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pressing matters

pressing matters

Hannah Arendt (October 14, 1906–December 4, 1975) examined those peculiar parallel dimensions of loneliness as a profoundly personal anguish and an indispensable currency of our political life in her intellectual debut, the incisive and astonishingly timely 1951 classic The Origins of Totalitarianism (public library).

Arendt paints loneliness as “the common ground for terror” and explores its function as both the chief weapon and the chief damage of oppressive political regimes. Exactly twenty years before her piercing treatise on lying in politics, she writes:

Just as terror, even in its pre-total, merely tyrannical form ruins all relationships between men, so the self-compulsion of ideological thinking ruins all relationships with reality. The preparation has succeeded when people have lost contact with their fellow men* as well as the reality around them; for together with these contacts, [they] lose the capacity of both experience and thought. The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the convinced Communist, but people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction (i.e., the reality of experience) and the distinction between true and false (i.e., the standards of thought) no longer exist.

What perpetuates such tyrannical regimes, Arendt argues, is manipulation by isolation — something most effectively accomplished by the divisiveness of “us vs. them” narratives. She writes:

Terror can rule absolutely only over men who are isolated against each other… Therefore, one of the primary concerns of all tyrannical government is to bring this isolation about. Isolation may be the beginning of terror; it certainly is its most fertile ground; it always is its result. This isolation is, as it were, pretotalitarian; its hallmark is impotence insofar as power always comes from men acting together…; isolated men are powerless by definition.

Although isolation is not necessarily the same as loneliness, Arendt notes that loneliness can become both the seedbed and the perilous consequence of the isolation effected by tyrannical regimes:

In isolation, man remains in contact with the world as the human artifice; only when the most elementary form of human creativity, which is the capacity to add something of one’s own to the common world, is destroyed, isolation becomes altogether unbearable… Isolation then becomes loneliness.

[…]

While isolation concerns only the political realm of life, loneliness concerns human life as a whole. Totalitarian government, like all tyrannies, certainly could not exist without destroying the public realm of life, that is, without destroying, by isolating men, their political capacities. But totalitarian domination as a form of government is new in that it is not content with this isolation and destroys private life as well. It bases itself on loneliness, on the experience of not belonging to the world at all, which is among the most radical and desperate experiences of man.

This is why our insistence on belonging, community, and human connection is one of the greatest acts of courage and resistance in the face of oppression….”

https://www.brainpickings.org/2016/12/20/hannah-arendt-origins-of-totalitarianism-loneliness-isolation-oppression 

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Vice Joins Trend Of Killing News Comments Because Giving A Damn About Your Site’s Community Is Just Too Hard

from the i-love-you.-here’s-your-new-muzzle. dept

We’ve talked a lot about how the trend du jour in online media is to ditch the news comment section, then condescendingly pretend this is because the website just really values user relationships…. napalming your on-site community because you’re too lazy to weed the garden certainly is a slight against those users. And as we saw with NPR, these users are well aware of this fact, and are more than happy to spend their time on websites that actually value conversation and user interaction, instead of just paying empty lip service to the concept.

https://www.techdirt.com/articles/20161227/09365436348/vice-joins-trend-killing-news-comments-because-giving-damn-about-your-sites-community-is-just-too-hard.shtml 

via

http://www.blacklistednews.com/

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music:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ui-cL6YOKHI

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Maternal genealogy is unknown beyond my mother except for the presence of a Scots-Irish (Presbyterian) family in Western Pennsylvania. The paternal genealogy includes DNA that is apparently (but confusedly) of Normal or Saxon origin which moved from the Iberian peninsula after the last Ice Age up into Norman or perhaps Breton turf until, apparently as mercenaries or in followership, the Norman conquest of England. My father’s mother was of Prussian heritage. Ancestral history in my family from before the crossing of the English Channel is very clouded.   

More precise records extend from the summer of 1638 when two brothers caught a ride aboard a ship out of Hull, England to cross the Atlantic to come to England in search of religious freedom. “They were men of respectability, ‘of good estate,’ and could probably have no hopes of improving their worldly condition by emigration. They were lovers of liberty, and men of distinct and well-marked religious views. They were non-conformists. They had too sturdy an independence, as well as too strong a sense of duty, to abandon what they held as truth even in the midst of the bitterest persecution. For this reason they left their homes and sought in the wilds of America a resting place from oppression, a spot where they and their children might enjoy freedom to worship God. They were men of thought and character….”  In 1639, they settled on land north of Ipswich with which to raise and breed sheep and establish the first wool clothier’s trade. The ship’s cargo included “the first printing press, later to be set up in Cambridge, the only printing press in the country until 1685”.

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-m9PKdUHpb1o/U5YmEJw1FdI/AAAAAAAAuiM/hFDNCeJD2Yo/s1600/Town+seal+Rowley.gif

That familial reference to the first printing press in colonial New England seems uncertain but is confirmed by other references and sources. 

“… The first printing press came to British North America two years after the founding of Harvard College. The press was brought by Reverend Joseph Glover, who, when deprived of his position in the Church of England, shipped his family, his possessions, and his printing press to the colonies. Glover also paid for the passage of the man in charge of running his press, Stephen Daye, a locksmith by profession. Daye was under financial contract to work in Glover’s home in Cambridge in order to repay the cost of passage for himself, his wife, and his household—a total of around £51. Rev. Glover, however, did not survive the passage to the New World. When Daye and the press arrived, his debt was transferred to Glover’s widow, Elizabeth, now owner of the printing press.

Daye set to work almost immediately along with his son Matthew, an apprentice printer, and perhaps more skilled than his father. Within the first year in the Massachusetts Bay Colony, they printed The Freeman’s Oath, a broadside, which is generally believed to be the first tract printed in British North America. This was completed around the same time as “an almanac made for New England by Mr. William Pierce.” 1 By virtue of exploiting a loophole in colonial legislation, Daye printed the first book in the New World, The Bay Psalm Book, in 1640. This book became extremely popular and influential throughout the colony for the remainder of the 17th century.  It was only three years later that the first Bible published in the New World was also published in Cambridge.

Elizabeth Glover (born Harris), as an unmarried woman, was a rarity in colonial New England. Especially unique was that she was not only an eligible woman of property but also the owner of the only printing press in the British colonies. Her attractiveness as a mate was clear to the President of Harvard, Henry Dunster. On June 21, 1641 they were married, transferring all of her property to his home on the now-named Dunster Street. Elizabeth died in 1643, and her land and property, including the printing press, was passed on to Dunster and subsequently to Harvard College. During the same year Matthew Daye replaced his father as official operator of the press after the elder Daye was briefly jailed for fraud.

As Harvard grew in size and reputation, it became a logical center of printing in the American colonies. Cambridge was the location of not just the first printing press, but also the second when in 1659 a press was sent to the colonies from the British firm “The Company for the Propagation of the Gospel Amongst the Heathen Natives of New England and parts Adjacent in America.” Matthew Daye’s successor Samuel Green was in charge of printing at this point, but the British firm also sent over the America’s first professional printer, Marmaduke Johnson, to assist Green. The new press was set up in Harvard Yard, in a building called the Indian College, to print Reverend John Eliot’s “Indian Bible.”

Marmaduke Johnson acquired his own press in England in 1665, and planned to bring it to Boston in order to establish his own business. However, Harvard wanted a replacement for Glover’s original press, having become fragile over the years, and the Harvard leadership successfully lobbied for a state law stating that no printing could be done outside of Cambridge. Forced into staying in Cambridge, Johnson instead, without any affiliation to Harvard, opened the first independent printing press in the colonies and went on to publish 20 books between 1665 and 1674…..”

http://www.cambridgehistory.org/discover/innovation/American%20Printing.html 

http://www.history.org/Foundation/journal/Spring03/images/occurrencessm.jpg

Facsimile of the first and only issue of the English-American colonies’ first newspaper, published in Boston 1690.

Early American Newspapering

by James Breig

We are here at the end of the World, and Europe may

bee turned topsy turvy ere wee can hear a word of it.

-Virginia planter William Byrd, 1690

In seventeenth-century America, colonial governments had rather do without newspapers than brook their annoyance. In 1671, Governor William Berkeley of Virginia wrote: “I thank God, there are no free schools nor printing and I hope we shall not have, these hundred years, for learning has brought disobedience, and heresy, and sects into the world, and printing has divulged them, and libels against the best government. God keep us from both.” As the British government once told the governors of Massachusetts, “Great inconvenience may arise by the liberty of printing.”

Not until 1690 did the first English-American news sheet debut—Boston’s Publick Occurrences Both Forreign and Domestick, published by Benjamin Harris. The authorities, in “high Resentment” that Harris dared to report that English military forces had allied themselves with “miserable” savages, put him out of business four days later.

By the end of the eighteenth century, however, scores of homegrown broadsheets and tabloids satisfied the information appetites of Americans hungry for intelligence of the Old World, for news about the Revolution, and for the political polemics of the infant United States. The history of newspapering in that century digests the beginnings of much of what is served on newsstands in this one.

As the century began, the fledgling colonial press tested its wings. A bolder journalism opened on the eve of the Revolution. And, as the century closed with the birth of the United States, a rancorously partisan and rambunctious press emerged.

The eras can be traced in the history of the family of Benjamin Franklin—the preeminent journalist of his time. But it best begins with another Boston newspaperman, postmaster John Campbell. In 1704, Campbell served up The Boston News-Letter, the nation’s second paper. It was a publication the powers-that-be could stomach. The News-Letter lasted seventy-two years, succeeding in an increasingly competitive industry, supported by the growth of communication and of commerce.

Campbell’s fellow postmasters often became newspaper publishers, too; they had ready access to information to put on their pages. Through their offices came letters, government documents, and newspapers from Europe. Gazettes were also started by printers, who had paper, ink, and presses at hand. Franklin was a postmaster and a printer.

http://www.history.org/Foundation/journal/Spring03/images/News-Letter_detail.jpg

Eighteenth-century editors filled their columns with items lifted from other newspapers—”the exchanges,” as they are called still—and from letters, said Mitchell Stephens, a New York University journalism professor and the author of A History of News. European news, taken from newspapers that arrived in ports like New York, Philadelphia, and Charleston, got good play. The November 8, 1797, issue of the Pennsylvania Gazette, for example, carried this item from New York: “Yesterday arrived here the ship Mary. . . . By this arrival we are furnished with London Papers . . . from which the most important intelligence is extracted.” David Sloan, a University of Alabama journalism professor, lists the sources of stories as “European newspapers, primarily English ones; correspondence sent in by readers; other newspapers in the colonies; and individuals who would drop by the print shop and talk.”

Julie K. Williams, a history instructor at Alabama’s Samford University, said publishers had such altruistic motives as improving communication and educating the public, but profit was their primary purpose. Maurine Beasley, a University of Maryland journalism professor, puts it plainly. The purpose of newspapers was “to make money.”

Williams said, “Newspapers brought in ad revenue and circulation revenue.” That income supplemented receipts from books, government printing jobs, merchant invoices, forms, and other ephemera.

Making money is still what keeps newspapers in business, and that is but one similarity between eighteenth-century papers and the twenty-first’s. As Sloan said, “Newspapers are still printed with ink on paper.” But more than that, newspapers then and now “still have opinions and letters. There was a sense then that newspapers should publish both sides of an issue, even during the Revolution and factional periods.”

Williams ticks off the surface differences in the newspapers of the two centuries—there were no headlines and few illustrations then, for example—as well as cosmetic similarities. “You can look at an eighteenth-century newspaper and recognize the column layout and the general news-ads look of a paper today,” she said. “It is interesting that the ‘look’ is still basically there.

“But the biggest similarity is what news is. We decided in the eighteenth century that newspapers were about ‘occurrences,’ and basically we have stuck to that. I think ‘departments’ are clearly an idea in the eighteenth century. The colonial printer had a standing format that he followed religiously that involved dividing the news by type. These sections were often labeled ‘foreign reports’ and so on.”

To Carol Humphrey, an Oklahoma Baptist University journalism professor and secretary of the American Journalism Historians Association, “The primary legacy of the eighteenth century for modern journalism is the right to comment on political events. The modern-day editorial has its beginnings in that era.”

The DNA of modern newspapers is found in the eighteenth century, Stephens said. “The look is the same,” and “the sense of what news is, is basic to human beings.”

Most colonial newspapers were weeklies, had four pages, and printed most of their advertisements in back. With little space, printers kept many stories brief, encapsulating even significant information into “one short paragraph, even a sentence,” Sloan said.

Newspapers also contained “essays, poems and humorous material, some of which they wrote themselves, like Ben Franklin,” Beasley said. “Sometimes, items that had a sensational or religious aspect appeared, such as a report of a strange creature being sighted or some unusual event occurring attributed to ‘divine providence.’”

Readers wondered about the course of wars in Europe and were curious about happenings in other towns and colonies—especially events that could affect their lives. But they were as interested as readers of today in the ordinary events of the life of their times. When they got their newspaper, subscribers perused such advertisements and news as:

Run away . . . a small yellow Negro wench named Hannah, about 35 years of age, had on when she went away a green plain petticoat and sundry other clothes, but what sort I do not know.—from a 1767 issue of Williamsburg’s Virginia Gazette

For Sale—The spars, anchors, rigging, and hull, of a brig, sixty four feet keel, twenty four and a half feet beam, and ten feet hold.—from a 1782 issue of the Virginia Gazette and Weekly Advertiser

The noted High Bred Horse Old Mark Anthony, now in high perfection, and as vigorous as ever, stands at my stable this season in order to cover mares, at £3. the leap.—also from a 1782 issue of the Virginia Gazette and Weekly Advertiser

Last Friday, the fatal and ever memorable Day of the Martyrdom of King Charles the First, a most extraordinary Misfortune befell this Place, by the Destruction of our fine Capitol. . . . The Cupola was soon burnt, the two Bells that were in it were melted, and, together with the Clock, fell down, and were destroyed.—from a 1747 issue of the Pennsylvania Gazette, but datelined Williamsburg, Feb. 5.

http://www.history.org/Foundation/journal/Spring03/images/first-gazette_detail.jpg 

When, as the century began, Campbell and his colleagues set up their forms, they entered a risky business. Printers were licensed by the government, and they could be unlicensed swiftly, and imprisoned. That happened to Benjamin Franklin’s older brother James, publisher of the New-England Courant.

James Franklin inspired his sibling’s interest in printing. “In 1717,” the younger Franklin wrote, “James returned from England with a press and letters to set up his business in Boston. . . . My father was impatient to have me bound to my brother.” The boy was at length “persuaded, and signed the indentures when I was yet but twelve years old.” But like the publisher of Publick Occurrences, James Franklin ran afoul of the authorities. “One of the pieces in our newspaper gave offense to the Assembly,” Benjamin Franklin said. His brother “was taken up, censur’d, and imprison’d for a month. . . . During my brother’s confinement . . . I had the management of the paper.”

When the government freed the older Franklin, it forbade him to print the Courant any longer. The brothers circumvented the order by putting Benjamin Franklin’s name on it.

John Peter Zenger, editor of the New-York Weekly Journal, was arrested in 1734 and charged with seditious libel for criticisms of Governor William Cosby. The facts were against Zenger, but a jury more sympathetic to free speech than to authority acquitted him. Franklin, who had moved to Philadelphia, where he founded Poor Richard’s Almanac and the Pennsylvania Gazette, endorsed the verdict in a couplet:

While free from Force the Press remains,

Virtue and Freedom cheer our Plains.

Typical for Franklin and his colleagues, the lines are lifted from a poem by Mathew Green, “The Spleen,” published in 1737.

As happy as editors were to see Zenger vindicated, they noticed that he had spent ten months in jail awaiting trial. His wife had carried on the Journal, but clearly a newspaperman’s livelihood and liberty depended on the forbearance of the government.

At mid-century, the press began to alter its stance and became more outspoken. In 1754, during the French and Indian War, Franklin published America’s first newspaper cartoon, a picture showing a snake cut into sections, each part representing a colony, with the caption: “Join or Die.”

Franklin became a wealthy publisher and editor. He linked print shops and post offices in a coastal chain, and spread newspapering up and down the seaboard. Newspapers founded under his aegis prospered and, as troubles with Great Britain mounted, became precisely the “great inconvenience” England feared.

Stephens said the purpose of newspapers “changed to the political and polemical after 1765—around the time of the Stamp Act-as tensions snowballed.” Sloan said, “During the Revolution, the main goal was to support the American cause.”

http://www.history.org/Foundation/journal/Spring03/images/coffin_detail.gif

“Prior to the Revolution, newspapers existed primarily to inform people of what was going on in the rest of the world,” Humphrey said. “The Revolution changed the focus to events in the other colonies.”

Daily publication began in the 1780s, just as the new American republic emerged. There were about 100 newspapers by 1790, many of them were spirited, and some were great annoyances to men in high positions. It was a time of enormous press freedom, a freedom exercised frequently in behalf of the Federalist or Republican parties, which subsidized their own publications. Humphrey said, “Many newspapers in the 1790s were intended to accept a particular political party.” Two examples are the Gazette of the United States for the Hamiltonian Federalists; the National Gazette for the Jeffersonian Republicans. “Their editors believed that they should support their particular party in all that they did,” she noted, “so they wrote essays in support of their party and included editorial comments in the news pieces that either supported their party or attacked the opposition.”

This was the era of Philip Freneau, John Fenno, and James Callendar, sharp-penned scribes who used their journalistic skills to laud their friends and denigrate their enemies. This was the era when government officials and political figures—Alexander Hamilton and James Madison among them—adopted pseudonyms to promote their politics in the public prints anonymously.

Many of the founding fathers were enthusiastic about a free press. Thomas Jefferson wrote in 1787 that “were it left to me to decide whether we should have a government without newspapers or newspapers without a government, I should not hesitate a moment to prefer the latter.” Samuel Adams said in 1768 that “there is nothing so fretting and vexatious, nothing so justly terrible to tyrants . . . as a free press.”

But newspaper partisanship had evolved from the Revolution. “Newspapers that were used to denouncing Tories and the King,” Stephens said, “slid easily into denouncing opposition parties, even the President of the United States.”

George Washington declared a lack of interest in newspapers before he was president, writing in 1786 that “my avocations are so numerous that I very rarely find time to look into Gazettes after they come to me.” But while in office, he sometimes was incensed at what he saw in print. In notes about a 1793 cabinet meeting, Secretary of State Jefferson recorded how the president went on in such “a high tone” about the paper of “that rascal” Freneau that the cabinet officers were momentarily stunned into silence.

Benjamin Franklin’s grandson and namesake, Benjamin Franklin Bache—also known as “Lightning Rod Junior”—edited the Aurora. Bache delighted in harassing President Washington, once labeling him “the source of all the misfortunes of our country” and declaring him “utterly incapable.”

When John Adams wrote “A Constitution or Form of Government for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts” in 1779, he included a guarantee of liberty of the press. But as president, Adams endorsed the Alien and Sedition Acts, aimed at muzzling the opposition by jailing editors who dared criticize the chief executive.

Sloan said Bache was “a really ardent, zealous partisan. He epitomizes the intensely partisan editor.” Bache was indicted under the Alien and Sedition Acts but died before his case came to trial. Adams’s successor, Jefferson, released imprisoned journalists and allowed the law to lapse.

Stephens said that the free—and free-wheeling—press of the federal period helped to create the United States: “It is hard to imagine the United States arriving when it did without a free press. It was a wild, unruly press, but democracy was a great experiment and an aggressive press was part of it.”

Much has changed in the centuries since Benjamin Harris set up his type. Among other things, the web press, the linotype, and, eventually, offset printing came to the business. The telegraph and news services supplanted the exchanges. The First Amendment, written originally to protect the press only from the federal Congress, was interpreted to apply to the governments of the states. Illustrations and photographs became as important as words. Journalism emerged as a diplomaed, white-collar profession. And the role of the press as a “great inconvenience” to government is a hallmark of democratic government.

“How,” asks Stephens, “can you run a country without a free press?”

Jim Breig, an Albany, New York, writer and weekly newspaper editor, contributed “Out, Damn’d Proverbs: Eighteenth-Century Axioms, Maxims, and Bywords” to the winter 2002-2003 journal.

http://www.history.org/Foundation/journal/spring03/journalism.cfm 

 

In 1638, the first printing press arrived in Boston.

By 1700, Boston became the second largest publishing center of the English Empire. The Puritans were the first to write books for children, and to discuss the difficulties in communicating with them. At a time when other Americans were physically blazing trails through the forests, the Puritans efforts in areas of study were advancing the country intellectually.

The Bible stimulated their intellect by promoting discussions of literature. Greek classics, Cicero, Virgil, Terence and Ovid were taught, as well as some poetry and Latin verse. The Puritans also encouraged themselves to create their own poetry, always religious in content.

Anyway, three English diversions were banned in the Puritans’ New England colonies: drama, religious music and erotic poetry. The first and last of these because they led to immorality. Music in worship, instead, created a “dreamy” state which was not conducive in listening to God.

The first newspaper was issued in Boston in 1704.

http://www.timerime.com/es/evento/986843/First+printing+press+in+Boston/ 

[Ed.: Today, of course, there is a growth industry involving audio forms of meditation, the neuro-cognitive research done to examine the concept of spiritual perception, in essence a merger between neuroscience and New Age approaches.]

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In 1754, four newspapers only were printed in New England, these were all published in Boston, and, usually, on a small sheet.; They were published weekly, and the average number of copies did not exceed six hundred from each press. No paper had then been issued in Connecticut, or New Hampshire. Some years before, one was printed for a short time in Rhode Island, but had been discontinued for want of encouragement. Vermont as a state did not exist, and the country which now composes it was then a wilderness. In 1775, a period of only twenty-one years, more copies of a newspaper were issued weekly from the village press at Worcester, Massachusetts, than were printed in all New England, in 1755; and one paper now published contains as much matter as did all the four published in Boston, in the last year mentioned.

At the beginning of 1775, there were five newspapers published in Boston, one at Salem, and one at Newburyport, making seven in Massachusetts. There was, at that time, one published at Portsmouth; and no other in New Hampshire. One was printed at Newport, and one at Providence, making two in Rhode Island. At New London there was one, at New Haven one, one at Hartford and one in Norwich; in all four I Connecticut;and fourteen in New England. In the province of New York, four papers were then published; three in the city and one in Albany. In Pennsylvania there were, on the first of January, 1775, six; three in English and one in German, in Philadelphia, one in German, at Germantown; and one in English and German, at Lancaster. Before the end of January, 1775, three newspapers, in English, were added to the number from the presses I Philadelphia, making nine in Pennsylvania. In Maryland, two; one at Annapolis, and one at Baltimore. In Virginia, there were but two, and both of these at Williamsburg. One was printed at Wilmington, and one in Newbern, in North Carolina; three at Charleston, South Carolina; and one at Savannah, in Georgia. Making thirty-seen newspapers in all the British colonies, which are now comprised in the United States. To these may be added one at Halifax, in Nova Scotia; and one in Canada, at Quebec.

In 1800, there were at least one hundred and fifty publications of this kind printed in the United States of America, and since that time, the number has increased to three hundred and sixty. Those published before 1775 were weekly papers. Soon after the close of the Revolutionary war, daily papers were printed at Philadelphia, New York, &c., and there are now, 1810, more than twenty published, daily, in the United States.

It was common for printers of newspapers to subjoin to their titles ‘Containing the freshest Advices both Foreign and Domestick;’ but gazettes and journals are now chiefly filled with political essays. News do not appear to be always the first object of editors, and, of course, ‘containing the freshest advices,’ &c., is too often out of the question.

For many years after the establishment of newspapers on this continent, very few advertisements appeared in them. This was the case with those that were early printed in Europe. In the first newspapers, advertisements were not separated by lines from the news, &c., and were not even begun with a two line letter; when two line letters were introduced, it was some time before one advertisement was separated from another by a line, or rule as it is termed by printers. After it became usual to separate advertisements, some printers used lines of metal rules; others lines of flowers irregularly placed. I have seen in some New York papers, great primer flowers between advertisements. At length, it became customary to ‘set off advertisements,’ and from using types not larger than those with which the news were printed, types of the size of French canon have often been used for names, especially of those who advertised English goods.

In the troublesome times, occasioned by the stamp act in 1765, some of the more opulent and cautious printers, when the act was to take place, put their papers in mourning, and, for a few weeks, omitted to publish them; others not so timid, but doubtful of the consequence of publishing newspapers without stamps, omitted the titles, or altered them, as an evasion; for instance the Pennsylvania Gazette, and some other papers, were headed ‘Remarkable Occurrences, &c.’ -other printers, particularly those in Boston, continued their papers without any alteration in title or imprint.

From the foregoing it appears that, from the time when the first public journal was published in the country, viz. in April, 1704, to April 1775, comprising a period of seventy-one years, seventy-eight different newspapers were printed in the British American continental colonies; that during this period, thirty-nine, exactly one-half of that number, had been, occasionally, discontinued; and that thirty-nine continued to be issued by the several establishments at the commencement of the revolution. The papers published in the West Indies are not included in this computation.

In the course of thirty-five years, newspaper establishments were, as previously remarked, multiplied in a surprising degree; insomuch, that the number of those printed in the United States in June, 1810, amounted to upwards of three hundred and sixty.

A large proportion of the public papers at that date were established, and supported, by the two great contending political parties, into which the people of these states are usually divided; and whose numbers produce an equipollence; consequently, a great augmentation of vehicles for carrying on the political warfare have been found necessary.

I cannot conclude what I have written on the subject of publike journals, better than by extracting the following pertinent observations on newspapers, from the Rev. Dr. Miller’s Retrospect of the Eighteenth Century.

‘It is worthy of remark that newspapers have almost entirely changed their form and character within the period under review* (*the eighteenth century) For a long time after they were first adopted as a medium of communication to the public, they were confined, in general, to the mere statement of facts. But they have gradually assumed an office more extensive, and risen to a more important station in society. They have become vehicles of discussion, in which the principles of government, the interests of nations, the spirit and tendency of public measures, and the public and private characters of individuals, are all arraigned, tried, and decided. Instead, therefore, of being considered now, as they once were, of small moment in society, they have become immense oral and political engines, closely connected with the welfare of the state, and deeply involving both its peace and prosperity.

‘Newspapers have also become important in a literary view. There are few of them, within the last twenty years, which have not added to their political details some curious and useful information, on the various subjects of literature, science, and art. They have thus become the means of conveying, to every class in society, innumerable scraps of knowledge, which have at once increased the public intelligence, and extended the taste for perusing periodical publications. The advertisements, moreover, which they daily contain, respecting new books, projects, inventions, discoveries and improvements, are well calculated to enlarge and enlighten the public mind, and are worth of being enumerated among the many methods of awakening and maintaining the popular attention, with which more modern times, beyond all preceeding example, abound. . . . “

Index to This Section:

Would there have been an American Revolution Without Newspapers and Mail? The Role of Communications in the American Revolution 

Getting the Word Out: Franklin’s Communications Revolutions

The Dangerous Lives of Printers:

The Evolution of Freedom of the Press

Newspapers in America Before the Era of the Revolution

Newspapers in Revolutionary-Era America and the Problems of Patriot and Loyalist Printers

A Patriot Printer and His “Forge of Sedition”: 

The Story of Isaiah Thomas

The Role of Newspapers in the Revolution:

Isaiah Thomas’s The History of Printing in America

Not Just the News: 

A War of Letters, Pamphlets, Broadsides, and Sermons

http://www1.assumption.edu/ahc/1770s/pprinthisthomas.html 

 

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“But I thank God, there are no free schools nor printing, and I hope we shall not have these hundred years, for learning has brought disobedience, and heresy, and sects into the world, and printing has divulged them, and libels against the best government. God keep us from both!” 

Governor Sir William Berkeley, 1671

 

The Germination of a Free Press: A Dissident Print Culture and the Stamp Act in Colonial Virginia

by

Roger P. Mellen

2006

42 pp.

http://web.nmsu.edu/~rpmellen/freepress.pdf

 

 

 

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“The editor objected to the use of Native auxiliaries in the invation of Canada during King William’s War after he heard reports of them torturing and killing captured French troops.”

“… The first newspaper ever printed in this country met the same fate dealt the first gesture towards press censorship and the first attempt to set up a commercial printing shop: “Publick Occurrances both Foreign and Domestick,” appeared on September 26, 1690, and was immediately forbidden from the Colonies. The Governor and council gave expression to “high resentment and disallowance” to this paper printed by Richard Pierce for Benjamin Harris of Boston, and forbade anyone “for the future to set forth anything in print without license first obtained.”

http://www.thecrimson.com/article/1928/11/30/harvard-college-sponsored-first-printing-press/ 

 

http://wordwenches.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8341c84c753ef0133f4e8ff6a970b-150wi

“… The most intriguing objects found in the Harvard Yard excavations were pieces of lead printing type dating back to the 17th century. At first glance, these lead alloy bars may not impress, but they are small pieces of an important story. Each bears the mold of a single letter. When arranged in rows, coated with thick ink, and pressed onto paper, they created the first books printed in North America. The fonts, or particular shapes, of some of these letters have been matched to surviving 17th-century products of Harvard’s early press…..”

https://www.peabody.harvard.edu/node/2014 

 

https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/236x/bf/e0/bb/bfe0bbef4ee437f2e0c0c7f7350459ad.jpg

“… Ezekiel and his followers pooled their money to organise their New England passage. They left Rowley in the summer of 1638 and travelled down into Hull where they joined the ship John of London, lying in the Old Harbour on the River Hull. After sailing out of the Humber, their ship called into London en route and there picked up the Reverend Joseph Glover, a wealthy nonconformist minister, who brought with him Stephen Daye, a printer, and also what is believed to be North America’s first printing press. Glover is thought to have first visited New England earlier in the 1630s and supported the foundation of Harvard College – which eventually became Harvard University, the oldest institute of higher education in the United States.

Unfortunately, on the long and tortuous journey across the Atlantic, the Reverend Glover died before the vessel reached Salem Bay, Massachusetts in the December of 1638. The migrants probably spent a long first winter in Salem but in spring 1639 Ezekiel Rogers and his followers moved on to land some six miles outside of Ipswich, Massachusetts. House lots and properties were laid out along the township’s brook, allowing each family access to fresh water. Here the new arrivals built many houses and, bringing spinning and weaving skills with them from the East Riding of Yorkshire, they were amongst the first to establish a clothing industry in New England. They called their little township, Rowley after their East Riding village….

Elizabeth Glover, continued with her late husband’s mission and supervised Daye in the setting up of the Press in Cambridge, Massachusetts. In January 1639, the Freeman’s Oath was the first piece printed. The following year, 1640, the press produced The Bay Psalm Book, the first book printed in the English colonies. This may also have been the first book to have been written in North America and is an important part of the history of print; it seems that only five original copies still exist.

The small town of Rowley prospered and Ezekiel Rogers bequeathed his library to Harvard when he died in 1660 and other benefactions from him also eventually went to this learned institution. Early settlers in Rowley played an important part in the establishment of this new country. Elizabeth Glover married Henry Dunster, Harvard’s First President, who had taken interest in the Press. Stephen Daye died in 1668. His son Matthew became an accomplished printer and indeed may have actually done much of the printing with that first press. Printing and publishing in the United States has certainly come a long way since Stephen Daye first sailed with the Rowley settlers back in the summer of 1638.”

Robb Robinson, December 2008

http://www.hull.ac.uk/mhsc/FarHorizons/Documents/EzekielRogers.pdf 

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This past Christmas weekend has been an opportunity for long-range thinking, planning, learning, observing and more planning. Numerous things have been poking me in my ribs, tapping me on my collar-bone, and crackling synaptically inside my skull.                               

We are advised that rumination is unhealthy and should be stopped. 

We are told to return to the source of our creative fire. 

First among the various stimuli is a slowly-emerging intent to focus on writing. Winter has driven me indoors into a little gem of a house with my office, bookcases, coffee pot, pellet stove and functional iMac; in the summertime, I can sit on the deck overlooking the man-made pond and waterfall and the women-tended garden working on a MacAir.

A small bookcase filled with little gems about the art and practice of writing awaits my more complete attention. 

A desktop folder filled with writing ideas and my own stash of “prompts” is now popping fresh new green sprigs. 

Awaiting my investment of time is the half-finished two-hour lecture course on DVD on the craft of writing world-class prose by a distinguished scholar of contemporary literature; there is a similar but not yet started six-hour course in creative non-fiction

I bought myself a copy of The Trickster’s Hat. It’s a “mischievous apprenticeship in creativity”.

I just discovered a new resource when I went looking for background on the popular writer Michael Crichton whose book “Timeline” generated some thoughts; his simple method uses 3×5 cards to plot out storyline

(Note that that web site has a number of great resources for writers. See this year-ending compendium of the top posts from the past year at Writers Helping Writers.

My wife bought me a book of prompts for uncovering the gems in my life’s stories, as well as the fourth edition of “The Craft of Research”. It is “a fundamental and accessible text that explains how to build an argument that engages and persuades readers, how to effectively anticipate and respond to the reservations of readers, and how to find and evaluate sources and integrate them into an argument.” It ends with a 30-page appendix crammed with bibliographic resources in 26 topical categories, starting with a significant two-page compendium of online databases. At $15, it’s the gift of the decade. It may take me ten years to harvest it. 

Meanwhile:

Obama has signed legislation enabling criminal charges for exercising freedom of speech. 

And Social Security has been weaponized by the State as a means of punishment and intimidation for those arrested arrested while exercising their right to assemble in protest. 

Recently the Internet has become a war zone and people have begun to discuss and debate, from both technological and other perspectives, how they will maintain and exercise the right to create, express and thrive independent of political control. 

I’m re-reading a book about “timing, tactics and strategy in narrative-driven decision-making” called Tempo which surely has some value in deciding what direction I am going to take in the future. 

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Four from http://www.strike-the-root.com: 

 

http://www.shtfplan.com/headline-news/propaganda-war-exposed-in-aleppo-about-to-die-saying-goodbye-but-available-for-interview_12232016# 

http://www.activistpost.com/2016/12/more-fake-news-photos-from-aleppo-proven-false-poorly-executed-propaganda.html 

http://www.activistpost.com/2016/12/heres-how-the-government-is-working-to-erode-constitutional-privacy-protections.html 

https://libertyblitzkrieg.com/2016/12/23/this-is-how-the-u-s-government-destroys-the-lives-of-patriotic-whistleblowers/ 

 

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Alexa: Who dunnit?

SAN FRANCISCO – In what may be a first, police in Arkansas asked Amazon for recordings potentially made by an Echo device in connection with a murder investigation.

http://www.usatoday.com/story/tech/news/2016/12/27/amazon-alexa-echo-murder-case-bentonville-hot-tub-james-andrew-bates/95879532/ 

 

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https://www.hrw.org/sites/default/files/styles/node_embed/public/media/images/photographs/2014_Burma_Harn_Lay.jpg?itok=IpRkWIFz

Obama Quietly Signs The “Countering Disinformation And Propaganda Act” Into Law

December 27th, 2016 by Kevin

Via: ZeroHedge:

Long before the “fake news” meme became a daily topic of extensive conversation on such discredited mainstream portals as CNN and WaPo, H.R. 5181 would task the Secretary of State with coordinating the Secretary of Defense, the Director of National Intelligence, and the Broadcasting Board of Governors to “establish a Center for Information Analysis and Response,” which will pinpoint sources of disinformation, analyze data, and — in true dystopic manner — ‘develop and disseminate’ “fact-based narratives” to counter effrontery propaganda.

In short, long before “fake news” became a major media topic, the US government was already planning its legally-backed crackdown on anything it would eventually label “fake news.”

Posted in Dictatorship, Perception Management |

reconciliation

reconciliation

At long last, an actual discussion among bloggers and other interested folk:

http://greencrowasthecrowflies.blogspot.com/2016/09/with-trump-landslide-possibilitytruth.html 

I dumped the guts of the previous As The Crow Flies  blog entry [ see http://greencrowasthecrowflies.blogspot.com/2016/09/truth-and-reconciliation.html ] (with links out to it and Carl Herman here at Washington’s Blog) over at the list-serv on Yahoo (long after the “breach”) for members of the 9/11 and State Crimes tele-conference group.

I have for years been an invited member of the monthly conference call meeting and was recently invited to join the list-serv. Both are somewhat closed groups, though the minutes and audio of the meetings are made public and are sometimes posted. The list of participants is a who’s who of 9/11 activists who are a league above me in caliber and output, but the subject interests me and I speak out. I am humbled to be among them.

I find the time spent listening to a lot of people a bit unwieldy and unfocused. [I’m a male; I don’t multi-task well, and I have a neuro-scientific appreciation for how multi-tasking diminishes critical attention.] The online discussion forum works differently, being asynchronous, and one can choose when and where to comment. I use my blog as a vehicle for response, especially its sister site The Sullen Bell, because it allows further time, freer expression, and the opportunity to note what others say to a wider audience.

[See especially http://www.thesullenbell.com/2016/09/01/bypassed-by-reality/:

“… I don’t care if my first responder rescuer brethren and the victims were blown up or down, by thermite or nukes, with Saudi or Israeli help; I want to see the perps walk to the gallows, and everyone who is or was complicit in the cover-up shunned for life….. Does 9/11 justice emanate from political struggle, legal maneuvering, or transformational thinking?… The 9/11 truth movement may well have been “caught responding to situations that have already changed”.]

The rules on what I may “export” from the list-serv where I have jump-started a discussion are murky and not in favor of easy cut-and-paste, though I am at liberty to copy my own comments.

Over there, there is a parallel discussion about the law, and limited legal liability, to which I responded:

Limited legal liability suggests impunity, and we’ve had a lot of that lately. People don’t get impunity and, if a corporation is a person, then a corporation shouldn’t get it either. But we are hanging in the wind with this whole thing, given the specter of the trade legislation that will give corporations global legal supremacy. Talking about the law is talking about politics and organizing political parties and movements that will rewrite (or kill) certain legislation, insure friendly judges, etc., and right now I don’t see any parties or movements (save possibly one, or its extension) that can muster the power (pun intended). Only the victors get to hold the trials and hang the perps. It’s been alluded to here before, and elsewhere with more interest and oomph, but the ability to exercise these kinds of major systemic change is implemented with the masses of people and/or the force of arms.

I’ve asked about (and await the YouTube recording from) the panel of legal experts at the recent conference in NYC. Do world courts have the legal power (and the other power to back up the legal power)?  Isn’t that a form of one world governance?

I posted the blurb about truth and reconciliation because I think the 9/11 truth movement (is that with a T or a t?) needs to have this discussion. Given the forthcoming election and the obvious attempts at bringing to the American people waves of cultural upheaval and violence, the looming possibilities of martial law or some variant thereof, etc., is it even worth having that discussion?

What is the reality on the streets, in the living rooms, on the stock exchanges and currency markets, and in armed state face-off with sovereign people and sovereign states?

Also on that discussion board, in another thread, is reference to the role of Judge Hellerstein’s role in preventing lawsuits relevant to 9/11 from coming to trial (hence no disclosure), and I’ve mentioned the role of Judge Stanley Sporkin in matters pertaining to the company and proprietary software seized from Catherine Austin Fitts, so be careful about going to court.

One of the problems in a cross-blog discussion is that it is sometimes not easy to back-check and read all the comment and responses to comments, a lapse on my part which was pointed out by GC.  I take no umbrage.  It’s simply the nature of asynchronous online discussion; people live in different time zones, and we all have more to our lives that that particular discussion.  Time allows us to knit together the ideas.

At the every end of my “white paper” on disasters, simulations and virtual communities, on the “about the author” page [that contact info is no longer valid], I noted my experience as an association executive, which entailed strategic leadership, lots of Board meetings, et al.  I marveled at but never found the skills exhibited by a Quaker physician I knew and revered who knew how to build consensus toward action. I’ve been a member of a now-defunct Virtual Community Working Group at learningtimes.net, was one of six beta-testers of the inaugural Internet-based “Game of Games”, and attended several online conferences on appreciative inquiry, as well as facilitating in an online world.  I designed a communications engine inside a theoretical simulation trainer that allowed people to take on differing perspectives and roles as a tool for surfacing ideas and difficult-to-find-facts and solutions.

Greencrow mentions the imminent election of Donald Trump. Meaning no disparagement of Greencrow or The Donald, that jury is still out on Donald’s access to the Oval Office, and the prospects of rigged election processes, some form of “October Surprise”, executive fiat, martial law, open warfare (internationally or civil), advancing severe weather/global warfare and even disclosure of the presence of extra-terrestrials remain on the horizon. Perhaps we’ve only been conditioned to think they are valid prospects, but lots of people are thinking they are valid.

Trump is no angel and is seen in some circles as being a “trojan horse” for the same interests who were allegedly behind 9/11, so don’t place faith in a politician the way so many did with Obama.  Obama was supposedly the antidote to the Bush dynasty, and Trump is seen as the only choice given the option of a Clinton/Obama dynasty. Just because Trump once alluded to 9/11 “truth”, be wary.  Allusion is closely related to illusion, and one of Trump’s supporters is Rudy Giuliani, a fellow any 9/11 activist knows is deeply implicated. By now we should have learned that they are all on the same team and, as George Carlin so nicely put it, we are not included. Our challenge is sometimes referred to as “herding cats”. But I do not wish to disagree with Greencrow so much as celebrate her inclusion in the discussion and her support in expanding that discussion.

Finally, GC said: “I appreciate the “Occurrences” Blog very much as it simplifies the daily task of getting an overview of geopolitical events from the alternative blog perspective AND it has an ecumenical approach, inclusive of the lesser known blogs like mine.”

I appreciate the comment very much.  It’s pretty much the nicest thing that’s been said about my labor of love, one of the reasons I climbed down off the hospital bed (and up off the floor) after I’d had a hemiplegic motor stroke. [Luckily, the event turned out to be positive and did not affect either my cognitive brain or my typing skills.]  GC’s comment is also a good summary of the intent of “Occurrences”.

It should be noted, for my general readers, that I am literally on the verge of completing my own personal living-space transformation. For the past two months, I’ve been doing what blogging I’ve been able to do using my wife’s MacAir, digging into her own writing time, because we bought our “forever” house.  The basement/office transformation is almost finished; my own iMac is functional, awaiting perhaps a transition to the new OS Sierra with Siri capacities (but I don’t think I want to import an open mike into my world), but it’s already capable of major blog production and more. Blog renewal time also approaches at the end of October (more about which later). The downstairs work space comes complete with a half-bath, a coffee bar, a pellet stove, safety rails for the stairways, my entire library, all of my logged music (including four days worth of jazz, rock and more), space for the air beds for the grandkids, two tables, lots of chairs, and my new photography tools. The windows look out (and the back stair/bulkhead opens out) onto a patio/garden/koi pond/waterfall complex with an overhead deck off the bedroom; you’ll find my wife in her gardener’s shed, in with the fishes, or in the garden. Tarzan knew where Jane wanted to go. It’s her reward after retiring from a 40-year career as a nurse during which she cared for her ailing mother (and now her nearly-disabled-but-miraculously-recovered black sheep of a husband). Which brings me to two last elements of the discussion about truth and reconciliation: love, and forgiveness.

Does it matter if we are Christian, or Buddhist, or something else?  My wife has taught me a lot about unconditional love. I have read a lot of Davd Ray Griffin, the theologian and expert on the topic of evil… I have read two books by the noted Catholic Worker James Douglass (JFK and the Unspeakable, at the end of which  — in the study guide edition— he talks a lot about evil, and more importantly his earlier book Resistance and Contemplation, the Trappist (Thomas Merton) root of his activism about nuclear weapons in which he talks about needing to be willing to go to jail, or die a horrible death at the hands of those opposed to truth). No one is suggesting that we all rush off to jail, but JFK asked if we believed in redemption just before he rode into the bullets.

One of the concerns that must be on the table is the extent to which our reconciliatory love bleeds over into giving permission for all the death and warfare that resulted, for the people important and minor who participated (does our grace extent to Abu Ghraib?), and becomes a quiet complicit celebration of militaristic ardor because we failed to differentiate or to hold people’s feet to the fire.

One of the more fascinating surprises for me was discovering a 9/11 activist who is also an ardent Constitutionalist who promotes a true understanding of the early legal meaning of the term “militia” at a time when actions aimed at the Second Amendment hang in the balance.

We would like to bring them to justice for treason; they call us “enemies of the state”.

The implications for 9/11 activism seem to be “all or nothing”: find the means to execute the perps mercifully or fugeddaboutit.

Who, in the end, is “the state”?  Our historical roots and documents speak about we the people.  I see little in the formational political literature of this nation in support of elitism, excess wealth, banking fraud, hijacked polity, oligarchy, dual citizenships, or the need for a hyper-security state.

I am still contemplating my own resistance.  My wife works diligently at shining her own little corner of the world, whether through flowers, or fishes, or grandchildren.  It is her maternal outlet, her paradisiacal escape, the creation impulse to which she can retreat when my own thoughts about things like 9/11 burst out into open conversation.

I write, read some more, contemplate, meditate, pray, breathe and write some more.

“A New Breed of Terrorism”

“a new breed of terrorism”

Fearing Americans are tiring of the war on terror, DHS creates “a  new breed of terrorism”

https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-5N21n-V2HEI/VsXPPOUHmlI/AAAAAAAAIlk/xAf4hgEpCow/s320/Veterans.jpg

image credit: Vetxprs

According to Courthouse News (CN) article, DHS Secretary Jeh Johnson warned law enforcement of a new breed of terrorism that sees people “self-radicalize.”

“As I have said many times, we are in a new phase of the global terrorist threat, requiring a whole new type of response,” Johnson said. “We have moved from a world of terrorist-directed attacks to a world that includes the threat of terrorist-inspired attacks.”

DHS propaganda is so unbelievable, they even have a guide book called “Terminology To Define Terrorists” which instructs them on how to use appropriate terminology when describing the latest terrorist threat.

DHS’s handbook exposes the war on terror for what it truly is; propaganda. Below are a few excerpts taken from DHS’s guide book “Expert Recommendation 7” section.

•The experts we consulted suggested defining the challenge of our times as “A Global Struggle for Security and Progress.” It is unlikely that this phrase will replace existing monikers such as “the war on terror” or “the long war,” which are more widely used both within and outside the government.

•Moreover, as a comprehensive descriptor, the phrase may not sufficiently reflect the need to promote public vigilance and rally support for the USG’s anti-terrorism mission.

• …the experts we consulted debated the word “liberty,” but rejected it because many around the world would discount the term as a buzzword for American hegemony. But all people want to support “progress,” which emphasizes that there is a path for building strong families and prosperity…

DHS wants police to detect terrorists in America.

Given the current threat environment, it is the cop on the beat that may be the first to detect the next terrorist attack in the United States,” Johnson said, quoting his speech at a New York City police graduation in December.

According to the CN article, DHS also wants communities to report suspicious people to the police.

The frontline of the fight against self-radicalized terror threats is not just tactical, Johnson said, noting that it also involves building law-enforcement relationships in communities, especially among Muslims.

“Well-informed families and communities are the best defense against terrorist ideologies,” Johnson said.

To that end, DHS has created an Office of Community Partnerships which encourages communities nationwide to spy for them!

“In this new Office, we will consolidate and reassign key personnel who are dedicated to countering violent extremism, but who are presently working in various different components of this Department. Longer term, we intend to call upon DHS personnel in field offices across the country to take part in our efforts at building community partnerships, under the coordination of this Office. The Office will coordinate its efforts with other departments and agencies in the federal government, and with similar efforts at the state and local government level.” 

DHS wants to spread their brand of fear (job security) to youth forums, town hall meetings, etc.,  by using DHS run “Community Engagement Roundtables.”

“Finally, DHS’s Office for Civil Rights and Civil Liberties (CRCL) has been integral in our efforts at engaging communities, and they will continue to be. Civil rights and civil liberties are invariably part of the discussion when this Department engages communities. CRCL will therefore participate with the Office for Community Partnerships when we engage communities. More specifically, as we enter this new phase of our efforts, CRCL will, in consultation with the Office for Community Partnerships, continue to lead, improve and expand this Department’s community engagements, including Community Engagement Roundtables, Town Hall Meetings, and Youth Forums across the country.”

DHS’s ‘Community Engagement Roundtables’ are law enforcement’s propaganda machine.

“These events range from public town halls on current incidents or issues to focused meetings and listening sessions with targeted stakeholders to include religious leaders, recent immigrants, law enforcement, local government, disability groups, etc. As a result of these consultations, we have received valuable input on DHS policy and also developed products to facilitate communication with diverse communities; including a guide on appropriate terminology to use when describing the terrorist threat.”

Politicians want the Feds to spy on social media:

Politicians Use Scare Tactics To Promote Government Spying

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=alYOcdoSqmM

<dDept. is spying on our social media.

The Immigration department reviews social media accounts of higher-risk refugees, though the long-term goal is to search the accounts of everyone seeking refugee status, according to Leon Rodriguez, director of U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services.

Keeping the fear alive, committee chairman Michael McCaul wants every person applying for a U.S. visa to go through social media screening (surveillance).

The American Police State is so paranoid they even suspect innocent people.

“Rep. Lamar Smith asked how the DHS would handle refugees who have a clean slate, meaning there is no information on them from intelligence agencies — though this does not necessarily indicate innocence, he said.”

DHS wants people who have not committed a “serious crime to come out of the shadows” and report themselves to law enforcement!

“Johnson went on to say President Barack Obama and the department are encouraging people who have lived in the country, are parents of U.S. citizens, and have not committed a serious crime to “come out of the shadows” and ask for deferred action on their immigration status.”

With each passing day, law enforcement is becoming more and more like the Gestapo and the NKVD.

Posted by mapi at 9:42 AM

via

http://www.blacklistednews.com/ 

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‘See Something Suspicious Online? Homeland Security Wants to Know About It’

February 18th, 2016 by Kevin

http://www.cryptogon.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/terror-all.jpg

Via: NextGov:

The Department of Homeland Security wants an extra $1 million next year to develop a public-service campaign designed to increase awareness of online threats. The new initiative will be modeled on the “If You See Something, Say Something” effort rolled out after the Sept. 11 attacks.

The new cyber PSA “will look to raise public and private sector awareness of cybersecurity and to emphasize the importance of cyber awareness and information safekeeping,” according to an explanation of the project in fiscal 2017 budget documents released last week.

DHS will work with state and local governments, law enforcement agencies, academic institutions and private sector companies as part of the campaign, according to budget documents.

The original “See Something, Say Something” first debuted in the New York City in 2002 in the aftermath of the 9/11 terror attacks to raise awareness of suspicious activity that could be related to terrorist activity.

Posted in Dictatorship, Social Engineering, Surveillance, Technology

woman’s touch

A Woman’s Touch

Here’s a re-post of an article I wish I had written myself (although I would not have used the word “ironic”).  

It expresses a philosophy I’ve long thought about as I’ve seen powerful women at work/play; I’ve been married to one who raised her daughter to be one (and succeeded). 

I believe that strength and power can be gentle without giving up firmness of resolve or fierceness if and when necessary. 

 

 

 

The Most Beautiful Women in the World Are Invisible

by Jack Balkwill / August 27th, 2015

The first time, ever I saw your face,

I thought the sun rose in your eyes

And the moon and the stars were the gifts you gave

to the dark and the endless skies”

— Ewan MacColl

We live in a culture that promotes images of beautiful women everywhere we look.  Turn on the TV and commercials feature super models standing beside products the capitalists want us to buy.  Step outside and you see them on billboards doing same.  Online they lurk at the outer edges of our screen, sirens luring us to purchase sports cars, perfume, or smart phones.

But the attention falls short of the most beautiful women in the world, who are involved with making a better world.  We do not see them on our TVs, billboards, or mainstream media web pages.

Ironically, the jobs which contribute the most toward making a better world usually pay the tiniest fraction of what a super model makes, and require one to do without material things. We see more women than men in both doing this kind of work and providing the leadership in the social justice movement, environmental movement, peace movement and other magnificent causes.

It shouldn’t be a surprise to those who watch women performing heroic acts daily all over the world that they take on jobs to make our world better, and is a remarkable compliment to the female gender.

Every day, unseen in distant places, women give their last food to children and die of starvation, an act as courageous as any other, although we almost never hear their names, as a child dies of hunger-related causes every ten seconds.  Overlooking this, our popular movies generally depict male characters as the heroes.

Last week two women completed Army Ranger training and received headlines throughout the mainstream press, even as thousands of female heroes remain nameless.

It is ironic that women receive recognition when they perform as trained killers rather than at their more traditional, nurturing roles.

I have mixed feelings about this Ranger achievement.  On the one hand I want women to reach high goals and lead fulfilled lives.  I want women to be president, chief justice of the Supreme Court, and attain other high offices.  On the other hand I don’t think women are advanced by becoming elite assassins.

I’ve long believed, as is said in Eastern philosophy, that gender balance is best for harmony in the universe.  It should not be thought of as an end goal that there are more women in the US Congress than ever before, but that the goal should be that it become fully half female, so we have very far to go.

But in wanting a female president of the USA, we shouldn’t want a militant Margaret Thatcher, called by a Soviet journalist “The Iron Lady,” nor a Golda Meir, called by Former Israeli Prime Minister David Ben-Gurion “The best man in government.”

It is disgusting that women are asked to be manly before they can be recognized as good leaders.  This seems to me to be a test that rules out most of the best females.  Of course, the manly test is really to judge whether these leaders are ruthless enough to slaughter the enemies of the ruling oligarchs and plutocrats, as male leaders are traditionally tasked.

I would love to see a president of the United States who was a traditional female, nurturing our dysfunctional planet.  She would be skilled at demilitarizing and negotiating peace, cleaning up the environment, feeding the hungry, healing the sick and bringing the people of the world together in harmony.  She wouldn’t care at all if those in power called her soft or emotional, she would see that as a strength.

When people accuse women of being too emotional to hold high office, they ignore reality.  How often have we seen, just prior to going to war, male leaders rattling the saber and emotionally screaming out for war?  I believe it is a myth that women are more emotional, we are simply taught in our youth to display our emotions more openly if female, and hide them if male.

As a combat vet, I would much prefer to see a female leader shedding tears at the thought of our going to war than a jingoist John McCain emotionally shouting out his desire to obliterate a nation in the way of capitalist greed, burning their crops and slaughtering their children as realistically happens in war.

It would be wonderful if girls today had as a role model a powerful female who was courageous enough to stand for world peace, a clean planet, and a fair distribution of wealth, a woman like Jill Stein who is running for president without a single word from the entire mainstream press, all determined that such a person will not be seen by the masses.

Instead, corporate media give us Hillary Clinton, who voted for war with Iraq as a Senator and encouraged the slaughter of thousands in Libya and Syria (among other nations) as Secretary of State.  From the Republican side we are given massive coverage of Carly Fiorina, who laid off 30,000 people in her company, damning their hopes.  These are women with the mentality of Army Rangers, able to cut throats as coldly as any man, the obvious reason they are recognized as qualified in a patriarchal system serving plutocrats.

In Eastern philosophy the female energy, yin, is opposite the male energy, yang, but just as powerful.  It is thought that when the two are given equal representation, there is harmony.  When too much power resides in one of them, there is chaos.

There should be no doubt that our world is in chaos today, but there is hope, because of the most beautiful women in the world.

Jack Balkwill is an activist in Virginia. He can be reached at libertyuv@hotmail.com Read other articles by Jack.

This article was posted on Thursday, August 27th, 2015 at 7:43pm and is filed under Culture, Gender, Opinion.

http://dissidentvoice.org/2015/08/the-most-beautiful-women-in-the-world-are-invisible/#more-59598 

 

 

http://quotespictures.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/the-world-will-change-when-women-reclaim-their-power-as-the-sane-nurturing-hands-of-love-which-are-ever-reaching-to-cultivate-a-world-of-beauty-safety-and-harmony.jpg

 

Reading Jack’s article brings to mind a striking book by Mary Catherine Bateson called “Composing a Life” in which the art-form of home-making comes to the fore. She talks about  the autopoietic nature of life’s transitions and interactions through a “case study” of five women’s lives.

Composing_a_Life is, ironically enough, a book championed by Hilary Clinton.  Where and how did Hilary alter her approach?

You keep a house, but you make a home.

“… In Dr. Bateson’s parlance, homemaking  is not so much about decoration and renovation. Rather, it’s a metaphor for community, for the design of an environment — professional or domestic or societal — that challenges and supports its inhabitants….”

http://www.sophisticateddorkiness.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/WordItOut-word-cloud-640413-e1420500466947.jpg

 

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“…I know it ain’t much; it needs a woman’s touch….” 

 

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An entire library of books at Amazon on parenting 

 

[Ed.: I was lucky to have gotten beyond parenting without having done any serious damage to either my kids or myself or my spouse, thanks to the Grace of God and a wonderful mate.  These kinds of resources did not exist much then, except for an occasional something from Dr. Spock or some other pediatrician.  Mostly I learned through observation, making mental notes of what not to do. If you order through this link, a small slice of the proceeds goes to the benefit of a farmlet in New Zealand and the small and deserving band of humans who take care of themselves, their animals and the land there.]

 

The featured image at the top was taken from http://www.cloisteredaway.com/category/our-home/ 

“At the end of last year, my husband and I began to evaluate our home-life, looking to mend the connections, relationally and practically, that had been neglected and strained during all of our change the last few years. Our family table seemed to be a simple place to begin, a place that we all longed for and needed for its regular meals and togetherness. Like few other things, the table nurtures and nourishes us. It cultivates story and memory with one another. It reminds us, even in a ten minute lunch, how to pause and receive. Below I wrote out some of the ways we’re reprioritizing this space and using our time around the table together…..”