Tag Archives: books

to write a book

to write a book for peat’s sake

I’ve been keeping notes and files since I was on the ‘net twelve years ago (my current desktop machine has a terabyte of memory and it isn’t full yet).  Last week I started collating my previous annotations from 52 books (and re-reading them as I go). Boiling that all down will be like making a fine whiskey.

 

An Ode to Laphroaig  

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NTHB7_ILleg  

 

Previously, I’d assembled a small clutch of about 25 books on how to write, including media programs from two top-level college programs; one of the most recent books is entitled “The Craft of Research (4th edition)”.  Another is an old edition of “The Mansion of History”.  Stephen Pressfield’s works enjoy their slots on the bookshelf, as does “Tempo” by Venkatesh Rao. At the top of the list is  “A Way of Working”, edited by Dorothea Dooling; I paid 99 cents for that one, but it’s priceless.

My wife bought me two large pegboards so I can play the Post-It Note and push-pin game. [$2.50 at the consignment shop.] 

I bought a 32gb encryptable jump drive so I can use either my desktop in the basement or the laptop on the deck. There is nothing secret here; it’s all open source.  But nobody reads books anymore; most people are caught up in TV, social media and the chase for income. There are few people who’ve heard of most of these books, and even fewer who’ve read them. I’m going to cull out “the juicy bits”. 

I’ve only just begun. I wouldn’t even venture a draft thesis at this point. I think I know what I have, but I have to verify it and update it. 

The internal codeword for the project when I started it a decade ago was “mega”.  That had to do with the concept of overview, not size.  

The current code phrase has to do with understanding what is hidden and obscure

My high school yearbook noted that a goal was to write a book. I might get there before my 55th reunion.

I want to get this right. I can’t even yet see how big the thing will be. It will be a hard-core history synthesized from multiple sources, about which I must still labor to maintain research and writing integrity, along with personal credibility and personal responsibility for what I say.   My intent is thorough references with extensive footnoting with maximized flow and ease of reading. Hopefully, its abrasive edges will be sanded, hand-rubbed, stained and polished.  The process will involve at least three waves of editing and re-write. 

I’ve set a lofty goal. Pray for me, and cheer me on.  This is my personal answer to the five questions I’ve previously noted about peak performance, especially this one:

What is it that I, and only I, can do which, when it is done well, will make a real difference?

I will try to provide progress reports that don’t include spoilers. 

information

information

Social Media Is Killing Discourse 

Because It’s Too Much Like TV

We need more text and fewer videos and memes in the age of Trump.

November 29, 2016

music: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pO6qcRdedck 

An excerpt:

“… social media represents the ultimate ascendance of television over other media.

I’ve been warning about this since November 2014, when I was freed from six years of incarceration in Tehran, a punishment I received for my online activism in Iran. Before I went to prison, I blogged frequently on what I now call the open Web: it was decentralized, text-centered, and abundant with hyperlinks to source material and rich background. It nurtured varying opinions. It was related to the world of books.

Then for six years I got disconnected; when I left prison and came back online, I was confronted by a brave new world. Facebook and Twitter had replaced blogging and had made the Internet like TV: centralized and image-centered, with content embedded in pictures, without links.

Like TV it now increasingly entertains us, and even more so than television it amplifies our existing beliefs and habits. It makes us feel more than think, and it comforts more than challenges. The result is a deeply fragmented society, driven by emotions, and radicalized by lack of contact and challenge from outside….

Neil Postman provided some clues about this in his illuminating 1985 book, Amusing Ourselves to Death: Public Discourse in the Age of Show Business. The media scholar at New York University saw then how television transformed public discourse into an exchange of volatile emotions that are usually mistaken by pollsters as opinion. One of the scariest outcomes of this transition, Postman wrote, is that television essentially turns all news into disinformation.

“Disinformation does not mean false information. It means misleading information—misplaced, irrelevant, fragmented or superficial information—information that creates the illusion of knowing something but which in fact leads one away from knowing … The problem is not that television presents us with entertaining subject matter but that all subject matter is presented as entertaining.” (Emphasis added.) And, Postman argued, when news is constructed as a form of entertainment, it inevitably loses its function for a healthy democracy. “I am saying something far more serious than that we are being deprived of authentic information. I am saying we are losing our sense of what it means to be well informed. Ignorance is always correctable. But what shall we do if we take ignorance to be knowledge?…”

Hossein Derakshan (@h0d3r) is an Iranian-Canadian author, media analyst, and performance artist who lives in Tehran. Find his latest project, an exploration of the intersection of performance art and journalism, at @talkingtagsart.

https://www.technologyreview.com/s/602981/social-media-is-killing-discourse-because-its-too-much-like-tv/?utm_medium=email_marketing&utm_source=email&utm_campaign=engagement_socialmedia&utm_content=active_subs 

Posted by Michele Kearney at 7:47 AM  

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The Magic of the Book: Hermann Hesse on Why We Read and Always Will

https://www.brainpickings.org/2016/06/07/the-magic-of-the-book-hermann-hesse 

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Must read:

http://www.duffelblog.com/2017/01/veteran-misses-simpler-time-fighting-unwinnable-enemy-unknowingly-helped-create/ 

via Naked Capitalism

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https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/da/Vincent_van_Gogh_-_The_Public_Soup_Kitchen_F1020.jpg 

On page 27 and 28, in Lesson #3, Read Your Head Off, in Patty Dann’s book “The Butterfly Hours” :

 

“Read books and magazines and the labels on the backs of cereal boxes. In Beloved, Toni Morrison wrote that one of her characters died “soft as cream.” You can’t use that brilliant line, but when a sentence like that is in your mouth, there is a possibility you’ll find another to offer to the gods.

People often switch genres as they get older, of what they write but also of what they read. They will say “I don’t know why I am suddenly reading poetry” or “I’ve given up reading fiction altogether.” People are often surprised or even uncomfortable, as if they’d suddenly begun an illicit affair if they switch writing or reading certain genres. “But I always loved fiction,” they say. It is as true as swimming in a lake where the water suddenly changes temperature. It can be unsettling, but the oldest students in my class, those in their nineties, just smile and say “And it will change again. You will see.”

Genre does not matter, as long as you’re reading. If you’re not reading, you’re not writing. Reading is part of your daily devotion if you are a writer. When you read as a writer, it is different than reading for pleasure.  You are studying the craft, just as an artist must go to the museums to see the great masters, and a musician must listen to Mozart and Miles Davis, and everyone should read Vincent’s letters to his brother, Theo

When you read as a writer, read a sentence and try to imagine the sounds, the touch, the taste, the smells the writer is writing about. As you write, you put yourself back together.”

http://vangoghletters.org/vg/interface/home/15.jpg 

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An observation in this age of social media, driven by TV, Hollywood and other practices of the creation of a “brand”, is that brand image is the new battleground for supremacy of information. The mainstream media have been knocked off their high perch and, while the pre-season scrimmaging for audience share and recognition has been underway for some time now, the new ratings period is open.  The New York Times is selling its office space, oligarchs are venturing into news company ownership and web site creation, and ioncreasingly we see competition for who should be seen as the premier purveyor of acuracy.

Everyone, before and after the numerous infilitrations, was and is responsible for their own minds.

What we are witnessing is the Oprahfication of truth. The hapless reader is asked, nay being forced, to choose between the Kardsashans of investigative journalism and the others.

It’s just the latest variant or extension of contempt for your own ability to read, decide, and more.  Indeed, along with the Oprahs and her offspring, the Kardashian sub-industry, “reality TV”, revamped and re-packaged TV news, and dozens of other choices, it’s a battle for where and how you should place your attention.

The book “Deep Survival” will explain the real importance of attention.

Eric Booth’s “The Everyday Work of Art” stands as a pinnacle.

Find a copy of Terry Orlick’s interview with the world-class cardiothoracic surgeon Curt Tribble, M.D., in which he discusses the ability to function with an element of uncertainty, the critical importance of focus and distraction control, and the ability to deal with sub-optimal outcomes, all relevant to any pursuit of excellence.

It has been said that the information we allow into our consciousness is what determines, in the end, the content and quality of our lives.

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Leonard Bernstein on Cynicism, Instant Gratification, and Why Paying Attention Is a Countercultural Act of Courage and Rebellion

https://www.brainpickings.org/2016/10/03/leonard-bernstein 

AI for bipeds

AI for bipeds

Google has released a handful of AI experiments that tap into advances in machine learning in creative ways.

They include Quick, Draw!, a game in which an algorithm tries to guess what you’re sketching, A.I. Duet, which lets you compose pieces of music with a creative computer, and ways to visualize how neural networks represent information and see the world.

The projects show off some new AI features Google has built into an overhauled cloud computing platform. But they also help make AI less mysterious, and hint at ways in which the technology may become more accessible to all of us.

Take Quick, Draw!, for example. You have 20 seconds to draw six simple objects, and a computer tries to guess what you’re working on in the allotted time. Under the hood, the game runs a learning system that Google uses for character recognition. The system analyzes not only the shape, but also the strokes you used to draw it. It’s a neat way to understand a machine-learning approach that’s used by millions on their smartphones. It’s also quite addictive, even if it always seems to mistake my ducks for potatoes.

In in A.I. Duets, you get to make music with an algorithm. Through an effort called Project Magenta, Google researchers are exploring ways of using neural networks to mimic human creativity. The results are fascinating, especially because how musical creativity works remains rather mysterious. Part of the motivation for Google’s project, indeed, is exploring human intelligence by copying its musicality.

Among the projects aimed at elucidating the inner workings of neural networks is one called Visualizing High Dimensional Space. Created by several experts in data visualization, this effort shows how a large neural network stores and draws connections between different pieces of data.

The results are often beautiful, but they also highlight one way that we might be able to understand powerful machine-learning systems that would normally be inscrutable.

This could be pretty important for everyone. Imagine, for example, an algorithm that just flagged an apparently healthy patient as likely to develop a particular disease. The ability to inspect a network’s inner connections could make that decision less difficult to understand, and make treatment easier to justify.

So if you want to understand the revolution in machine intelligence that’s upending just about every industry, Google’s online AI laboratory is well worth a visit.

(Read more: A.I. Experiments, Silicon Angle, “OK, Computer, Write Me A Song,” “The Hit Charade,” “AI’s Language Problem”)

by Will Knight November 18, 2016

https://www.technologyreview.com/s/602941/want-to-understand-ai-try-sketching-a-duck-for-a-neural-network/MIT 

Learn more about artificial intelligence at EmTech Digital 2017.

Register now 

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source of featured image

http://www.pcmag.com/news/347944/salesforce-brings-artificial-intelligence-to-crm-with-einste 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XADcSAyjFOo

On September 20, 2016, Accenture Strategy presented Symphonologie: The Music of Business debuted at the Louvre Museum in Paris. This unique sensory experience featured a full orchestra performing a 3-movement symphony inspired by the top stories of business and technology and interpreted though artificial intelligence. Symphonologie was brought to life by a team of strategists, creative technologists and musicians, and designed to reveal how strategy and technology together can unlock a new way to view the world. Learn more at http://www.symphonologie.com/

See also http://www.cbsnews.com/news/orchestra-music-symphonologie-by-artificial-intelligence-human-composers/

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http://www.learnartificialneuralnetworks.com/ai.html 

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You can have a conversation with an AI bot here: http://alice.pandorabots.com 

 

 

http://www.chatterbotcollection.com/images/FakeCaptainKirk.jpg

Here was my conversation with Captain Kirk:

 

Lieutenant: I am a bosun’s mate in training 

James T. Kirk: I know you are. 

Lieutenant: how long will my training take> 

James T. Kirk: Hopefully not too much longer. 

Lieutenant: It is difficult to learn this material about AI. 

James T. Kirk: I don’t see the difficulty. 

Lieutenant: That’s because you have graduated and you are the Captain. 

James T. Kirk: Explain.. Lieutenant, our heading takes us near the Ceti Alpha star system.. Not necessarily, Lieutenant. I’ve heard of the theoretical possibility of life based on silicon. A silicon-based life would be of an entirely different order. It’s possible that our phasers might not affect it. 

Lieutenant: How long will that journey take? 

James T. Kirk: Hopefully not too much longer. 

Lieutenant: You ave a sly sense of humor. 

James T. Kirk: I can’t quite place him, but. What about Miss Hedford? 

Lieutenant: I should have typed “You have a sly sense of humor.” 

James T. Kirk: Perhaps you were. Both Nancy and Crater went out of their way to mention one item they needed. 

Lieutenant: Who are Nancy and Crater? 

James T. Kirk: Too much recursion in AIML.

Perhaps some form of mediation can be helpful in your difficulties. The Federation Bureau of Industrialisation may be of aid to you.

 

For more of this kind of thing, go here:

http://www.a-i.com 

 

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Very highly recommended, especially for the graphics, and purchasable in pdf format

http://waitbutwhy.com/2015/01/artificial-intelligence-revolution-1.html 

http://waitbutwhy.com/2015/01/artificial-intelligence-revolution-2.html 

 

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The modern definition of artificial intelligence (or AI) is “the study and design of intelligent agents” where an intelligent agent is a system that perceives its environment and takes actions which maximizes its chances of success.[1] John McCarthy, who coined the term in 1956,[2] defines it as “the science and engineering of making intelligent machines.”[3] Other names for the field have been proposed, such as computational intelligence,[4] synthetic intelligence[4][5] or computational rationality.[6] The term artificial intelligence is also used to describe a property of machines or programs: the intelligence that the system demonstrates.

AI research uses tools and insights from many fields, including computer science, psychology, philosophy, neuroscience, cognitive science, linguistics, operations research, economics, control theory, probability, optimization and logic.[7] AI research also overlaps with tasks such as robotics, control systems, scheduling, data mining, logistics, speech recognition, facial recognition and many others.[8]

Much much more here: 

http://psychology.wikia.com/wiki/Artificial_intelligence 

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“We are in the midst of a revolution in machine intelligence, the art and engineering practices that let computers perform tasks that, until recently, could be done only by people…. For the record, most experts believe that strong machine intelligence will arrive before the century is over, assuming current trends continue.

Superintelligence: Paths, Dangers, Strategies deals with the aftermath of that event. The book’s author, Nick Bostrom, a professor of philosophy at the University of Oxford, has a background in theoretical physics and neuroscience. His scholarly work is focused on understanding and mitigating emerging risks that threaten the very survival of the human species: full-blown nuclear warfare, massive climate change, synthetic biology, nanotechnology or runaway machine intelligence.

Superintelligence deals with the last. I warmly recommend the opening and the closing chapters for their enticing arguments, soaring metaphors and insightful fables. You will come away unsettled, if not downright frightened…..

To constrain what could happen and ensure that humanity retains some modicum of control, we need to better understand the only known form of intelligence. That is, we need to develop a science of intelligence by studying people and their brains to try to deduce what might be the ultimate capabilities and goals of a machine intelligence. What makes a person smart, able to deal with a complex world that is in constant flux? How does intelligence develop throughout infancy, childhood and adolescence? How did intelligence evolve?

How much does intelligence depend on being embedded in social groups? What is the relation between intelligence and emotion and between intelligence and motivation? And what about consciousness? Will it make a difference to the AI’s action if it feels something, anything, and if it, too, can experience the sights and sounds of the universe?

In a field largely defined by science-fiction novels and movies acting as laboratories for exploring the possible, Bostrom’s Superintelligence is a philosopher’s Cassandra call to action (adorned with more than 40 pages of endnotes). Woe to us if we don’t eventually tackle the questions that the book throws out. Doing so effectively will be possible only once we have a principled, scientific account of the internal constraints and the architecture of biological intelligence. Only then will we be in a better position to put effective control structures in place to maximize the vast benefits that may come about if we develop smart companions to help solve the myriad problems humankind faces.”

 

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https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/0/0d/Superintelligence-Paths_Dangers_Strategies.jpg/220px-Superintelligence-Paths_Dangers_Strategies.jpg 

A philosopher worries about computers’ ever accelerating abilities to outpace human skills

By Christof Koch on September 1, 2015
“We are in the midst of a revolution in machine intelligence, the art and engineering practices that let computers perform tasks that, until recently, could be done only by people…. For the record, most experts believe that strong machine intelligence will arrive before the century is over, assuming current trends continue.

Superintelligence: Paths, Dangers, Strategies deals with the aftermath of that event. The book’s author, Nick Bostrom, a professor of philosophy at the University of Oxford, has a background in theoretical physics and neuroscience. His scholarly work is focused on understanding and mitigating emerging risks that threaten the very survival of the human species: full-blown nuclear warfare, massive climate change, synthetic biology, nanotechnology or runaway machine intelligence.

Superintelligence deals with the last. I warmly recommend the opening and the closing chapters for their enticing arguments, soaring metaphors and insightful fables. You will come away unsettled, if not downright frightened…..

To constrain what could happen and ensure that humanity retains some modicum of control, we need to better understand the only known form of intelligence. That is, we need to develop a science of intelligence by studying people and their brains to try to deduce what might be the ultimate capabilities and goals of a machine intelligence. What makes a person smart, able to deal with a complex world that is in constant flux? How does intelligence develop throughout infancy, childhood and adolescence? How did intelligence evolve?

How much does intelligence depend on being embedded in social groups? What is the relation between intelligence and emotion and between intelligence and motivation? And what about consciousness? Will it make a difference to the AI’s action if it feels something, anything, and if it, too, can experience the sights and sounds of the universe?

In a field largely defined by science-fiction novels and movies acting as laboratories for exploring the possible, Bostrom’s Superintelligence is a philosopher’s Cassandra call to action (adorned with more than 40 pages of endnotes). Woe to us if we don’t eventually tackle the questions that the book throws out. Doing so effectively will be possible only once we have a principled, scientific account of the internal constraints and the architecture of biological intelligence. Only then will we be in a better position to put effective control structures in place to maximize the vast benefits that may come about if we develop smart companions to help solve the myriad problems humankind faces.”

 

Christof Koch is president and chief scientific officer at the Allen Institute for Brain Science in Seattle. He serves on Scientific American Mind’s board of advisers.

https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/will-artificial-intelligence-surpass-our-own/ 

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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Superintelligence:_Paths,_Dangers,_Strategies 

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“… This profoundly ambitious and original book breaks down a vast track of difficult intellectual terrain. After an utterly engrossing journey that takes us to the frontiers of thinking about the human condition and the future of intelligent life, we find in Nick Bostrom’s work nothing less than a reconceptualization of the essential task of our time.”

amazon.com

http://www.kurzweilai.net/superintelligence-paths-dangers-strategies 

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P0Nf3TcMiHo 

 [Nick Bostrom’s TED Talk on “a future full of human enhancement, nanotechnology and cloning long before they became mainstream concerns. Bostrom approaches both the inevitable and the speculative using the tools of philosophy, bioethics and probability.” ]

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fOhb7wkyMVo [107] [Nick Bostrom on Superintelligence]

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How artificial intelligence is changing economic theory

July 17, 2015 by Leah Burrows

http://phys.org/news/2015-07-artificial-intelligence-economic-theory.html 

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The Three Breakthroughs that Have Unleased AI

https://www.wired.com/2014/10/future-of-artificial-intelligence/ 

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“Artificial Intelligence (AI) is a science and a set of computational technologies that are inspired by—but typically operate quite differently from—the ways people use their nervous systems and bodies to sense, learn, reason, and take action. While the rate of progress in AI has been patchy and unpredictable, there have been significant advances since the field’s inception sixty years ago. Once a mostly academic area of study, twenty-first century AI enables a constellation of mainstream technologies that are having a substantial impact on everyday lives…..”

ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE AND LIFE IN 2030

ONE HUNDRED YEAR STUDY ON ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE |

REPORT OF THE 2015 STUDY PANEL | SEPTEMBER 2016

The Stanford 100 Year Study on Artificial Intelligence (AI100)

https://ai100.stanford.edu/2016-report 

https://ai100.stanford.edu/sites/default/files/ai100report10032016fnl_singles.pdf 

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“The human brain has many interesting properties. Raj Reddy speculated that there are about one hundred billion neural cells in the human brain and the brain might be performing 200 trillion operations per second if not faster than that [12]. In problem domains such as vision, speech and motor processes, “it is more powerful than 1,000 supercomputers; however, for simple tasks such as multiplication, it is less powerful than a four bit microprocessor” [12]. These processing events taking place in the brain require little conscious effort and awareness on the part of humans and they are extremely difficult for machines to emulate. Conversely, machines can excel in some processes that are difficult if not impossible to a human being. Reddy went on to argue that silicon-based intelligence, if it’s ever achieved, might just have different attributes after all.”

[12]. Foundations and Grand Challenges of Artificial Intelligence. Reddy, R. Winter, 1988, AI Magazine, p. 9.  

The History of Artificial Intelligence, p. 15

full pdf here:

 http://courses.cs.washington.edu/courses/csep590/06au/projects/history-ai.pdf

 

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Preparing for the Future of Artificial Intelligence

Executive Office of the President

National Science and Technology Council

Committee on Technology

October 2016

58-page pdf: preparing_for_the_future_of_ai 

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A tutorial on AI and video games

http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/research/project/video-games-and-artificial-intelligence/ 

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http://www.mbchapel.org/site/images/video_library.jpg 

President Barack Obama on How Artificial Intelligence Will Affect Jobs | WIRED

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DgL32wtgeXQ

[10 minutes]

See also 

The White House today release a report on the future of artificial intelligence. The document covered a number of concerns. Perhaps the shortest major section was “AI, Automation, and the Economy.”

http://www.forbes.com/forbes/ 

https://www.whitehouse.gov/sites/default/files/whitehouse_files/microsites/ostp/NSTC/preparing_for_the_future_of_ai.pdf 

 

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Other Videos

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9TRv0cXUVQw

An 8-minute video primer on AI

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Artificial Intelligence and the Future

Deep Mind’s Demis Hassabis at the Royal Society of the Arts

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cEL4iR-d4L8

[48 minutes]

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Artificial Intelligence and Robotics

2016

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1wxwSdQpjHk 

[50 minutes]

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Blurring the Lines Between Humans and Machines

Speakers

Pascale Fung, Professor, Department of Electronic and Computer Engineering, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology

Ben Goertzel, Chief Scientist, Hanson Robotics; Chief Scientist, Aidyia Ltd.

Hsiao-Wuen Hon, Corporate Vice President, Microsoft Corp.; Chairman, Asia-Pacific R&D Group, Microsoft

Filmed Sept 2016

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ko5rvfiK5vM

[60 minutes]

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OpenAI – Deep Learning for Computer Vision

Andrej Karpathy

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_njYDK9Frpg 

[85 minutes]

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THE ASSOCIATION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE

http://www.aaai.org/home.html 

A major source for symposia, conferences and a magazine

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Journals and Books

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See the bibliography here

http://www.encyclopedia.com/science-and-technology/computers-and-electrical-engineering/computers-and-computing/artificial 

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Artificial Intelligence, which commenced publication in 1970, is now the generally accepted premier international forum for the publication of results of current research in this field.

http://www.journals.elsevier.com/artificial-intelligence/

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Artificial Intelligence: A Modern Approach

(Third edition) by Stuart Russell and Peter Norvig

The leading textbook in Artificial Intelligence.

Used in over 1300 universities in over 110 countries.

The 22nd most cited computer science publication on Citeseer (and 4th most cited publication of this century).

http://aima.cs.berkeley.edu 

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Ai4u: Mind-1.1 Programmer s Manual (Paperback)

Arthur T Murray

Published by iUniverse, United States (2002)

ISBN 10: 0595259227 ISBN 13: 9780595259229

New Paperback

Item Description: iUniverse, United States, 2002. Paperback. Book Condition: New. 215 x 172 mm. Language: English . Brand New Book ***** Print on Demand *****. AI4U: Mind-1.1 Programer s Manual has the following positive and negative points. + It describes the rapidly evolving AI Minds on the Web. – It quickly becomes obsolete as the AI hyper-evolves. + On-demand publishing (ODP) makes for quick updates. – The Mentifex project is considered oddball on the Net. + You ve got the first book about the first real AI Mind. – There are other, better, more authoritative AI textbooks. + AI4U makes a good supplement for actually coding AI. – Artificial intelligence is too hard to understand. + AI4U describes the AI while it is still easy to learn. – I would rather build robots than study AI programming. + If you want to build a smart robot, then AI4U is for you. – I m only a high school student/teacher; what s the use? + This book will challenge even the most gifted student. – I am not a programmer and so I can t code AI. + AI4U teaches you how to operate an AI, not just code it. – I just want to do Web design, not artificial intelligence. + AI4U provides an AI that you may install on your website. – I am more interested in neuroscience and/or psychology. + AI4U teaches a theory of how the brain works psychologically. Bookseller Inventory # AAV9780595259229

http://www.abebooks.com/book-search/author/arthur-t-murray/ 

See also:

https://bytes.com/topic/c/answers/62154-c-ai-blog 

http://www.nothingisreal.com/mentifex_faq.html 

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https://www.udacity.com/course/intro-to-artificial-intelligence–cs271 

[four-month self-paced nanodegree]

http://si.wsj.net/public/resources/images/BI-AA979_AI_G_20150506144558.jpg 

source of image:

http://blogs.wsj.com/digits/2015/12/03/artificial-intelligence-ethics-a-new-focus-at-cambridge-university/ 

http://grad-schools.usnews.rankingsandreviews.com/best-graduate-schools/top-science-schools/artificial-intelligence-rankings  

MIT’s Computer Science & Artificial Intelligence Laboratory

https://www.csail.mit.edu 

https://ocw.mit.edu/courses/electrical-engineering-and-computer-science/6-034-artificial-intelligence-fall-2010/lecture-videos/ [open courseware at MIT]

https://www.edx.org/course/artificial-intelligence-uc-berkeleyx-cs188-1x [free course at Berkeley]

https://ocw.mit.edu/courses/electrical-engineering-and-computer-science/6-825-techniques-in-artificial-intelligence-sma-5504-fall-2002/lecture-notes/Lecture1Final.pdf 

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click on large image

http://www.legaltechnology.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/Artificial-Intelligence-AI-larger-graphic.png 

Artificial Intelligence in Law – The State of Play in 2015?

Added on the 3rd Nov 2015 at 12:17 pm

by Michael Mills, the co-founder and chief strategy officer of Neota Logic Inc., developers of a no-code software platform with which non-programmers can build expert systems to automate advice, documents, and processes.

http://www.legaltechnology.com/latest-news/artificial-intelligence-in-law-the-state-of-play-in-2015/ 

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On the validity of the Turing Test

http://www.psych.utoronto.ca/users/reingold/courses/ai/turing.html 

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Artificial intelligence, machine learning and advanced algorithms are at the heart of an emerging digital world.

That was one of the chiefs components of Gartner’s Peter Sondergaard, senior vice president and global head of Research opening remarks at today’s Gartner Symposium/ITxpo show in Orlando.

“Machine learning and artificial intelligence move at the speed of data, not at the speed of code releases. Information is the new code base.”

CIOs will participate in the building of a new digital platform with intelligence at the center,” Sondergaard said told a crowd of more than 8,000 CIOs and IT leaders. “The new competitive differentiator is understanding the customer’s intent through advanced algorithms and artificial intelligence. Creating new experiences that solve problems customers didn’t realize they had.”

Gartner says “advanced machine learning algorithms are composed of many technologies (such as deep learning, neural networks and natural-language processing), used in unsupervised and supervised learning, that operate guided by lessons from existing information.”

Advanced machine learning not only enables a smart machine to understand concepts in the environment, but enables it to learn. Through machine learning, a smart machine can change its future behavior. For example, by analyzing vast databases of medical case histories, “learning” machines can reveal previously unknown insights in treatment effectiveness. This area is evolving quickly, and organizations must assess how they can apply these technologies to gain competitive advantage, Gartner said last Fall in presenting trends for 2016.

Gartner says artificial intelligence “is technology that appears to emulate human performance typically by learning, coming to its own conclusions, appearing to understand complex content, engaging in natural dialogs with people, enhancing human cognitive performance (also known as cognitive computing) or replacing people on execution of nonroutine tasks. Applications include autonomous vehicles, automatic speech recognition and generation and detecting novel concepts and abstractions (useful for detecting potential new risks and aiding humans quickly understand very large bodies of ever changing information).”

“We are building machines that learn from experience and produce outcomes their designers did not explicitly envision. Systems that can experience and adapt to the world via the data they collect,” Sondergaard said. “Machine learning and artificial intelligence move at the speed of data, not at the speed of code releases. Information is the new code base.”

http://www.networkworld.com/article/3132006/data-center/gartner-artificial-intelligence-algorithms-and-smart-software-at-the-heart-of-big-network-changes.html 

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How smart is today’s artificial intelligence?

multi-media (video, audio and text) from PBS

http://www.pbs.org/newshour/bb/smart-todays-artificial-intelligence/ 

[with 54 comments]

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“… In response to AIs rapid developments, more than 8,000 leading researchers and scientists — including Elon Musk and Stephen Hawking — have signed an open letter alluding to AI’s potential pitfalls and possible detriment to humanity. Their main concern is that an existential risk faces humanity: an AI in control of autonomous weapons.

The letter goes on to state that autonomous weapons are quickly becoming the third revolution in warfare, after gunpowder and nuclear arms, and that AI researchers must focus their research on what is beneficial for humanity, and not just what is profitable. However, much of what is researched with AI may not be public knowledge, and is likely internal research that’s closely held by just a few very wealthy corporations. How can the public make informed decisions about something that is kept secret?….”

https://techcrunch.com/2016/10/23/advancements-in-artificial-intelligence-should-be-kept-in-the-public-eye/ 

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Artificial intelligence researchers have developed software that is capable of making complex decisions to accurately predict the outcome of human rights trials.

The AI “judge” was developed by computer scientists at University College London (UCL), the University of Sheffield and the University of Pennsylvania using an algorithm that analyzed the text of cases at the European Court of Human Rights.

Judicial decisions from the court were predicted with 79 percent accuracy by the machine learning algorithm.

“Previous studies have predicted outcomes based on the nature of the crime, or the policy position of each judge, so this is the first time judgments have been predicted using analysis of text prepared by the court,” said Vasileios Lampos, co-author of the research.

More: http://www.newsweek.com/ethical-artificial-intelligence-judge-predicts-human-rights-trials-513012 

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Artificial intelligence-powered malware is coming, and it’s going to be terrifying

http://www.businessinsider.com/darktrace-dave-palmer-artificial-intelligence-powered-malware-hacks-interview-2016-10 

The future is on its way, and there’s nothing you can do about it.

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How to Hold Algorithms Accountable

“… algorithms fed by big data can also amplify structural discrimination, produce errors that deny services to individuals, or even seduce an electorate into a false sense of security. Indeed, there is growing awareness that the public should be wary of the societal risks posed by over-reliance on these systems and work to hold themaccountable…..”

Algorithmic systems have a way of making mistakes or leading to undesired consequences. Here are five principles to help technologists deal with that.

November 17, 2016

https://www.technologyreview.com/s/602933/how-to-hold-algorithms-accountable/MIT 

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The Future (Probably) Isn’t as Scary as You Think 

Internet pioneer Kevin Kelly tries to predict the future by identifying what’s truly inevitable. How worried should we be? Yes, robots will probably take your job — but the future will still be pretty great.

 http://freakonomics.com/podcast/future-probably-isnt-scary-think/

wasn’t that special?

Well, wasn’t that special?

I took a week off because suddenly things were afoot.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zi3i-HqDNFI

 

Grexit lurked in the wings, things were being banned (with the help of death threats), and the debate about Jade Helm went silent (getting people to respond to the scenario laid out by the lady in those podcasts was like pulling legs off the multi-legged thing running around in the bottom of the tub… first you have to catch it, and then pin it down), and major off-‘net events loomed large.

[Wouldn’t it be nice if we could ban dual citizenships, major political influence by groups that represent less than 5% of the population, dum-dum bullets, and social engineering?] 

I had to accomplish the medical pivot that had been put in motion. I’d changed PCP’s and medical groups and, having arranged the transfer of medical records, all the first visits with multiple providers (and their required lab tests) were beginning to queue up like morning flights out of Logan.  I have succeeded in getting four done, with nine more in the wings. During one of those visits, I encountered the early July double issue edition of Time in the waiting room. “The answer issue” it was called, and it was a model in crunching data into meaningless mindless info-graphic crap fit for the few moments you can find waiting for your medical provider to call your name.

One of those medical visits was a long-overdue re-evaluation by  a physical therapist. Results are still pending, but the first phase is already underway: more routine walking and light exercise with ankle weights.  Being taught a series of dynamic stretching exercises comes next week. Vitamin D and calcium dosing is underway. Is this PMR or simply de-conditioning post-procedure? The tapering of prednisone continues. Cardiology comes into focus next week as well. One echo has been done and the one with contrast scheduled.

Having beaten the reaper several times at a cost of one million from the insurance company, I am not  going to back-slide and I am squeezing and pushing as hard as I can. I expect also to be able to incorporate formal mindfulness meditation and healing visualization regimens.

The mailman brought the DVD “Kill The Messenger” starring Jeremy Renner; my wife gave me the DVD by Dr. Wayne Dyer “I Can See Clearly Now” which will come into focus shortly, and four books from Barnes & Noble: “Weaponizing Maps”, “A Government of Wolves” and “Battlefield America” by John Whitehead, and Sibel Edmonds’ novel “The Lone Gladio”, which was noted on James Corbett’s NWO reading list ( https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OEwFCd3L6HA ).

Stacked on top of all that was Peter Levenda’s “The Hitler Legacy” which looks incredibly interesting and also incredibly scary. My summer viewing and reading menu is filling in.

The week started off with the question of how the arrival of house guests was going to sync with my seven-year-old grandson’s birthday party but it worked out perfectly; we got to go see him discover the bike we bought him in the garage, as well as the junior custom low-weighted tractor his dad picked up in used but excellent condition in mid-state New York (complete with lawn-mowing and snow-plowing attachments and a dump-trailer his other grand-dad built him to hook on to it).  He backed it out of the garage and piloted it through the gap in the shrubs like a pro; we turned south to meet my sister and her husband arriving from over the mountain.

Three days with them trading tales of our upbringing, our parents, and the locations we were raised in, were spread among three nights out at restaurants. It was an extended OldFarts Tertulliana. The six-year Navy veteran with a top secret radioman’s rating whose term of duty got extended a little longer during the Cuban Missile crisis said we were going to have a civil war within a year. Three major revelations about my father came with those tales, and they were not pretty. They came as no great surprise, but were still startling and disconcerting. The man was more of a monster than I ever thought and the revelations confirmed my suspicions about a range of other topics. Well, wasn’t that special?  My father twice disowned me (to what purpose? separating me from his vast non-existent fortune? putting distance between me and the mis-perceived weighty hauteur of his lineage?).  I’ve just now finally returned the favor.  Now that he has left us— along with our brother— , the compartmentalization within the family has begun to break down and reveal more and more, and the healing continues.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7SvDzaJQXY8

After they left, the grandson and his kid sister came by to stay over for another Kindertotten Tertulliana.  I hooked up my keyboard synthesizer to the GarageBand in my Mac and they tickled the ivories for about 15 minutes, then played for a while, then watched TV and went to bed.

After Cheerios over “Jesse” in the morning, they went back home with their nana so I could finish up days worth of de-discombobulating maintenance.

But the keyboard remains plugged in.