kilobot swarm to investigate algorithms for robust collective behavior, such as collective transport, human-swarm interaction, and shape self-assembly, as well as new theory that links individual robot capabilities to acheivable swarm behaviors. See our publications and movies to learn more about this research.