Tag Archives: consciousness

photon eyes

photon eyes

Why Losing a Dog Can Be Harder Than Losing a Relative or Friend | Alternet

Posted by Michele Kearney at 2:01 PM 

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You Are Not Your Brain 

By Jeffrey M. Schwartz and Rebecca Gladding

Overactive brain circuits can often lead to bad habits, compulsive actions, and anxieties. In this illuminating read, two neuroscience experts deliver a simple four-step method to overcome these destructive impulses and live a more fulfilling, well-balanced life.

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/9902541-you-are-not-your-brain 

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Hymns to the Silence 

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“… if you take the 14th verse out of each of John’s 21 chapters and string them together, you end up with a very interesting overview of the entire gospel–an overview that sort of rushes by you like a swift-running brook…..”

https://richardedmondson.net/2017/03/12/living-water-the-14sof-john/ 

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AFTER LAST WEEK’S VAULT 7 RELEASE

THIS MAY BE A BIT LATE

A hand-picked list of must-watch cybersecurity videos to help you learn the fundamentals of encryption, how hackers penetrate systems, and strong cyber-defense tactics for business.

http://www.techrepublic.com/article/learn-cybersecurity-basics-with-these-essential-youtube-videos 

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This seems to be a particular popular post and so …

http://boydownthelane.com/2016/05/19/authentic-conversation/ 

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A recent writing prompt exercise built on the word “boat”

My legs are not sea legs. Looking back over seven decades from within the experience of hip arthritis, muscular issues that are related to a motor stroke and a weak heart that cause me to walk slowly and awkwardly, I think that sometimes it’s all because of an internal balance mechanism that was damaged by an inner ear infection as a child, or perhaps that time when I was six that I fell face first onto the edge of a concrete step, but my first realization that I was not going to be a boatsman was at camp when I flipped the canoe.  Flipped the canoe and the counselor too.

Luckily it was shallow, summertime, and he had long legs and some experience; I moved on to archery and capture-the-flag.

http://ir0.mobify.com/900/http://catchboynton.com/images/Boynton%20Harbor%20Marina/e6b24df417ad7ceb7a489b8a35382a8c_XL%20Medium.jpg

My second encounter with a boat was in Florida at the age of nine or so after my step-mother, brother and sister and I drove down to see some rich old distant relative about some family business and we got the treat of a sport fishing trip out of Boynton Beach, Florida. We were going to catch a boat load of swordfish and whatnot.

The rig we were on was bigger and heavier than a canoe and much more stable, and under the command of a bonafied cap’n with one name and some other fellow who handled the rods and the bait.  As the youngest, I waited and did what I was told, sat in the seat, buckled the belt, and watched the fellow put something on the hook.  He stuck the rod into a metal pipe that I straddled in my seat and out of the harbor we chugged on a cool sunny morning through the briny breezes out into the Gulf Stream. Big brother and sister were ready too, and Mom, and before you knew it, we were way out beyond the ability to see land, looking for fish.

As a nine-year-old, I had no clue about how to look for fish.  I could barely see over the side of the boat, the stern’s gunwale, and anyway the fish were in the water.

But someone could see the fish and knew where and how to find them and find them we did. Lots of them. Pointy sleek little buggers, not much to them… Not at all like those big spear-tipped things whose pictures you could see back at the dock with the lucky person who caught it, big smiles on both the man and the fish, though I couldn’t understand what the fish had to smile about.

http://www.onthewater.com/assets/Capt-Lou-and-Capt-Jack-Swordie-on-Scale-1.jpg

We were catching buckets of bonito.

At least they were.  I had one bite but not much more.

The one-named cap’n and his mate were cheering us on, telling the rest of my family that catching bonito was okay, that they could be sold for money at the dock, and that where there were bonito, there was gonna be a swordfish, or mackerel, or maybe barracuda.

They were capn’s and such, and they knew about these things, so I kept reeling and bobbing and getting a fierce sunburn.  We had four or five white buckets filled with bonito and some were flopping around on the decks wet with seawater and bait.

http://www.hooked-in.com/system/catch/photo/5827/days_catch.jpg?1348287743

Then we found ourselves in some waves. I don’t know what or where, but the cap’n was in charge and we drove on, up and down. Soon enough as the boat went up and down, so did my stomach, and breakfast came up when the boat went down, and whatever I had for legs turned into jell-o, and soon enough I was curled into a ball of seasickness and tucked back into a dark corner under an old blanket, to ride with the future catfood back into the harbor.  I was a complete wreck and had to be helped back to the car; they lay me down on the back seat and I woke up somewhere in North Carolina.

http://woodyboater.wpengine.netdna-cdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/Rochester-Chuckle.jpg

The next encounter with a boat was way up north.  We’d driven forever on some highways until, finally, we crested the hill and you could see — way down at the bottom of the hill — a river and a town. Soon enough, we were on the docks and getting on a polished mahogany “heavy cruiser”.  I was the guest of a classmate and his older sister, given the opportunity to spend a few days on an island in the middle of about a thousand other islands, some big, some small, some with glorious houses, this one a sizeable estate of a very wealthy family.

https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/564x/4e/e5/1a/4ee51afef495722867ce3d4de848c778.jpg

We played stickball on the clay tennis courts in our bare feet and I ripped the toenail off my big toe trying to get to second base.  In the afternoon, we paired off in St. Lawrence skiffs. Everyone in the islands had one, or two, or three of these little boats, and afternoons up there in the summer were devoted to sailing and playing a game of shipboard tag.

http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1088/1133004983_706d9e316d.jpg

The skipper of the boat sat in the back and handled the rudder and the sail; the cap’n’s mate had three and a half tasks.  Being the landlubber with no experience, my responsibility was to pull the centerboard up or down according to the cap’n’s commands, to get out of the way of the boom by ducking under it, and to keep my weight (the ballast) tucked down into the well somewhere close to or ahead of the mast. Moving around to either side on the the cap’n’s commands was a secondary method by which he steered. He steered with several purposes. The first was not to get run over by the big freighters.

http://en.es-static.us/upl/2013/06/ship-st-lawrence-seaway-e1371685675461.jpg

Generally this was not a problem. They stayed in their lanes, and we stayed out of them.  But they couldn’t turn easily or stop suddenly, and they were a lot bigger.  In our little wooden boats, we theoretically could turn easily and, if the wind was right and the cap’n knew what he or she was doing, we could scoot to safety.

The second reason to steer was to avoid getting hit by the tennis balls.  All those old tennis balls from tennis and stickball went to use.

Each boat was given two of them, and a pole with a net. At the beginning of the inter-islands pre-teen pick-up regatta, called to order perhaps with a couple of blasts on an air horn by some grown-up in a motor boat at precisely (or approximately) 2 PM, one of the boats was designated “it”.

In this game, unlike tag on land, you want to be “it”, because when you were “it”, either the skipper or the mate inn other boats could stand up and throw one of their tennis balls at your sail. If they succeeded in hitting the sail, they were “it” and everyone would now aim for them.

But throwing a tennis ball with any kind of accuracy while you are standing and trying to maintain balance in a narrow boat is not an easy task.  You missed a lot. And you ran out of balls quickly.

No problem.  All those misses were bobbing in the water in their bright yellowness against the background of blue with white foam, just waiting for you (or perhaps the better, faster boat) to sail over there and scoop it out of the water with the net.

Sometimes if you were very lucky, you could stand up, avoid falling in, and use your net like a lacrosse goalie to fend off approaching yellow bomblets.

Remember, though, I had a balance problem, so I stayed pretty much safely tucked in under the boom, clutching the mast.  The waters were not choppy so there were no problems with nausea and vomiting; I just didn’t want to fall in.

Oh, I could swim, and we all had life-jackets anyway. But the skipper’s job of skipping is much more difficult when the ballast is floating overboard and he has to maneuver around so it can be recovered, losing precious time not spent throwing or retriving bobbing wet yellow rubbery furballs.

Now the object of the game, which was over when the air horn blasted again at precisely (or approximately) 4 PM, was to have collected the most tennis balls. The bottom of the winner’s boat was awash with bright yellowness. And everyone got a good suntan, and a lot of experience handling a sailing boat.  After dinner, everyone crowded into a motor boat and went over to another island to roast marshmallows and watch the Northern Lights.

http://www.visit1000islands.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/Camping-1.jpg

The last encounter with a boat started back down in Florida. We’d won one of those quick out-and-back cruises because we said we’d sit still long enough to hear the sales pitch for a time-share. Weakly we finally succumbed and bought a week in October on the inner eastern edge of the Everglades; it took us close to two decades to finally dump the sucker, never once having been visited, traded, shared or even given away. It was like detaching a blood-sucking leech, but I digress.

We parked the car and grabbed the bags and smiled at the photographer on the gangplank.  We found the room with a small porthole, dropped the gear, and did the mandatory “abandon ship” drills.  Then we explored the boat.

As you probably know, cruises are mostly about eating, and so we ate and drank our way out to the Bahamas, never getting off or even seeing them in the dark, and then turning back in to the south.

In the morning, we awoke to a half-day onshore in Key West.  I spent a lot of time on deck.  Very stable, and slow… Pulling into port and docking was a trip.  We saw a bunch of islands owned by big-named celebrity types, did the tourist-y thing downtown, and passed the first test of not misssing the boat when it departed, again in a slow and stately fashion.  Then the cap’n picked up the pace and we waved at the Dry Tortugas on the right, Cuba way off to the left, and settled in as we drove deep into the Gulf (pre-Halliburton blowout and Corexit spray).  We had a day on Cozumel which we spent taking the bus down to Tulum and getting the full tour.

http://reviewscancun.com/wp-content/gallery/tulumruins/tulumruins.jpg

We experienced hot, several iguana, and a good dose of Mayan pride. The bus ride to and from was at least 90 minutes. The trip back to the dock in Cozumel to the mainland was aboard a fast catamaran that, despite its double-hulled stability, was a litle choppy. We got an evening to stroll around the tourist shops in Cozumel. The trip back on the cruise ship was a day of sunny delight.  After dinner, we turned in knowing that we’d be docking again in Fort Lauderdale in the morning. The big ship had massive hull stabilizers but we hit that same spot offshore where the bonito swam, and there was a spot of queasiness made worse if I peered out the little porthole.

http://www.hgifllairport.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/bigstock-Cruise-ships-at-port-of-Miami-68539387_reduced.jpg

But we landed without incident, debarked, got our luggage loaded, and headed north in a nice stable wide-stance Pontiac TransAm. I got my backside into a bucket seat with a steering wheel in my hands and all was well. There was no motion sickness at 75 in the passing lane back then.

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http://writershelpingwriters.net/ 

offers up the opportunity to purchase

a unique set of articles, tools and more for writers.

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https://i0.wp.com/www.brainpickings.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/friendorfoe3.jpg?resize=768%2C409&ssl=1

Friend of Foe?: A Lovely Illustrated Fable About Making Sense of Otherness

A playful illustrated inquiry into whether mutual attentiveness is enough to dissolve enmity into friendship.

https://www.brainpickings.org/2017/02/28/friend-of-foe? 

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Also from 

brainpickings.org 

“… Beloved Prophet is a gorgeous read in its totality. Complement this particular portion with Virginia Woolf on the epiphany in which she understood what it means to be an artist, then revisit Gibran on the seeming self vs. the authentic self and the difficult balance of intimacy and independence in love…..”

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The Awakening

Quantum Mechanics of the Human Brain & Consciousness

49:30

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x2baCg8SHGM&t=6s 

Flash Quiz Tomorrow!

enchanting creativity

enchanting creativity

“An important part of a product launch is the press release. It announces what the product is going to be and some key features that make it stand apart from all the rest. But how do you focus in on one of the best aspects of the product in a way that won’t seem too contrived? The solution that Colle+McVoy found for their client Cub Cadet …” is described in this Visual News piece on press releases. 

source of featured graphic

https://www.amazon.com/Enhancing-Creativity-Steven-Halpern/dp/B000003IUC 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H10f2w7T5CU 

 

https://www.quora.com/The-Universe/Hypothetically-if-there-is-intelligent-alien-life-with-the-knowledge-and-means-to-traverse-space-and-travel-to-Earth-what-would-be-their-reasons-for-not-making-contact-Please-read

SERIOUS PHOTOGRAPHERS KNOW that even the best camera phones can’t compete with a DSLR. Provided you know how to use one, that is. The myriad knobs, dials, and settings can intimidate casual users, which explains why two-thirds of non-professionals rarely use anything but full-auto mode. The slick interactive visualization Photography Mapped can help those people master their camera.

https://www.wired.com/2016/12/photography-mapped-Learn How To Use A DSLR Camera, With This Nifty Web Tool 

 

https://www.visualnews.com/2013/12/29/pantone-perfection-color-palettes-nature/ 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mQpwDtIn4ec 

 

http://imgs.xkcd.com/comics/ui_change.png 

 

Become a Piano Superhuman

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC1V2zI_VQ5et66WtKXhAXXA 

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V1Tr1qCHwq4 

 

 

The Best Science Books of 2016

“I have long believed that E.B. White’s abiding wisdom on children’s books — “Anyone who writes down to children is simply wasting his time. You have to write up, not down.” — is equally true of science books. The question of what makes a great book of any kind is, of course, a slippery one, but I recently endeavored to synthesize my intuitive system for assessing science books that write up to the reader in a taxonomy of explanation, elucidation, and enchantment

https://i1.wp.com/www.brainpickings.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/enchanters.jpg?resize=680%2C519 

Gathered here are exceptional books that accomplish at least two of the three, assembled in the spirit of my annual best-of reading lists, which I continue to consider Old Year’s resolutions in reverse — not a list of priorities for the year ahead, but a reflection on the reading most worth prioritizing in the year being left behind…..” 

If you have not yet subscribed to the weekly “BrainPickings” newsletter, you should hasten to do so. 

 

http://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/growing-up-in-a-library-is-exactly-as-magical-as-you-would-imagine 

 

https://www.visualnews.com/2016/12/07/how-to-write-awesome-video-script-8-steps/ 

 

“… Creating involves new space and new time. I often use the metaphor of the painter to explain this. The painter views the blank canvas as the place where he will build up his own version of space and time.

And when the canvas is finished, he hangs it on a wall. His space and time are now inserted into physical reality.

The painting could be any enterprise: a business, an adventure in a far-flung place; a new relationship; a deep investigation of a mystery…

In each case, the person is projecting his own space and time into the physical world—and the physical world accepts them without question.

The act of projecting is mental, emotional, physical, and spiritual.

There are degrees of projecting—degrees of power.

In creating new reality, executing details requires a sense of logic.

Once upon a time, in medieval universities, new students enrolled in the Trivium. It was the foundation curriculum. It was required. Its parts were: grammar, logic, and rhetoric.

Grammar: the interior construction of language.

Logic: the valid and invalid connections in the course of a formal argument; the method of proper reasoning; the deductive links in a chain, at the end of which appears a conclusion.

Rhetoric: oral and written presentation; the use of language to make a case; the capacity to persuade, even in the face of counter-argument.

Today, the subject matter of the Trivium is not only downplayed. It has been shattered.….”

https://jonrappoport.wordpress.com/2016/12/08/power-outside-the-matrix-inserting-your-space-and-time-into-physical-reality-2/ 

 

New Experiments Show Consciousness Affects Matter ~ Dean Radin Ph.D [42 minutes]

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nRSBaq3vAeY 

 

 

“Why do you have your beliefs? Who taught them to you and why do you hold it within you? How do you perceive yourself? How do you perceive others? Do you want to learn more about the world you experience and live in? Is there a habit you want to break? Listen to this and get an idea of consciousness. Old knowledge with a new perspective.”

Dr. Joe Dispenza is the speaker. [Audio: 48 minutes]

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l1NrSvY2lz4 

bipedal sentient Petri

bipedal sentient Petri

Long-time readers of BoyDownTheLane know that I am deeply interested in the capacities and capabilities of the human mind.

This is reflected in my e-book “Summon The Magic” and the fact that I retain and continue to delve into many of the ideas and texts it describes.  Certainly meditation is on the list.

 

Musical backdrop?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7zh0-T0efTY&list=RD7zh0-T0efTY#t=1 

 

I have had some experience with binaural-beats-guided audiated meditation, HoloSync to be more specific.  I have had some experience, indirectly and directly, with the ways in which the human mind can be used by its owner for healing purposes. When I was hospitalized, I had a personal experience with the power of will in that I literally willed a temporarily-frozen left lower extremity to lift itself off the hospital bed mattress. (It should be noted that that evolution took a concerted and repeated effort over the course of two and a half days.) The technique was suggested to me by my son, who had read and explored a bit of my e-book, and who had talked to a PGA pro who had had a similar medical incident. It’s funny how things come back around.  One of the doctors who cared for me observed that I had taught my son who in turn taught me. But I remember the excitement with which I demonstrated my “athletic feat” to doctors, nurses and therapists.

Readers know, too, that I like to share the meat and potatoes of my personal learning curves with the knowledge that somewhere out there is someone who will benefit. I try extra hard not to present myself as the expert, merely the bipedal sentient Petri dish into which learning and experience is inserted.  I learn something along the way, to be sure, but it takes a while for me to delve deeply into the book, video, topic, technique etc. and, like anyone else, sometimes I get distracted, demotivated, or something else becomes more of a priority. If I live to be 150, I might be able to finish the material I have assembled. And there are days in which some of the material is simply too dense to be consumed meaningfully.  Tomorrow, however….

And long-term readers know that I have danced with a long-term cardiac condition.  So when the brain meets up with the heart….

Recently I had the opportunity to meet a fellow who is a very unique being. He is a holistic psychiatrist. He researches, writes about, explores and makes movies about the capacity of the human brain to affect the body and the world it finds itself in. The movie I speak of is “The Joy of Sox: Weird Science and the Power of Intention”, a DVD copy of which he gifted me. Mr. and Mrs. Blogger are avid (in her case, diehard) Red Sox fans and baseball nuts. See http://www.thejoyofsoxmovie.com for more information.

The very unique being I speak of is a “board certified psychiatrist with the Pain Management Program at Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital in Boston, Dr. Leskowitz has an appointment with the Department of Psychiatry of Harvard Medical School, directs the hospital’s Integrative Medicine Task Force, and has several conferences on the topic of Complementary and Alternative Medicine in Rehabilitation. He edited a recent text of the same name (Churchill Livingstone, 2003), and has written and lectured widely on the field of energy medicine. His September 2005 Op-Ed in the Boston Globe, “Can Weird Science Save the Sox?” started the process that culminated in The Joy of Sox. Read more about Rick and his work in alternative medicine at his website www.EnergyMedicine101.com.”

Here is his article on The Role of Mindfullness, Meditation and Prayer after Brain Injury .

He is a member of The Sports Energy Group.

Here is an interview he did on the use of energy psychology and the alleviation of pain.

For $75, you can get a copy of the 200+ page book he edited in 2009 entitled “Transpersonal Hypnosis: Gateway to Body, Mind and Spirit”. Go here to bookdepository.com.  The book presents “a multidimensional, energy-based view of human awareness that integrates disparate biological, psychological, and spiritual therapeutic techniques. Each of the chapters – all from world-renowned contributors – includes both a historical overview and the theory behind the development of each technique. The authors emphasize experimental studies that examine the validity of using hypnotically accessed transpersonal states of consciousness to heal the body, mind, and spirit. Several clinical vignettes highlight the types of medical and psychological symptoms responsive to these approaches. The emerging field of spiritually-influenced treatments is transforming the practice of medicine.”

This link ( http://www.healingisfreedom.com/science/autoimmune-depression-10-science-based-strategies-feel-better-fast/ ), useful in many ways, has a section in which Dr. Leskowitz explains and introduces “tapping”, a technique employed by athletes and others. There’s a demo video at the link.

Here are two more links on tapping:

http://www.thetappingsolution.com/blog/lissa-rankin-must-watch/ 

http://www.thetappingsolution.com/what-is-eft-tapping/ 

Here are two books recommended for reading for students who take a course on health psychology taught at Brandeis:

Richard O. Straub (2014) Health Psychology: A Biopsychosocial Approach, 4th edition. New York: Worth Publishers ISBN: 978-1-4641-0937-9

Robert M. Sapolsky (2004) Why Zebras Don’t Get Ulcers, 3rd edition, Holt Paperbacks, New York; ISBN-13: 978-0805073690

The Harvard Medical School newsletter “Healthbeat” has an issue devoted to  anxiety and physical illness.

The world-famous Lown Institute ( http://lowninstitute.org ) is just down the street from where my old office was when I used to coordinate satellite TV-based continuing medical education in the fields of pediatrics and orthopedics. (The start-up venture went bust, but the boy born upstairs at the old Lying-In Institute at Brigham and Women’s just got named the Northeast Sales Manager for a new West Coast golf apparel chain.)  I urge you to read about the founder, Bernard Lown, the depth and breadth of the institute he founded, and more.  There is expertise there in health care, especially in cardiovascular medicine, that can’t be bested. There are publications, tools, news and more for you.

Dr. Lown maintains his own blog: https://bernardlown.wordpress.com.

To learn more about the intersection of behavior and cardiovascular health, go here: https://www.questia.com/library/3640527/handbook-of-psychology-and-health-cardiovascular.

Lown himself as an e-book on biological and psychological factors in disease. Further searching will allow you to find material on the topic of neuropsychiatric factors in cardiovascular disease, as well as info on Dr. Dean Ornish ( http://deanornish.com ).

 

Biological and Psychological Factors in Cardiovascular Disease – Google Books cardiovascular and psychiatric FAQ_Ornish_Program_8.19.14 cardiovascular and psychiatric FAQ_Ornish_Program_8.19.14  

 

FAQ_Ornish_Program_8.19.14 

 

 

 

 

DESIGN

Here’s the Brutally Honest Truth About the Creative Process

https://www.wired.com/2016/12/sunday-sketching-christoph-niemann-tells-brutal-truth-creative-process/ 

 

http://images.crateandbarrel.com/is/image/Crate/VivMartinis8SHF15/$web_product_hero$&/150817160027/viv-martini-glasses-set-of-eight.jpg

“What is an “eight-martini” result? 

“Well, this is an intelligence community in-house term for remote viewing data so good that it cracks everyone’s realities. So they have to go out and drink eight martinis to recover”.

– Ingo Swann

Eight martinis is a magazine dedicated to the pursuit and the application of the Art of Remote Viewing. Each Issue we present Remote Viewing sessions & examples, projects, news and theories from some of the leading Remote Viewing practitioners and thinkers.

The magazine currently comes in two formats; a FREE download as an Adobe pdf file and as a Full color printed and delivered to your door – magazine.

Eight martinis recently applied for and recieved an ISSN. (International Standard Serial Number). The ISSN is the standardized international code which allows the identification of any serial publication, including electronic serials, independently of its country of publication, of its language or alphabet, of its frequency, or medium.

eight martinis ISSN numbers are:

Eight martinis (Print) ISSN 2045-2462

Eight martinis (Online) ISSN 2045-2470

 

Issues, posts and more at the link:

http://www.eightmartinis.com 

 

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-8gCJRbg3Sw8/UPyZrrmUhoI/AAAAAAAAC4M/5iyZWe3zhZs/s400/%25E2%2580%259CThe%2Btwo%2Bmost%2Bimportant%2Bdays%2Bin%2Byour%2Blife%2Bare%2Bthe%2Bday%2Byou%2Bare%2Bborn%2Band%2Bthe%2Bday%2Byou%2Bfind%2Bout%2Bwhy.%25E2%2580%259D%2B-Mark%2BTwain2.jpg

THE AWAKENING – Quantum Mechanics of the Human Brain & Consciousness

[50 minutes]

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x2baCg8SHGM 

expect a quiz tomorrow

 

 

 

Source of featured entry masthead image: 

http://www.corespirit.com/scientists-discover-off-switch-human-consciousness-deep-within-brain/ 

Extra image from the same article:

http://www.corespirit.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/08/claustrum.jpg 

AI for bipeds

AI for bipeds

Google has released a handful of AI experiments that tap into advances in machine learning in creative ways.

They include Quick, Draw!, a game in which an algorithm tries to guess what you’re sketching, A.I. Duet, which lets you compose pieces of music with a creative computer, and ways to visualize how neural networks represent information and see the world.

The projects show off some new AI features Google has built into an overhauled cloud computing platform. But they also help make AI less mysterious, and hint at ways in which the technology may become more accessible to all of us.

Take Quick, Draw!, for example. You have 20 seconds to draw six simple objects, and a computer tries to guess what you’re working on in the allotted time. Under the hood, the game runs a learning system that Google uses for character recognition. The system analyzes not only the shape, but also the strokes you used to draw it. It’s a neat way to understand a machine-learning approach that’s used by millions on their smartphones. It’s also quite addictive, even if it always seems to mistake my ducks for potatoes.

In in A.I. Duets, you get to make music with an algorithm. Through an effort called Project Magenta, Google researchers are exploring ways of using neural networks to mimic human creativity. The results are fascinating, especially because how musical creativity works remains rather mysterious. Part of the motivation for Google’s project, indeed, is exploring human intelligence by copying its musicality.

Among the projects aimed at elucidating the inner workings of neural networks is one called Visualizing High Dimensional Space. Created by several experts in data visualization, this effort shows how a large neural network stores and draws connections between different pieces of data.

The results are often beautiful, but they also highlight one way that we might be able to understand powerful machine-learning systems that would normally be inscrutable.

This could be pretty important for everyone. Imagine, for example, an algorithm that just flagged an apparently healthy patient as likely to develop a particular disease. The ability to inspect a network’s inner connections could make that decision less difficult to understand, and make treatment easier to justify.

So if you want to understand the revolution in machine intelligence that’s upending just about every industry, Google’s online AI laboratory is well worth a visit.

(Read more: A.I. Experiments, Silicon Angle, “OK, Computer, Write Me A Song,” “The Hit Charade,” “AI’s Language Problem”)

by Will Knight November 18, 2016

https://www.technologyreview.com/s/602941/want-to-understand-ai-try-sketching-a-duck-for-a-neural-network/MIT 

Learn more about artificial intelligence at EmTech Digital 2017.

Register now 

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source of featured image

http://www.pcmag.com/news/347944/salesforce-brings-artificial-intelligence-to-crm-with-einste 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XADcSAyjFOo

On September 20, 2016, Accenture Strategy presented Symphonologie: The Music of Business debuted at the Louvre Museum in Paris. This unique sensory experience featured a full orchestra performing a 3-movement symphony inspired by the top stories of business and technology and interpreted though artificial intelligence. Symphonologie was brought to life by a team of strategists, creative technologists and musicians, and designed to reveal how strategy and technology together can unlock a new way to view the world. Learn more at http://www.symphonologie.com/

See also http://www.cbsnews.com/news/orchestra-music-symphonologie-by-artificial-intelligence-human-composers/

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http://www.learnartificialneuralnetworks.com/ai.html 

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You can have a conversation with an AI bot here: http://alice.pandorabots.com 

 

 

http://www.chatterbotcollection.com/images/FakeCaptainKirk.jpg

Here was my conversation with Captain Kirk:

 

Lieutenant: I am a bosun’s mate in training 

James T. Kirk: I know you are. 

Lieutenant: how long will my training take> 

James T. Kirk: Hopefully not too much longer. 

Lieutenant: It is difficult to learn this material about AI. 

James T. Kirk: I don’t see the difficulty. 

Lieutenant: That’s because you have graduated and you are the Captain. 

James T. Kirk: Explain.. Lieutenant, our heading takes us near the Ceti Alpha star system.. Not necessarily, Lieutenant. I’ve heard of the theoretical possibility of life based on silicon. A silicon-based life would be of an entirely different order. It’s possible that our phasers might not affect it. 

Lieutenant: How long will that journey take? 

James T. Kirk: Hopefully not too much longer. 

Lieutenant: You ave a sly sense of humor. 

James T. Kirk: I can’t quite place him, but. What about Miss Hedford? 

Lieutenant: I should have typed “You have a sly sense of humor.” 

James T. Kirk: Perhaps you were. Both Nancy and Crater went out of their way to mention one item they needed. 

Lieutenant: Who are Nancy and Crater? 

James T. Kirk: Too much recursion in AIML.

Perhaps some form of mediation can be helpful in your difficulties. The Federation Bureau of Industrialisation may be of aid to you.

 

For more of this kind of thing, go here:

http://www.a-i.com 

 

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Very highly recommended, especially for the graphics, and purchasable in pdf format

http://waitbutwhy.com/2015/01/artificial-intelligence-revolution-1.html 

http://waitbutwhy.com/2015/01/artificial-intelligence-revolution-2.html 

 

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The modern definition of artificial intelligence (or AI) is “the study and design of intelligent agents” where an intelligent agent is a system that perceives its environment and takes actions which maximizes its chances of success.[1] John McCarthy, who coined the term in 1956,[2] defines it as “the science and engineering of making intelligent machines.”[3] Other names for the field have been proposed, such as computational intelligence,[4] synthetic intelligence[4][5] or computational rationality.[6] The term artificial intelligence is also used to describe a property of machines or programs: the intelligence that the system demonstrates.

AI research uses tools and insights from many fields, including computer science, psychology, philosophy, neuroscience, cognitive science, linguistics, operations research, economics, control theory, probability, optimization and logic.[7] AI research also overlaps with tasks such as robotics, control systems, scheduling, data mining, logistics, speech recognition, facial recognition and many others.[8]

Much much more here: 

http://psychology.wikia.com/wiki/Artificial_intelligence 

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“We are in the midst of a revolution in machine intelligence, the art and engineering practices that let computers perform tasks that, until recently, could be done only by people…. For the record, most experts believe that strong machine intelligence will arrive before the century is over, assuming current trends continue.

Superintelligence: Paths, Dangers, Strategies deals with the aftermath of that event. The book’s author, Nick Bostrom, a professor of philosophy at the University of Oxford, has a background in theoretical physics and neuroscience. His scholarly work is focused on understanding and mitigating emerging risks that threaten the very survival of the human species: full-blown nuclear warfare, massive climate change, synthetic biology, nanotechnology or runaway machine intelligence.

Superintelligence deals with the last. I warmly recommend the opening and the closing chapters for their enticing arguments, soaring metaphors and insightful fables. You will come away unsettled, if not downright frightened…..

To constrain what could happen and ensure that humanity retains some modicum of control, we need to better understand the only known form of intelligence. That is, we need to develop a science of intelligence by studying people and their brains to try to deduce what might be the ultimate capabilities and goals of a machine intelligence. What makes a person smart, able to deal with a complex world that is in constant flux? How does intelligence develop throughout infancy, childhood and adolescence? How did intelligence evolve?

How much does intelligence depend on being embedded in social groups? What is the relation between intelligence and emotion and between intelligence and motivation? And what about consciousness? Will it make a difference to the AI’s action if it feels something, anything, and if it, too, can experience the sights and sounds of the universe?

In a field largely defined by science-fiction novels and movies acting as laboratories for exploring the possible, Bostrom’s Superintelligence is a philosopher’s Cassandra call to action (adorned with more than 40 pages of endnotes). Woe to us if we don’t eventually tackle the questions that the book throws out. Doing so effectively will be possible only once we have a principled, scientific account of the internal constraints and the architecture of biological intelligence. Only then will we be in a better position to put effective control structures in place to maximize the vast benefits that may come about if we develop smart companions to help solve the myriad problems humankind faces.”

 

[##]

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/0/0d/Superintelligence-Paths_Dangers_Strategies.jpg/220px-Superintelligence-Paths_Dangers_Strategies.jpg 

A philosopher worries about computers’ ever accelerating abilities to outpace human skills

By Christof Koch on September 1, 2015
“We are in the midst of a revolution in machine intelligence, the art and engineering practices that let computers perform tasks that, until recently, could be done only by people…. For the record, most experts believe that strong machine intelligence will arrive before the century is over, assuming current trends continue.

Superintelligence: Paths, Dangers, Strategies deals with the aftermath of that event. The book’s author, Nick Bostrom, a professor of philosophy at the University of Oxford, has a background in theoretical physics and neuroscience. His scholarly work is focused on understanding and mitigating emerging risks that threaten the very survival of the human species: full-blown nuclear warfare, massive climate change, synthetic biology, nanotechnology or runaway machine intelligence.

Superintelligence deals with the last. I warmly recommend the opening and the closing chapters for their enticing arguments, soaring metaphors and insightful fables. You will come away unsettled, if not downright frightened…..

To constrain what could happen and ensure that humanity retains some modicum of control, we need to better understand the only known form of intelligence. That is, we need to develop a science of intelligence by studying people and their brains to try to deduce what might be the ultimate capabilities and goals of a machine intelligence. What makes a person smart, able to deal with a complex world that is in constant flux? How does intelligence develop throughout infancy, childhood and adolescence? How did intelligence evolve?

How much does intelligence depend on being embedded in social groups? What is the relation between intelligence and emotion and between intelligence and motivation? And what about consciousness? Will it make a difference to the AI’s action if it feels something, anything, and if it, too, can experience the sights and sounds of the universe?

In a field largely defined by science-fiction novels and movies acting as laboratories for exploring the possible, Bostrom’s Superintelligence is a philosopher’s Cassandra call to action (adorned with more than 40 pages of endnotes). Woe to us if we don’t eventually tackle the questions that the book throws out. Doing so effectively will be possible only once we have a principled, scientific account of the internal constraints and the architecture of biological intelligence. Only then will we be in a better position to put effective control structures in place to maximize the vast benefits that may come about if we develop smart companions to help solve the myriad problems humankind faces.”

 

Christof Koch is president and chief scientific officer at the Allen Institute for Brain Science in Seattle. He serves on Scientific American Mind’s board of advisers.

https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/will-artificial-intelligence-surpass-our-own/ 

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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Superintelligence:_Paths,_Dangers,_Strategies 

[##]

“… This profoundly ambitious and original book breaks down a vast track of difficult intellectual terrain. After an utterly engrossing journey that takes us to the frontiers of thinking about the human condition and the future of intelligent life, we find in Nick Bostrom’s work nothing less than a reconceptualization of the essential task of our time.”

amazon.com

http://www.kurzweilai.net/superintelligence-paths-dangers-strategies 

[##]

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P0Nf3TcMiHo 

 [Nick Bostrom’s TED Talk on “a future full of human enhancement, nanotechnology and cloning long before they became mainstream concerns. Bostrom approaches both the inevitable and the speculative using the tools of philosophy, bioethics and probability.” ]

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fOhb7wkyMVo [107] [Nick Bostrom on Superintelligence]

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How artificial intelligence is changing economic theory

July 17, 2015 by Leah Burrows

http://phys.org/news/2015-07-artificial-intelligence-economic-theory.html 

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The Three Breakthroughs that Have Unleased AI

https://www.wired.com/2014/10/future-of-artificial-intelligence/ 

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“Artificial Intelligence (AI) is a science and a set of computational technologies that are inspired by—but typically operate quite differently from—the ways people use their nervous systems and bodies to sense, learn, reason, and take action. While the rate of progress in AI has been patchy and unpredictable, there have been significant advances since the field’s inception sixty years ago. Once a mostly academic area of study, twenty-first century AI enables a constellation of mainstream technologies that are having a substantial impact on everyday lives…..”

ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE AND LIFE IN 2030

ONE HUNDRED YEAR STUDY ON ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE |

REPORT OF THE 2015 STUDY PANEL | SEPTEMBER 2016

The Stanford 100 Year Study on Artificial Intelligence (AI100)

https://ai100.stanford.edu/2016-report 

https://ai100.stanford.edu/sites/default/files/ai100report10032016fnl_singles.pdf 

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“The human brain has many interesting properties. Raj Reddy speculated that there are about one hundred billion neural cells in the human brain and the brain might be performing 200 trillion operations per second if not faster than that [12]. In problem domains such as vision, speech and motor processes, “it is more powerful than 1,000 supercomputers; however, for simple tasks such as multiplication, it is less powerful than a four bit microprocessor” [12]. These processing events taking place in the brain require little conscious effort and awareness on the part of humans and they are extremely difficult for machines to emulate. Conversely, machines can excel in some processes that are difficult if not impossible to a human being. Reddy went on to argue that silicon-based intelligence, if it’s ever achieved, might just have different attributes after all.”

[12]. Foundations and Grand Challenges of Artificial Intelligence. Reddy, R. Winter, 1988, AI Magazine, p. 9.  

The History of Artificial Intelligence, p. 15

full pdf here:

 http://courses.cs.washington.edu/courses/csep590/06au/projects/history-ai.pdf

 

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Preparing for the Future of Artificial Intelligence

Executive Office of the President

National Science and Technology Council

Committee on Technology

October 2016

58-page pdf: preparing_for_the_future_of_ai 

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A tutorial on AI and video games

http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/research/project/video-games-and-artificial-intelligence/ 

[&&]{**}[##]

http://www.mbchapel.org/site/images/video_library.jpg 

President Barack Obama on How Artificial Intelligence Will Affect Jobs | WIRED

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DgL32wtgeXQ

[10 minutes]

See also 

The White House today release a report on the future of artificial intelligence. The document covered a number of concerns. Perhaps the shortest major section was “AI, Automation, and the Economy.”

http://www.forbes.com/forbes/ 

https://www.whitehouse.gov/sites/default/files/whitehouse_files/microsites/ostp/NSTC/preparing_for_the_future_of_ai.pdf 

 

[##]

Other Videos

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9TRv0cXUVQw

An 8-minute video primer on AI

[##]

Artificial Intelligence and the Future

Deep Mind’s Demis Hassabis at the Royal Society of the Arts

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cEL4iR-d4L8

[48 minutes]

[##]

Artificial Intelligence and Robotics

2016

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1wxwSdQpjHk 

[50 minutes]

[##]

Blurring the Lines Between Humans and Machines

Speakers

Pascale Fung, Professor, Department of Electronic and Computer Engineering, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology

Ben Goertzel, Chief Scientist, Hanson Robotics; Chief Scientist, Aidyia Ltd.

Hsiao-Wuen Hon, Corporate Vice President, Microsoft Corp.; Chairman, Asia-Pacific R&D Group, Microsoft

Filmed Sept 2016

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ko5rvfiK5vM

[60 minutes]

[##]

OpenAI – Deep Learning for Computer Vision

Andrej Karpathy

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_njYDK9Frpg 

[85 minutes]

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THE ASSOCIATION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE

http://www.aaai.org/home.html 

A major source for symposia, conferences and a magazine

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Journals and Books

[&&]{**}[##]

See the bibliography here

http://www.encyclopedia.com/science-and-technology/computers-and-electrical-engineering/computers-and-computing/artificial 

{**}

Artificial Intelligence, which commenced publication in 1970, is now the generally accepted premier international forum for the publication of results of current research in this field.

http://www.journals.elsevier.com/artificial-intelligence/

{**}

Artificial Intelligence: A Modern Approach

(Third edition) by Stuart Russell and Peter Norvig

The leading textbook in Artificial Intelligence.

Used in over 1300 universities in over 110 countries.

The 22nd most cited computer science publication on Citeseer (and 4th most cited publication of this century).

http://aima.cs.berkeley.edu 

{**}

Ai4u: Mind-1.1 Programmer s Manual (Paperback)

Arthur T Murray

Published by iUniverse, United States (2002)

ISBN 10: 0595259227 ISBN 13: 9780595259229

New Paperback

Item Description: iUniverse, United States, 2002. Paperback. Book Condition: New. 215 x 172 mm. Language: English . Brand New Book ***** Print on Demand *****. AI4U: Mind-1.1 Programer s Manual has the following positive and negative points. + It describes the rapidly evolving AI Minds on the Web. – It quickly becomes obsolete as the AI hyper-evolves. + On-demand publishing (ODP) makes for quick updates. – The Mentifex project is considered oddball on the Net. + You ve got the first book about the first real AI Mind. – There are other, better, more authoritative AI textbooks. + AI4U makes a good supplement for actually coding AI. – Artificial intelligence is too hard to understand. + AI4U describes the AI while it is still easy to learn. – I would rather build robots than study AI programming. + If you want to build a smart robot, then AI4U is for you. – I m only a high school student/teacher; what s the use? + This book will challenge even the most gifted student. – I am not a programmer and so I can t code AI. + AI4U teaches you how to operate an AI, not just code it. – I just want to do Web design, not artificial intelligence. + AI4U provides an AI that you may install on your website. – I am more interested in neuroscience and/or psychology. + AI4U teaches a theory of how the brain works psychologically. Bookseller Inventory # AAV9780595259229

http://www.abebooks.com/book-search/author/arthur-t-murray/ 

See also:

https://bytes.com/topic/c/answers/62154-c-ai-blog 

http://www.nothingisreal.com/mentifex_faq.html 

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https://www.udacity.com/course/intro-to-artificial-intelligence–cs271 

[four-month self-paced nanodegree]

http://si.wsj.net/public/resources/images/BI-AA979_AI_G_20150506144558.jpg 

source of image:

http://blogs.wsj.com/digits/2015/12/03/artificial-intelligence-ethics-a-new-focus-at-cambridge-university/ 

http://grad-schools.usnews.rankingsandreviews.com/best-graduate-schools/top-science-schools/artificial-intelligence-rankings  

MIT’s Computer Science & Artificial Intelligence Laboratory

https://www.csail.mit.edu 

https://ocw.mit.edu/courses/electrical-engineering-and-computer-science/6-034-artificial-intelligence-fall-2010/lecture-videos/ [open courseware at MIT]

https://www.edx.org/course/artificial-intelligence-uc-berkeleyx-cs188-1x [free course at Berkeley]

https://ocw.mit.edu/courses/electrical-engineering-and-computer-science/6-825-techniques-in-artificial-intelligence-sma-5504-fall-2002/lecture-notes/Lecture1Final.pdf 

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click on large image

http://www.legaltechnology.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/Artificial-Intelligence-AI-larger-graphic.png 

Artificial Intelligence in Law – The State of Play in 2015?

Added on the 3rd Nov 2015 at 12:17 pm

by Michael Mills, the co-founder and chief strategy officer of Neota Logic Inc., developers of a no-code software platform with which non-programmers can build expert systems to automate advice, documents, and processes.

http://www.legaltechnology.com/latest-news/artificial-intelligence-in-law-the-state-of-play-in-2015/ 

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On the validity of the Turing Test

http://www.psych.utoronto.ca/users/reingold/courses/ai/turing.html 

[&&]{**}[##]

Artificial intelligence, machine learning and advanced algorithms are at the heart of an emerging digital world.

That was one of the chiefs components of Gartner’s Peter Sondergaard, senior vice president and global head of Research opening remarks at today’s Gartner Symposium/ITxpo show in Orlando.

“Machine learning and artificial intelligence move at the speed of data, not at the speed of code releases. Information is the new code base.”

CIOs will participate in the building of a new digital platform with intelligence at the center,” Sondergaard said told a crowd of more than 8,000 CIOs and IT leaders. “The new competitive differentiator is understanding the customer’s intent through advanced algorithms and artificial intelligence. Creating new experiences that solve problems customers didn’t realize they had.”

Gartner says “advanced machine learning algorithms are composed of many technologies (such as deep learning, neural networks and natural-language processing), used in unsupervised and supervised learning, that operate guided by lessons from existing information.”

Advanced machine learning not only enables a smart machine to understand concepts in the environment, but enables it to learn. Through machine learning, a smart machine can change its future behavior. For example, by analyzing vast databases of medical case histories, “learning” machines can reveal previously unknown insights in treatment effectiveness. This area is evolving quickly, and organizations must assess how they can apply these technologies to gain competitive advantage, Gartner said last Fall in presenting trends for 2016.

Gartner says artificial intelligence “is technology that appears to emulate human performance typically by learning, coming to its own conclusions, appearing to understand complex content, engaging in natural dialogs with people, enhancing human cognitive performance (also known as cognitive computing) or replacing people on execution of nonroutine tasks. Applications include autonomous vehicles, automatic speech recognition and generation and detecting novel concepts and abstractions (useful for detecting potential new risks and aiding humans quickly understand very large bodies of ever changing information).”

“We are building machines that learn from experience and produce outcomes their designers did not explicitly envision. Systems that can experience and adapt to the world via the data they collect,” Sondergaard said. “Machine learning and artificial intelligence move at the speed of data, not at the speed of code releases. Information is the new code base.”

http://www.networkworld.com/article/3132006/data-center/gartner-artificial-intelligence-algorithms-and-smart-software-at-the-heart-of-big-network-changes.html 

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How smart is today’s artificial intelligence?

multi-media (video, audio and text) from PBS

http://www.pbs.org/newshour/bb/smart-todays-artificial-intelligence/ 

[with 54 comments]

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“… In response to AIs rapid developments, more than 8,000 leading researchers and scientists — including Elon Musk and Stephen Hawking — have signed an open letter alluding to AI’s potential pitfalls and possible detriment to humanity. Their main concern is that an existential risk faces humanity: an AI in control of autonomous weapons.

The letter goes on to state that autonomous weapons are quickly becoming the third revolution in warfare, after gunpowder and nuclear arms, and that AI researchers must focus their research on what is beneficial for humanity, and not just what is profitable. However, much of what is researched with AI may not be public knowledge, and is likely internal research that’s closely held by just a few very wealthy corporations. How can the public make informed decisions about something that is kept secret?….”

https://techcrunch.com/2016/10/23/advancements-in-artificial-intelligence-should-be-kept-in-the-public-eye/ 

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Artificial intelligence researchers have developed software that is capable of making complex decisions to accurately predict the outcome of human rights trials.

The AI “judge” was developed by computer scientists at University College London (UCL), the University of Sheffield and the University of Pennsylvania using an algorithm that analyzed the text of cases at the European Court of Human Rights.

Judicial decisions from the court were predicted with 79 percent accuracy by the machine learning algorithm.

“Previous studies have predicted outcomes based on the nature of the crime, or the policy position of each judge, so this is the first time judgments have been predicted using analysis of text prepared by the court,” said Vasileios Lampos, co-author of the research.

More: http://www.newsweek.com/ethical-artificial-intelligence-judge-predicts-human-rights-trials-513012 

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Artificial intelligence-powered malware is coming, and it’s going to be terrifying

http://www.businessinsider.com/darktrace-dave-palmer-artificial-intelligence-powered-malware-hacks-interview-2016-10 

The future is on its way, and there’s nothing you can do about it.

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How to Hold Algorithms Accountable

“… algorithms fed by big data can also amplify structural discrimination, produce errors that deny services to individuals, or even seduce an electorate into a false sense of security. Indeed, there is growing awareness that the public should be wary of the societal risks posed by over-reliance on these systems and work to hold themaccountable…..”

Algorithmic systems have a way of making mistakes or leading to undesired consequences. Here are five principles to help technologists deal with that.

November 17, 2016

https://www.technologyreview.com/s/602933/how-to-hold-algorithms-accountable/MIT 

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The Future (Probably) Isn’t as Scary as You Think 

Internet pioneer Kevin Kelly tries to predict the future by identifying what’s truly inevitable. How worried should we be? Yes, robots will probably take your job — but the future will still be pretty great.

 http://freakonomics.com/podcast/future-probably-isnt-scary-think/

jazz brain

jazz brain

Your Brain on Improvisation  (a 20-min. TED talk by a physician/surgeon and muscian)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U4k5JFmahVY  

 

Click on this link for large image:

http://66.media.tumblr.com/52bd5cc9da4c13c70503c13d840dc7da/tumblr_ml5b4ohAgz1rd1n1oo1_r1_1280.png 

 

http://science-junkie.tumblr.com/post/47797444631/why-your-brain-loves-that-new-song-when-jazz 

 

Giant Steps

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fxTdBg1MoQQ

 

 

Bobby Watson – Being a Student and Being a Teacher

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BZcWLa5_NNU

IRockJazz caught Bobby Watson on his recent visit to Chicago, and he discussed how he came to be a Jazz musician, how he picked the alto sax, and his view of Jazz education now. Don’t miss the quote Bobby recalls from Art Blakey when he visited University of Miami as a guest lecturer and addressed the students “You come here to get your diploma, you come with me to get your education”

Interested seeing more great interviews? Visit www.irockjazz.com

http://api.hub.jhu.edu/factory/sites/default/files/styles/hub_thumbnail/public/music_mind.jpg?itok=CcSrgjAr

Ever hear of “trading fours?”

It’s that back-and-forth trade jazz musicians do when they’re engaged in a musical “conversation.” One musician will play four bars of music, and the other will respond with four bars of her own. This improvised call and response is one of the things that makes jazz music so … jazzy. (Here’s an example of trading. Notice how the bass and piano cut out at regular intervals.)

Scientists at Johns Hopkins wondered whether studying the brains of musicians actively engaged in trading fours might shed light on the relationship between music and language. Under the direction of Charles Limb, an associate professor in the Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery at the School of Medicine, researchers placed musicians inside an MRI machine, gave them a special (see: non-magnetic) keyboard, and told them to have at it.

Here’s what researchers discovered: The brains of jazz musicians engrossed in spontaneous, improvisational musical conversation showed activation of brain areas traditionally associated with spoken language and syntax, areas that are used to interpret the structure of phrases and sentences. But the musical conversation shut down brain areas linked to semantics—those that process the meaning of spoken language.….”

More:

http://hub.jhu.edu/2014/02/19/your-brain-on-jazz/ 

 

 

Creative Brains: Music Art and Emotion

University of California Television (UCTV)  [71 minutes]

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C6txK8LXg1o

 

http://img.medscapestatic.com/pi/features/slideshow-slide/brain-disorders-art/fig1.jpg?resize=645:439

 

Secrets of the Creative Brain 

The Aspen Institute (58 minutes)

Nancy Andreasen is a leading neuroscientist and psychiatrist at the University of Iowa whose fascinating research into the creative mind has been informed in part by the stream of remarkable writers who gather there. She is now conducting a study that uses neuroimaging to visualize the creative brain in action, examining both artists and scientists. Her work also examines the roles of nature v. nurture and the relationship between creativity and mental illness.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=unAbERa0otY 

 

https://www.allaboutjazz.com/photos/2010/brainmusic800x480.jpg

Creativity, Genius and the Brain

Dana Foundation (93 minutes)

Presenters:

Nancy Andreasen, M.D., Ph.D.

Andrew H. Woods Chair of Psychiatry, University of Iowa College of Medicine

John Kounios, Ph.D.

Professor of Psychology, Drexel University

Roberta B. Ness, M.D., M.P.H.

Rockwell Professor of Public Health, Vice President for Innovation

The University of Texas School of Public Health

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pFPBxjp1iM0 

 

https://neuroaestheticsnet.files.wordpress.com/2015/03/oup-cover.jpg?w=711&h=1025

The Neuroscience of Creativity, Flow, and Openness to Experience – Scott Barry Kaufman, Ph.D.

BTC Institute  (64 minutes)

BioPharmaceutical Technology Center Institute

Part of the 12th Annual International Bioethics Forum, “Further Studies in Human Consciousness: Creative Insight”, held by the BTC Institute in Madison, WI on May 25-26, 2013.

For detailed information about the forum and more videos, please visit http://www.btci.org/bioethics

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Un_LroX0DAA 

http://cdn.creativityatwork.com/wp-content/uploads/whole-brain-intelligence600px.jpg

Creative Brains (Scott Kaufman)(20 minutes)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zpWLZntADdI 

 

http://www.azquotes.com/picture-quotes/quote-there-is-no-one-part-of-the-brain-which-recognizes-or-responds-emotionally-to-music-oliver-sacks-128-31-09.jpg

David Lynch: Consciousness, Creativity and the Brain (two hours)

David Lynch, the critically-acclaimed director behind such films as Blue Velvet and Mulholland Drive, spoke at the University of Oregon on Tuesday, November 8th, 2005. The Lecture is entitled “Consciousness, Creativity and the Brain.” Lynch was accompanied by Drs. John Hagelin, Ph.D., and Fred Travis, Ph.D.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vtgtkuKs8HQ 

 

http://izquotes.com/quotes-pictures/quote-in-jazz-you-listen-to-what-the-bass-player-is-doing-and-what-the-drummer-is-doing-what-the-david-amram-4537.jpg

 

The Primacy of Consciousness – Peter Russell – Full Version (70 minutes)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-d4ugppcRUE 

human interaction

human interaction

In the age of the internet and smartphones, there is no denying that technology continuously shapes our everyday lives….

featured graphic:

https://notalwaysright.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/02/1743544_857602394269215_1619534653_n.jpg 

music audio:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3WH9HET1j_o 

In the age of the internet and smartphones, there is no denying that technology continuously shapes our everyday lives. Ours is an ever-connected society, and social media in particular has transformed human interactions well beyond the confines of our immediate circles. We can now communicate with friends, family, and likeminded communities regardless of physical location, and sharing even the most intimate aspects of our private lives has become the norm.

Whilst global connectivity is no doubt extremely positive, a closer look at social media highlights a more destructive reality for the individual. In a world where everything is seemingly on show, it is crucial to question just how real social media is and to consider its impact on our mental well-being.

Social Media: What’s The Appeal?

To truly understand the relationship between social media and self-image, we need to recognize what draws us to online networks in the first place. Keeping in touch with far-flung friends and relatives may be an obvious advantage to sites like Facebook, but our fascination with social media runs deeper than that: it taps into our desire to be heard. Indeed, the internet has given us all a voice, with affordable packages such as this one making it easier than ever before to create a website or blog using common WordPress themes. Practically anyone can become a published writer or photographer within the online sphere, and the abundance of user-generated media stands testament to our inherent need to share. Social media presents not only another platform through which to express ourselves, but by apparently focusing on the banalities of everyday life, it enables us to construct an identity over which we have total control.

Through status updates, location check-ins, and photo uploads, we appear to give our online friends all-access insight into our lives, but in reality, the majority of us are presenting an edited version. Whilst this is necessary for maintaining some degree of privacy, the danger arises when we become more fixated on portraying the perfect existence than actually living it. Posting only the most flattering selfies or fun-filled weekend snaps may seem completely harmless – and is indeed a natural reflex for many online socialites – but our obsession with airbrushing every aspect of our digital lives can actually have some rather alarming psychological implications.

The Actual Self Vs. The Online Self

The notion of keeping up appearances is not unique to social media; from job interviews to meeting new people for the first time, it’s only natural that we put our best selves forward.

According to Edward Tory Higgins’ self-discrepancy theory (1987), we all identify with three different types of self: the actual self – the person we perceive ourselves to actually be; the ought self based on who we believe we should be; and the ideal self shaped by hopes, wishes, and aspirations – the person we want to be. Higgins believed that the larger the perceived discrepancy between, say, the actual and the ideal self, the more prone the individual is to negative emotions, such as low self-esteem, anxiety, and even self-contempt.

Of course, it is not only our own profiles that affect our mental wellbeing. Several studies have identified a correlation between Facebook usage in general and dissatisfaction with one’s own life, with envy cited as the most common emotion induced by the site. Bombarded with constant reminders of other people’s “perfect” lives, it can indeed be incredibly difficult to see through the illusion that everyone else is flying higher, having more fun, and going to better places. Our failure to fully realize our own goals is once again highlighted, and we feel inadequate – and miserable – by comparison.

External Validation or True Self-Worth?

According to Statista, 73% of the US population had a social media profile in 2015, a figure that grows significantly year on year. The question remains, then: if social media makes us feel so bad, why do we continue to subscribe and take part? Fear of missing out no doubt plays a major role, as online networks have become so integral to the way we interact with our peers. Another key factor is our inherent need to be regarded positively by others, as explained by psychologist Carl Rogers’ theory of personality. There is no denying that posting a picture online and receiving likes and comments is one of the most instant – and measurable – forms of external validation, and gives us quite the buzz. In that respect, social media has made it all too easy to choose the path of instant, short-term gratification, with the ideal or online self often taking precedence over the actual self. Whilst social media provides a quick-fix, the ever widening gap between the actual and ideal selves can leave us feeling empty and unfulfilled in the long term.

Loving Yourself In The Age of Social Media

The good life is a process, not a state of being. It is a direction not a destination.

Carl Rogers, On Becoming a Person (1961)

A significant part of Rogers’ theory is the concept of self-actualization through reaching one’s full potential, ultimately aligning the actual self with the ideal self. Although this is an ongoing journey rather than a fixed destination, the more congruent we perceive the two selves to be, the greater our sense of fulfilment. However, in a world where social media paints a glossy picture of perfect lives, there is a growing tendency to abandon the pursuit of self-actualization and to live vicariously instead through the online self.

Someone who knows only too well just how toxic this can be is teenage model Essena O’Neill. Having previously made a living through her social media posts, she dramatically quit Instagram last year, exposing a deeply flawed reality behind the perfect scenes. No longer able to cope with the discrepancy between her real life and the life she was portraying online, she has shunned social media in order to focus on “real-life projects.” In an emotional video that clearly captures just how miserable it made her feel to be “defined by numbers,” O’Neill strongly urges others to follow suit.

Achieving and maintaining a positive self-image in the social media age is not necessarily about quitting Facebook, Instagram, or Twitter. Rather, it is about readjusting your perception of the online world and finding a balance between digital and real life. Firstly, learning to see through the smoke and mirrors of other social media profiles will break the habit of comparing yourself unfavorably, so that time spent online is more about connecting with friends than highlighting your own shortcomings.

Secondly, it’s crucial to focus wholly on aligning your actual self with your ideal self, rather than simply projecting these aspirations onto your online profile. Be 100% present in every moment – do things that actually fulfill and satisfy you, regardless of whether it makes an impressive social media post. Nurturing face-to-face connections and placing more value on your real-life state puts a much-needed perspective on social media, ultimately boosting the way we perceive ourselves and paving the way to genuine, long-term happiness.

http://www.collective-evolution.com/2016/03/10/self-worth-in-the-age-of-social-media/  

via

http://www.blacklistednews.com/The_Psychology_Of_Social_Media_or_How_Our_Online_Lives_Are_Harming_Real-Life_Happiness

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http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-4TcLyVL8l1w/Ufk2ig7caaI/AAAAAAAAAP4/G-0cGVel20Q/s1600/cartoon.jpg

Source:

http://tmgnorthwest.blogspot.com/2013/08/human-interaction-there-isnt-app-for.html 

 

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Consciousness wants to create new consciousness, and it can. Imagination is how it does it. If there were some ultimate state of consciousness, imagination would always be able to play another card and take it further.

In any arena of life, and especially when it comes to the mind, perception, power, empathy, and so on, there is always a status quo. It’s merely the place where a person says, “Well, that’s enough. I’ll settle for what I have. I’ll stop here.”

Sooner or later, this leads to boredom, frustration, problems, and conflict. It leads to a decline.

Imagination, which knows no bounds, is the source for the most adventurous explorations. It can have great impact on the material world, of course, but one mustn’t therefore conclude it is composed of matter or energy. Imagination is non-material. To think otherwise winds you up in using some version of physics to depict imagination—and then you are imposing limits on it. This is an error. Imagination doesn’t obey any laws of physics.

If imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, we’ve flattered reality enough. It doesn’t need any more. Imagination creates new realities.

You can create the same thing over and over, and eventually you’ll be about as alive as a table. Inject imagination into the mix, and everything suddenly changes. You can steer that boat anywhere you want to.

The lowest common denominator of consensus signals an absence of imagination: everyone agrees; everyone is bored; everyone is obedient. On the opposite end of the spectrum, there are massive floods of unique individual creation, and then that sought-after thing called abundance is as natural as the sun rising in the morning.

Sitting around in a cosmic bus station waiting for reality is what reality is. Everything else is imagination.

There are those who believe life is a museum. You walk through the rooms, find one painting, stroll into it and take up permanent residence. But the museum is endless. If you were a painter, you’d never decide to live inside one of your canvases forever. You’d keep on painting.

The relentless and obsessive search for all those things on which we can agree is a confession of bankruptcy.

When we re-learn to live through and by imagination, we enter and invent new space and time.

With imagination, one can solve a problem. More importantly, one can skip ahead of the problem and render it null and void.

Imagination isn’t a system. It might invent systems, but it is non-material. It’s a capacity. It feels no compulsion to imitate reality. It makes realities. Its scope is limited only by a person’s imagining of how far imagination can go.

The human race is obsessed by the question: what exists? It appears to be a far easier question than: what do you want to create? This comparison explains why civilizations decline.

Imagination is a path. Walking on that path long enough, you find answers to all the questions you’ve ever asked, as an incidental side effect of the journey. You also find power that most people only dream of.

https://jonrappoport.wordpress.com/2016/03/12/power-beyond-mind-control-2/ 

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http://www.azquotes.com/picture-quotes/quote-every-human-interaction-offers-you-the-chance-to-make-things-better-or-to-make-things-barbara-brown-taylor-64-12-13.jpg

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https://ksr-ugc.imgix.net/assets/004/442/536/426850fa013fea9d930634fa52e2356d_original.jpg?v=1441400319&w=680&fit=max&auto=format&q=92&s=1495993d86bd7b5cb6f41788e8106d2f 

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1164329758/the-wonderful-world-of-creatures-and-code/description 

[Ed.: This book arrived last week; I am pleased to have received it for free since I was one of the “kickstarters”. I gave it to my daughter, an elementary school teacher, and just ordered one of the last “leftovers” to read to my grandkids.]

sleep

If Death Is As Delicious As Sleep

 

If death is as delicious as sleep, it’ll be fun.

Restful, packed with dreams,

Resolving Old Turmoils, 

Remembering forgotten moments….

 

If death is as difficult as sleep, it’ll be 

Fat with Tossing and Turning, 

Ambivalence and Agony,

Processing those difficultes

Of Social and Spiritual Life.

 

If death is as domineering as sleep, it’ll be

Filled with Chances to Apologize to All the People 

who Met an Untimely Death at the Hands of Those 

Whose Evil Power I could Not Manage to Overcome but 

Who Laughed and Invited Me 

to their Bad Karma fundraiser 

(“We’re Stocking Up — Like Stacking Wood for the Long, Harsh Winter — so That in Some Future Lifetime They’ll Be Reduced to Charcoal”)

 

If death is as refreshing as sleep. it’ll be

Filled with Wish Lists and Wondrousness

About the Possibilities of Next time,

of What Might Be When Dawn Comes Again.

 

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http://consciousexplorers.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/2015-Conscious-Explorers-Logo-header.jpg 

Apparently I communicated during my hospitalization eight years ago with a number of people while I hovered near death.   

As the cardiothoracic surgeon in that TV show “Proof” says, 

“being dead is a kind of grey area.  

Something or someone notified my sponsoring doctor — the one who first made identified the problem via “Skype” —when she was out on the street and who drove immediately to the hospital — the one where she worked — even before they called her to come in  —when I flat-lined in the interventional cardiology lab.  

But maybe that was her act of remote viewing.

I “told” my wife — who was 800 miles away — from inside the OR during the second procedure— , they’d returned me to sew up the leaking artery they’d left during the first procedure —,  that I’d be alright. (I would be, just as soon as I rehabbed from the ischemic motor stroke caused by the dislodged arterial plaque.)

There were other people who claimed to have heard from me while I was in the post-surgical coma, one of them a virtual friend in California.  

It was the same fellow my “pants” called months later when I sat down in such a way so as to trigger the “contacts” page, scroll down to his listing near the bottom of the alphabet, and then navigate the menu three more simple steps. 

I didn’t know I’d called him until he responded to the blank message it had left on his answering machine.  When I checked my own phone for evidence of calls placed, there it was. 

“Hello?  Is there anybody out there?”

http://in5d.com/images/128_19_04_09_6_57_11.gif 

“…we are within an energy sea which owes its origin to a divine process. 

Is humanity a happenstance biosuit, a social animal walking on the surface of the planet without meaning, being pulled by a wide variety of conscious and unconscious demands of life? ….”

http://www.metanexus.net/essay/cosmology-consciousness-understanding-our-interconnectedness 

http://fractal.fractalenlighten.netdna-cdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/11/multi-dimensional-being-e1416410648127.jpg

 

 

Three hours of delta wave deep sleep binaural beats and isochronic tones by Brainwave Hub 

Summertime

In a move not unlike cleaning off my desk before a long holiday weekend, I’m going to lump a bunch of seemingly-disconnected mini-entries that are relevant to recent posts and past themes. They and their predecessors will still be here for your consumption over the long, hot summer.  May yours be safe, relaxing, healthy and productive.

 

You’ve probably become aware of the importance of the discipline of the harmony of spirit in my thinking and in my life.  Unable to “take it to the tatami”, I’ve at least been able to take it to heart and mind and learn more about it applies to everyday life. One of the better writers and practitioners in the field has two books, both of which fall into the bibliography for the e-book on how to use your mind. Thus it is with little surprise that I find her work presented by Jeff at his searchofpeace web site, and I’m going to post that link and let it serve as the first offering here:

http://www.searchofpeace.com/blog/2015/07/01/aikido-the-practice-of-freedom/#more-614 

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JnA8GUtXpXY 

The Extended Mind: Recent Experimental Evidence

A GoogleTech talk (1:37:42) by Rupert Sheldrake

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http://noetic.org 

http://noetic.org/sites/default/files/uploads/files/IONS-Roadmap2Future.pdf 

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http://www.thehealersjournal.com/dna-activation-sound-healing/

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In the early 1990s, IONS posited a question in the midst of remarkably rapid increases in autoimmune and cancer disease research. As the steward of decades of consciousness science research, it asked, “Are we not actually hardwired to heal?” In other words, while we’re placing the lens of science on the healing response, shouldn’t we also examine the overlooked possibility of a holistic, internal self-healing system? Until then, research had focused on eradicating disease, zeroing in on separate physiological functions such as the immune and endocrine systems. On the street, a continental divide separated conventional science from the public’s acceptance of a mind-body healing connection. No widely accessible forums, neither books, television, nor mainstream media, fostered such awareness.

At the same time, the emerging field of psychoneuroimmunology—the study of the connection between the mind/brain and immune system—was too new and undersupported to help bridge the divide. IONS sought to lay the groundwork for a future medical model based on the whole human experience – the interconnection of consciousness and the body comprising a single “ecosystem” of health and wellness.

The Studies

Throughout the previous decade, IONS had collaborated on and assembled dozens of studies on spontaneous remission, placebo affects, and multiple personalities, a collection that identified some of the most compelling evidence of a mind-body healing connection. Then-Vice President for Research Brendan O’Regan initiated an exhaustive review of literature in these three areas. The review identified frontier researchers from around the world, including, among others

• George Solomon – Correlations between stress, personality, emotions, and outlook on autoimmune disease progression

• Robert Ader – Breakdowns in the immune system response of rats subjected to profound stress

• Norman Cousins – The “will to live” as placebo-induced recovery and “laughter therapy,” both demonstrating emotions influence on healing.

• Margaret Kemeny – Seminal work on Type C – or cancer prone – personality

• Jamie Pennebaker – Correlation between journaling, a stress-reducing form of emotional expression, and immune system activity

• Candice Pert – The body’s ability to produce its own “mood-altering” drugs, called neuropeptides, in response to pain, stress.

Outcomes/Impacts

IONS’ “The Heart of Healing” study produced volumes of research data and anecdotes, which captured the collective imaginations of mass media and medical science at a time when autoimmune diseases and cancer dominated the international psyche. In October 1993 it became a six-hour Turner Broadcasting documentary, delivering the topic of mind-body healing to millions of living rooms. Cox News Service predicted it would be “the most taped, begged, borrowed and shared TV series of the year.” Along with an illustrated hardcover book, “The Heart of Healing” explored how culture informs our ideas about the nature of healing, presented leading-edge research on the mind-body relationship, and expanded views of human healing potential. At the same time, IONS research was also used in Healing and the Mind, Bill Moyers’ pivotal television series, while O’Regan’s work with Caryle Hirshberg and Marc Ian Barasch produced the milestone book, Remarkable Recovery. The New York Times called it “an alluring work of hopeful nonfiction.” Shortly thereafter, Andrew Weil went on to publish Spontaneous Healing: How to Discover and Enhance Your Body’s Natural Ability to Maintain and Heal Itself – categorized by Amazon.com as a mass-market book.

These works went on to inspire others, generating a measurable shift in public behaviors towards mind-body medicine. That field of research swelled, and the National Institutes of Health established the Office of Alternative Medicine. In1997 total visits to alternative medicine practitioners increased 47 percent from 1990, exceeding total visits to all U.S. primary care physicians. (JAMA) And by 2009, 38 percent of American adults (and 12 percent of children) were turning to meditation, hypnosis, group support, biofeedback, mental imaging, and simple positive thinking to maintain health and cure illness. (NIH)

Most remarkably, “The Heart of Healing” project assembled the fields of psychology, biology, immunology, psychiatry, and anthropology to identify a healing system that later emerged as the field of psychoneuroimmunology (PNI). While some were initially skeptical, the United States Public Health Service funded hundreds of research grants in the field of PNI. In 1985, Medline, the worlds’ largest medical database, cited no PNI listings but posted more than 100 between 1995 and 1997. New research is still being carried out, and there are several academic journals devoted to PNI.

Conclusion

Today we now know that there are many tools to help stimulate the healing response, and mind-body medicine research is keeping up the pace. For example, the department of defense is accelerating studies on alternative practices in wound healing. Integral practice programs are becoming more commonplace. Stress has become one of the fastest-growing areas of medical research. And survivorship programs that look beyond physical dynamics are sprouting up in major medical programs, including Sloan Kettering and Columbia. As these programs unfold, IONS continues to push the envelope in healing-systems research, looking for more tools and technologies that support human resilience.

http://noetic.org/about/case-studies/heart-healing 

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“Civilized” Medicine Dismisses Mind/Soul

For thousands of years, traditional, indigenous, and Eastern medical traditions integrated body, mind, and spirit as a whole healing system. When modern science emerged in the 17th century, it broke down the human experience into measurable components it could label, enshrining the physical body as a biological machine in what became the new model of “Western medicine.” Because the ethereal entity of the mind could only be considered, not recorded, it was associated with that inexplicable, intangible human essence called the soul. When Rene Descartes wanted to pursue his theories of a unitary mind/body system, Church officials limited him to the study of the physical world, instructing him to leave the soul to them. A few centuries after that, germ theory broke down the biological sciences even further, giving the immune system complete autonomy as a healing system.

For increasing numbers of healthcare consumers and professionals alike, the biomedical model has failed to offer a system for understanding the fullness of the lived experience. By the time the Institute of Noetic Sciences was founded in 1973, these frustrations had intensified the call for new research into a medical model that engaged the possibility of human transcendence in the face of illness and disease. The stage was thus set for “consciousness science” to come forward.

Consciousness Science Pushes for Mind-Body Evidence

The first attempts by modern medicine to reunite the mind and body in the laboratory occurred in the 1950s. In response to what a few scientists thought was a misunderstanding that the mind could manifest somatic (cell-based, biological) symptoms during psychological distress, the study of “psychosomatic medicine” was born (Alexander, 1950; Engel, 1977; Salk, 1962; Selye, 1976; Solomon & Moos, 1964; Wolf & Goddell, 1968).

The Institute of Noetic Sciences used this mind-body breakthrough as an invitation to introduce consciousness science into the field of medical research, and began studying the miraculous healings at Lourdes, France, and in Medjugorje, in the former Yugoslavia. It went on to collect evidence of “spontaneous” remission and regression of illnesses from as far back as 1846 – the first such recorded incident – until it had more than 3500 accounts from 830 medical journals in more than twenty languages.

By the 1980s, the study of psychosomatic medicine had revealed new sets of observations that cognitive processes, neurobiology, and the immune system were functionally integrated. IONS seized this “evidence-based” opportunity to push harder for scientific evidence; it initiated a program of research called the Inner Mechanisms of the Healing Response. Under the leadership of Brendan O’Regan, IONS’ then vice-president of research, this program identified formal research on the link between consciousness and health, which included the idea that consciousness-related factors (cognitive and emotional) might play a role in both wellness and the healing of disease. These endeavors helped give rise to a new formal medical discipline called psychoneuroimmunology (PNI) (Ader, 1981; Rogers, Dubey, & Reich, 1979, Sklar & Anisman, 1979; Solomon and Amkraut, 1981, Stein et al., 1976).

PNI is the study of the body’s innate healing abilities. It is based on the premise that multiple factors – including psychological, emotional, genetic, endocrine, nervous and immune – affect immune functioning and hence resistance to disease. In other words, medical science was beginning to find its way back to the origins of health and healing: the connection of mind and body.

IONS Ushers Psychoneuroimmunology into Post-Modern Era

Throughout the 1980s, studies continued to reveal evidence to support the PNI premise. IONS bolstered this momentum in 1985 when it sponsored the first international workshop on neuroimmunomodulation (Pardes), where a new generation of scientists met to explore how the brain and immune system communicate with each other. IONS provided additional grants to support four subsequent meetings, which later shaped the first PNI professional society (Rabin, Laudenslager): 1) investigation into the relationship between hypnosis and aspects of the immune response (Locke, Olness); 2) conditioning and the immune response (Ader); 3) the role of a cognitive intervention in the immune responses of colon cancer patients (Levy); and 4) immune system changes in both healer and healee during non-contact therapeutic touch.

By the 1990s, the struggle was beginning to pay off: PNI research had discovered the anatomical link between the central nervous system and the immune system, and provided evidence that immune reactions could be learned and that they influenced behavior. PNI research then began concentrating on biological signaling – neurotransmitters and hormones talking to immune cell receptors. Once PNI began to delve into the cellular and molecular mechanisms where scientists could measure receptors and “second messenger” effects, even stalwart skeptical immunologists began to accept it.

The work of IONS coincided with and even validated this benchmark of acceptance with a six-hour television series called “The Heart of Healing,” produced by Turner Broadcasting. It provided an international audience of healthcare consumers with new language and a new narrative to assimilate mind-body perspectives and approaches into their understanding of wellness.

PNI’s full break into the medical mainstream occurred in the late 90s when science repeatedly demonstrated the health implications of stress on the immune system and published its results in established medical journals – ending the decade when stress became a household word and almost anyone paying attention knew about its connection to illness.

IONS’ Pivotal Role in a New Field of Study

Despite early skepticism and funding shortages, IONS’ bold early work exploring the role of consciousness in healing helped the mainstream medical community accept PNI as an established and credible medical science. The Institute’s persistence led to scientific evidence of a mind-body connection and a return to the wisdom of the holistic human experience. While PNI has a long way to go to establish acceptance and widespread support among all branches of the medical community and among health care consumers, it has ushered in a post-modern era of scientific research. PNI research continues at many major medical institutions around the world, where medical practices based on PNI research – including meditation, hypnosis, and imagery – are being offered as standard treatment protocols.

http://noetic.org/about/case-studies/mind-body 

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m8rRzTtP7Tc 

How Meditation Can Reshape Our Brains

“It’s more like “body-mind plasticity” than “neuroplasticity” because it’s not just the brain. The body is a holistic system.

There are about 4 input channels: stomach e.g. for recycling RNA, small intestine e.g. for absorbing water-based nutrition, the colon e.g. for fermentation of solid waste by gut bacteria, and the lungs e.g. for the absorption of airborne nutrition. There are a couple of output channels: solid waste elimination, liquid waste elimination, skin (sweat), and the lungs.”

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Change Your Mind, Change Your Life

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=upNONoxskiw 

Bodhin Kjolhede weaves metaphor and allegory together to explain the importance of meditation. He will deliver several tangible benefits of meditation that would go unrealized without personal experience.

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How mindfulness meditation redefines pain, happiness & satisfaction

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JVwLjC5etEQ 

This talk was given at a local TEDx event, produced independently of the TED Conferences. Dr. Kasim Al-Mashat teaches and presents on the use of mindfulness for creating healing, transformation, and peace. He is passionate about enhancing people’s sense of joy, authenticity, and presence. Kasim also teaches and speaks about the use of laughter and laughter yoga for improving wellness.

Kasim is a therapist with interest in fostering positive change in mental health both inside and outside the therapy room. He recently returned from completing a challenging six-month meditation retreat in silence, in a forest monastery in South East Asia.

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LWQfe__fNbs 

Is There Scientific Proof We Can Heal Ourselves?

Lissa Rankin, MD explores the scientific literature, reviewing case studies of spontaneous remission, as well as placebo and nocebo effect data, to prove that our thoughts powerfully affect our physiology when we believe we can get well.

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Eric Barker, on “How To Learn a New Skill Quickly” 

via

http://dangerousintersection.org 

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http://www.bakadesuyo.com/2015/02/being-the-best-at-anything/ 

http://www.bakadesuyo.com 

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http://www.bakadesuyo.com/2014/02/most-successful-people/ 

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You’ve been able to see that you can find numerous similar and likely repetitive or overlapping videos.  Take that as far as you want to go; stop when you’ve had enough. Return later for review, or further exploration.

With this final exception:

Mental Toughness

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LCPgvTRftZg 

Dr. Sean Richardson takes lessons learned from the professional athlete’s locker room to provide an overview of the subtleties of human brain & behaviour function to facilitate overcoming the normal & predictable human barriers to success.

See his web site here: http://drseanr.com

If you’ve gotten to this point, then you are, like a passenger in my taxicab, at your destination. This is your stop. Explore this fellow’s web site, watch his introductory video, look into his blog, check out his coaching services (hey, a $49 online starter session to look at and shape your goal package is a great deal), and there is more.

Are there others like this guy?  Oh, to be sure.

There is an entire industry in “coaching”, along with books, text books, degree programs, certification, etc.  And there are a lot of charlatans. But check out this guy’s credentials. He’s been there and done it. He has a doctorate in the psychology of excellence. He’s delivered results at the professional level.

If you can find quickly someone better than this guy….

Je Ne Sais Quoi #4

Je Ne Sais Quoi Day Four

Michael Murphy

Michael Murphy is Co-founder and Chairman Emeritus of the Board of the Esalen Institute, and directs the Institute’s think tank operations through its Center for Theory & Research (CTR).

http://www.esalen.org/ctr/michael-murphy 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michael_Murphy_(author) 

Books by Murphy:

Golf in the Kingdom (fiction) (1971)

• Jacob Atabet (fiction) (Jeremy P. Tarcher/St. Martins Press, 1977)

• The Psychic Side of Sports (non-fiction, co-written with Rhea White) (1978)

• An End to Ordinary History: A Novel (fiction) (1982)

The Future of the Body: Explorations into the Further Evolution of Human Nature (1992)

The Life We Are Given: A Long-Term Program for Realizing the Potential of Body, Mind, Heart, and Soul (non-fiction, co-written with George Leonard) (1995)

In the Zone: Transcendent Experience in Sports (non-fiction, update to The Psychic Side of Sports, co-written with Rhea White) (1995)

• The Physical and Psychological Effects of Meditation: A Review of Contemporary Research With a Comprehensive Bibliography, 1931-1996 (non-fiction, 2nd edition) (1997)

• The Kingdom of Shivas Irons (fiction – sequel to Golf in the Kingdom) (1997)

God and the Evolving Universe: The Next Step in Personal Evolution (non-fiction,co-written with James Redfield and Sylvia Timbers) (2002)

• An End to Ordinary History: Comments on a Philosophical Novel (non-fiction) (2011)

In 1992 he published The Future of the Body, a massive historical and cross-cultural collection of documentation of various occurrences of extraordinary human functioning such as healing, hypnosis, martial arts, yogic techniques, telepathy, clairvoyance, and feats of superhuman strength. Rather than presenting such documentation as scientific proof, he presents it as a body of evidence to motivate further investigation.

He is also an avid golfer and has written two fictional books relating golf and human potential. His 1971 novel, Golf in the Kingdom has been in constant publication since its release and has become one of the best selling golf books of all time. It is considered by many to be a classic of sports literature. In 1992 it spawned The Shivas Irons Society, a 501(c)3 organization to explore the transformational potential of sport, of which Michael is the co-chairman of the advisory board. He partnered with film producer Mindy Affrime on the feature film adaptation of Golf In The Kingdom. It was directed by Susan Streitfeld and stars David O’Hara, Mason Gamble, Malcolm McDowell and Frances Fisher.

“Yes, worlds within worlds right in front o’ our nose. Think about the times ye really concentrated upon a thing, did ye see it change in front o’ your very eyes? Now, did it not? The lovely face tha’ grew lovelier still, the new music in the old tunes, the new meanin’s in a familiar poem, the new energies in the old swing? Yes, worlds within worlds here, with new shapes, new powers.”– Shivas Irons, “Golf in the Kingdom”

http://golfinthekingdommovie.com

“Golf is a game to teach you about the messages from within, about the subtle voices of the body-mind. And once you understand them you can more clearly see your ‘hamartia,’ the ways in which your approach to the game reflects your entire life. Nowhere does a man go so naked.”

Michael Murphy (author of “Golf in the Kingdom”)

[Hamartia is the protagonist’s error or flaw that leads to a chain of plot actions culminating in a reversal from their good fortune to bad. What qualifies as the error or flaw can include an error resulting from ignorance, an error of judgement, a flaw in character, or sin.]

 

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It is possible now to gather verified data about our greater capacities from medical research, anthropology, psychology, sociology, psychic research, religious studies, sports, the arts, and other fields.

See “The Future of the Body

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God and the Evolving Universe is a book that deepens our knowledge of personal growth and shows how each of us can begin to integrate our extraordinary experiences into a heightened synchronistic flow – allowing us to participate consciously in an unfolding evolutionary adventure.

http://www.randomhouse.co.uk/editions/9780553814811 

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PDF: Murphy Excerpts 

 

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The Center for Theory and Research contains, among other things, the online database compiled by Murphy on the topics of extraordinary human functioning, the bibliography for his research into meditation, books on near-death experience and related topics, and other scholarly resources.

http://www.esalen.org/ctr/display/bio.cfm?ID=9 

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Irreducible Mind

Toward a Psychology for the 21st Century

by Edward F. Kelly, PhD and Emily Williams Kelly

Current mainstream opinion in psychology, neuroscience, and philosophy of mind holds that all aspects of human mind and consciousness are generated by physical processes occurring in brains. Views of this sort have dominated recent scholarly publication. The present volume, however, demonstrates—empirically—that this reductive materialism is not only incomplete but false. The authors systematically marshal evidence for a variety of psychological phenomena that are extremely difficult, and in some cases clearly impossible, to account for in conventional physicalist terms. Topics addressed include phenomena of extreme psychophysical influence, memory, psychological automatisms and secondary personality, near-death experiences and allied phenomena, genius-level creativity, and ‘mystical’ states of consciousness both spontaneous and drug-induced. The authors further show that these rogue phenomena are more readily accommodated by an alternative ‘transmission’ or ‘filter’ theory of mind/brain relations advanced over a century ago by a largely forgotten genius, F. W. H. Myers, and developed further by his friend and colleague William James. This theory, moreover, ratifies the commonsense conception of human beings as causally effective conscious agents, and is fully compatible with leading-edge physics and neuroscience. The book should command the attention of all open-minded persons concerned with the still-unsolved mysteries of the mind.

http://www.noetic.org/library/publication-books/irreducible-mind/ 

Musical Interlude for Notes:

Somewhere/Everywhere, Keith Jarrett Trio

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cYSOeEsi87k (19:40)

 

Speaking of golf, tomorrow we here from the fellow who initiated the legend of Bagger Vance and has written extensively about finding the way to break through writer’s block or any of the myriad of things that you allow to get in your way and detour your eventual success.