Tag Archives: future jobs

sit stay

sit stay

“… The Essential Phone ships September 1, starting at $699. You can buy it subsidized from Sprint, or unlocked from Amazon and elsewhere. (You should buy it unlocked.) It is the first in a line of products that Essential believes will bring innovation back to the smartphone market and give people a brand to love in the same way millions love Apple.

In some ways, the Essential Phone appears genuinely exciting and new. In most, it just feels like a really good smartphone. And in a few frustrating ways, it’s not yet good enough…..”

https://www.wired.com/2017/08/review-essential-phone/ 

[But will it sync with my MAC OS?]

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“… Technology is going faster and faster and ethical and moral debates aren’t occurring at the same rhythm. We need to be ready for a speed of innovation that we can’t control. I’m concerned, and you should be too. Should we, as a social being, force ourselves to slow down? Is that even possible?….

Brilliant and Exciting but Scary Technologies

BEST, for short (I’ve always wanted to invent an acronym). What could be so brilliant and exciting that also makes it pretty freaking scary? There are several technologies that many people can’t stop speaking about saying they are “the next big thing”:

AI

Virtual Reality

Bio Revolution

Brain Computer Interface

Conquering Space

They do sound pretty cool, but in case you’re not convinced, let me tell you what’s going on with each one of them and where they’re heading…..”

https://blog.albertoelias.me/is-technology-outpacing-human-development-we-need-to-talk-12a4f98b2a50 

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wXU93BnLhbw

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http://www.techrepublic.com/resource-library/whitepapers/how-to-build-a-successful-career-in-cybersecurity-free-pdf/ 

http://www.zdnet.com/article/ai-will-create-800000-jobs-and-1-1-trillion-revenue-by-2021-salesforce/ 

http://www.zdnet.com/article/the-future-of-jobs-automation-technologies-robotics-and-artificial-intelligence/ 

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Last week, the household experienced a traumatic event, albeit a natural one.  A blue heron found our koi pond.  The greater regional area is dappled with small ponds, streams, swampland and, naturally, it all becomes a habitat for them.  

The local koi supply and pond industry says such events cannot be avoided, only minimized; they suggest the use of decoys, and nets.  

We didn’t have the net in place, but one friend had given us a decoy statuette of a pelican. 

After the blue heron was spotted for the first time, my wife ran out and bought an expensive heron decoy.  The blue heron returned, flew in to stand next to the decoy, and tapped it with its beak. 

“Yes, I thought you were rather immobile; these people must think I’m stupid.”

People and dogs shooed the heron away but the game was on; it circled the neighborhood and sampled from several koi ponds in the area.  The surving koi hid under the rocks in deep water and did not come out for days; even now they are reticent, but they do get hungry once a week. 

The neighbor with the other koi pond brought out his BB rifle (useless), his pellet pistol (somewhat effective at letting the bird know there was a predator nearby), and his paintball gun. 

When last seen, the heron had matching bright orange spots on his wings.

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Book report:

46 Books have been completely re-annotated 

26 Books have not been annotated

3 Books need to be read and annotated

6 Books have not been read and may not be of value

The timeline has yet to be developed, and it needs to be integrated with that of my life. 

The remaining 26 books will be easily and quickly annotated, and then the real deep fun begins: building the timeline, developing the order and outline, and writing. 

And then editing. 

And re-editing. 

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For the past several weeks, the household has been engaged in nurturing a new furry “son”; a young neutered male of six months was rescued from a local shelter who had received it from a designer hybrid puppy mill in a state that does not require neutering.  

He’s a Labrador retriever/American foxhound who will be a big boy and with whom we are deeply-engaged in obedience school. 

We named him Remy, after the Red Sox broadcaster (RemDawg) currently on medical leave for his fifth battle with lung cancer.  It’s essentially my wife’s dog, and my wife is a huge Red Sox fan and won two bouts with cancer herself. 

MLB is currently tinkering with the game of baseball to make it more attractive, a disastrous interference in my opinion, and perhaps Jerry’s; he’s has already been verbally spanked for his comment about banning translators from mound visits; he’s the author of an outstanding book on how to watch the game. 

We’ve been watching the game on TV and live (both of our kids were stars on the diamond) for decades.

Now we are learning to translate dog barks. And the four-legged RemDawg is now showing his hound sounds too. He chews through his harnesses and leashs, our bone and biscuit budget is waaay up, and he has an annoying habit of nipping at the hands and legs of Mrs. Blogger. The “coins in the can” trick and running the vaccum cleaner stops the incessant barking.  We’re learning too…

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“… People have been trying to parse how dogs and people communicate with each other for a long time. Obviously they do—but hypothetically the form and content go way beyond sit and stay—and say something broader about language and animal cognition…..”

https://www.wired.com/story/what-a-border-collie-taught-a-linguist-about-language/?mbid=nl_81817_p2&CNDID=46211781 

[Ed.: We might learn something about social engineering while we’re doing it, too. Did you see that ad on Wired for how to expand your focus group research? ]