Tag Archives: intelligence

human intelligence

human intelligence

Big Brother does not watch us, by his choice. We watch him, by ours. There is no need for wardens or gates or Ministries of Truth. When a population becomes distracted by trivia, when cultural life is redefined as a perpetual round of entertainments, when serious public conversation becomes a form of baby-talk, when, in short, a people become an audience and their public business a vaudeville act, then a nation finds itself at risk; a culture-death is a clear possibility.

— Professor Neil Postman

“… television is a “dream come true” for an authoritarian society.

Television isolates people so they are not joining together to govern themselves. As clinical psychologist Bruce Levine notes, viewing television puts one in a brain state that makes it difficult to think critically, and it quiets and subdues a population. And spending one’s free time isolated and watching TV interferes with our ability to translate our outrage over governmental injustice into activism, and thus makes it easier to accept an authority’s version of society and life.

Supposedly the reason why television—and increasingly movies—are so effective in subduing and pacifying us is that viewers are mesmerized by what TV-insiders call “technical events.” These, according to Levine, are “quick cuts, zoom-ins, zoom-outs, rolls, pans, animation, music, graphics, and voice-overs, all of which lure viewers to continue watching even though they have no interest in the content.” Such technical events, which many action films now incorporate, spellbind people to continue watching.

Televised entertainment, no matter what is being broadcast, has become the nation’s new drug high. Researchers found that “almost immediately after turning on the TV, subjects reported feeling more relaxed, and because this occurs so quickly and the tension returns so rapidly after the TV is turned off, people are conditioned to associate TV viewing with a lack of tension.”

Not surprisingly, the United States is one of the highest TV-viewing nations in the world.

Indeed, a Nielsen study reports that American screen viewing is at an all-time high. For example, the average American watches approximately 151 hours of television per month. That does not include the larger demographic of screen-watchers who watch their entertainment via their laptops, personal computers, cell phones, tablets and so on.

Historically, television has been used by those in authority to quiet citizen unrest and pacify disruptive people. In fact, television-viewing has also been a proven tactic for ensuring compliance in prisons. “Faced with severe overcrowding and limited budgets for rehabilitation and counseling, more and more prison officials are using TV to keep inmates quiet,” according to Newsweek. Joe Corpier, a convicted murderer, when interviewed said, “If there’s a good movie, it’s usually pretty quiet through the whole institution.”

In other words, television and other screen viewing not only helps to subdue people but, as Levine concludes, it also zombifies and pacifies us and subverts democracy.

Television viewing, no matter what we’re collectively watching—whether it’s American Idol, the presidential debates or the Super Bowl—is a group activity that immobilizes us and mesmerizes us with collective programming. In fact, research also shows that regardless of the programming, viewers’ brain waves slow down, thus transforming them into a more passive, nonresistant state.

As such, television watching today results in passive group compliance in much the same way that marching was used by past regimes to create group indoctrination. Political advisor Bertram Gross documents how Adolf Hitler employed marching as a technique to mobilize people in groups by immobilizing them. Hitler and his regime leaders discovered that when people gather in groups and do the same thing—such as marching or cheering at an entertainment or sporting event—they became passive, non-thinking non-individuals.

By replacing “marching” with electronic screen devices, we have the equivalent of Hitler’s method of population control. Gross writes:

As a technique of immobilizing people, marching requires organization and, apart from the outlay costs involved, organized groups are a potential danger. They might march to a different drum or in the wrong direction…. TV is more effective. It captures many more people than would ever fill the streets by marching—and without interfering with automobile traffic.

Equally disturbing is a university study which indicates that we become less aware of our individual selves and moral identity in a group. The study’s findings strongly suggest that when we act in groups, we tend to consider our moral behavior less while moving in lockstep with the group. Thus, what the group believes or does, be it violence or inhumanity, does not seem to lessen the need to be a part of a group, whether it be a mob or political gathering….

https://www.lewrockwell.com/2016/02/john-w-whitehead/tv-football-politics/ 

via

http://www.strike-the-root.com/ 

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http://www.drjohnm.dreamhosters.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/Screen-Shot-2016-02-03-at-6.12.37-AM-216×300.png

“…. a new proposal from a group of medical editors is big news. The proposal would require that authors of studies share their raw data as a condition of publication in the journal. Medical researchers will have six months after a study is published to share the data.

This utterly disrupts the status quo. Currently, raw data has remained the property of either the scientists or the sponsor of the trial. It’s hard work designing a trial, collecting the data, and doing the analyses. Scientists, therefore, would often write many papers from the datasheets, sometimes over the course of years. These datasheets provided the gratification delayed for the grunt work of research.

Publications are the currency of progress in academics.

If this proposal is enacted, outside researchers, who had no connection to the study, can look at the data and do their own analyses. They can verify the findings, try to disprove the findings, or ask different questions. Think about that. Is it right that almost anyone with a laptop can benefit from the hard work of the original researchers?

Another issue here is the importance of honoring the patients who volunteered to be experimented on. These people are owed a great debt: to maximize the knowledge generated from the experiment. Would any patient consent to a study if their data was not used to advance science?

My essay on this was one of the toughest I’ve written. It took hours upon hours. I tried to see the proposal from both sides. An outsider sees obvious advantages, but researchers have serious concerns.

The title is linked below:

To Believe in Science Is to Believe in Data Sharing …”

http://www.drjohnm.org/2016/02/science-needs-data-sharing-like-sports-needs-doping-controls/

The author is “a cardiac electrophysiologist practicing in Louisville KY. I am also a husband to a palliative care doctor, a father, a bike racer, and a regular columnist at theHeart.org | Medscape

 

http://www.wahlbrinck.de/catcherintherye/images/rye.jpg

 

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Human Intelligence and Open Source Technologies

by Robert Steele on February 1, 2016

“… I worry about artificial stupidity being deeply embedded in bureaucratic and machine processes that take on a life of their own…. I was one of the first “digital innovators” for the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA). They built the Artificial Intelligence Staff in the Office of Information Technology (OIT/AIS) around me, so when I tell you I am worried about artificial stupidity being embedded in bureaucratic work processes, please believe me, I have seen a trillion dollars’ worth of waste in the last quarter century [average of $40 billion a year for each of 25 years]. Mostly secret, overwhelmingly technical, the investments in technology by the US intelligence community are predominantly useless in terms of creating a prosperous world at peace, a world that works for all…..

Singularity, apart from its obliviousness to true costs that sharply limit future growth irrespective of the advance of technology, firmly believes that machines will overtake humans, whose brains have been under development for millions of years.  It also blithely assumes that displacing human labor and engagement with machines – never mind the true costs – will not have social consequences including mass unrest and eventual violence.

As an intelligence professional – both a former spy and leader of analysts – I have watched the National Security Agency (NSA), one example within the trillion in waste I cite above, spend hundreds of millions of dollars in the past quarter century. NSA never been able to process more than 1% of the data they collect [and is even more paralyzed by data overload now that mass surveillance is the norm]. Nor has NSA been effective with the data they do process, for lack of human linguists skilled in Arabic and Hebrew, among 183 languages we do not speak well in the USA. Here is what James Bamford says in the very last sentence of his book, Body of Secrets: Anatomy of the Ultra-Secret National Security Agency  (Anchor, 2002):

Eventually NSA may secretly achieve the ultimate in quickness, compatibility, and efficiency-a computer with petaflop and higher speeds shrunk into a container about a liter in size, and powered by only about ten watts of power: the human brain.

I won’t belabor the limitations of computers, my latest article, Applied Collective Intelligence 2.0, forthcoming in Technological Forecasting and Social Change, addressed the realities that constrain machine intelligence. My purpose in this essay is to advance a concept for saving civilization by integrating human intelligence and a full range of open source technology and information. The idea is to deploy open source concepts across all man-machine domains, not only the information technology domain.

Why does human intelligence matter right now and going forward? Leaving aside the many limitations of computers, which are only as smart as their dumbest line of code and their smallest bits of data in combination; let’s start with the reality that over 80% of what we need to know is not in digital form. In fact the true figure is probably closer to 95% — I am being conservative – and because we only process 1% of Big Data that is collected, according to Mary Meeker, this means that the machine world is working with a tiny fraction–.002 to be exact–of the available relevant data.  If you add to that the fact that we are not doing zero-based economic analysis or true cost economics and currently do not have more than baby dosages of data, we end up with what Chris Hedges calls, in a book by this title, Empire of Illusion: The End of Literacy and the Triumph of Spectacle .

A blind faith – that is, one that ignores the true costs in resources and process redesign – in AI and VR to suddenly illuminate our world is dangerous. Only with true-cost accounting, applied predictively to current trends, can we see how challenging are the problems our species –not just humans but all living creatures – face today in the face of resource limitations.

There is certainly a great deal to be said for augmented human intelligence through the use of machine-assisted processing and analysis. Striking that balance, what some call hybrid intelligence, does offer real opportunities for massive positive change. Some researchers, such as Google’s in house singularity maven  Ray Kurzweil, believe the machines will triumph and leave us behind; others including me believe machines will augment but never displace humans with their diversity, imagination, and mortality – it is mortality that underlies ethics.

This is an important machine “glitch” seems difficult to resolve: ethics are beyond the ken of a machine. We fool ourselves into thinking code can be written to manage ethical questions. A machine follows instructions, which may seem to be logically complete, but cannot account for novel issues. When AI is reported to make breakthroughs in intelligence, it is often the product of engineers falling in love with their inventions’ output instead of an expression of organic emerging intelligence.

In this specific regard – the domain of intelligence whether human or artificial – I advance three human-centric propositions for consideration.

First, brought forward from my invited 1993 lecture to Paul Allen’s INTERVAL think tank, I suggest

You must avoid at all costs any techniques or tools which isolate individuals or give them the false perception that they can exist remotely, or in their own “virtual” worlds. That is a narcotic and narcissistic vision, and like narcotics and the pool of Narcissus, will ultimately lead to death by overdose or death by drowning.

Second, if you do not embrace full employment (whether in labor or arts), you risk spreading a fatal social disease, one that could lead to social erosion so great as to topple any technical and bureaucratic towers. People seek meaning. Without work, they will find meaning in tearing down the institutions that reject their contributions.

Third and last, mindful that Homo sapiens is in theory supposed to both human and thinking, and with a bow to Micah Sifry’s book The Big Disconnect: Why The Internet Hasn’t Transformed Politics (Yet) , as well as my own Foreword to Stephen E. Arnold’s CyberOSINT: Next Generation Information Access, I would point out that we still do not have properly integrated and universally-available tools for information-sharing and sense-making.

Machine intelligence and complex systems integration is expensive and a work in progress. Now stir into that brew our ignoring the 95% or so of the information that is not digital and in a language not supported by today’s machine translation systems or our own loosely-education [?] population. We are operating at 2% of our potential, at best, and falling short as both man and machine.

The graphic below illuminates this idea of information being largely beyond the reach of existing machines and machines likely in the future. Video recognition is very poor. Language recognition outside a few languages is still not adequate for most used. Document recognition is poor with respect to handwritten and unconventional script documents. And so on.

Examine the legend on the image below. Roughly 1% of written scientific papers are published, and of those that are published, perhaps 5% are accessed by more than a handful of individual. One percent of five percent is .0005 – not one tenth of knowledge, or one hundredth or one thousandth, but five ten-thousandth of the published knowledge gain “traction,” and this generally in the English language. The unpublished knowledge may as well not exist at all.

Published and unpublished information in 183 other languages, of which 33 are major international languages and one of them, Arabic, includes eleven substantive modern variations, is generally not accessed effectively.  Similarly, “gray literature” or limited edition publications specific to localities, is even less accessible – one percent of one percent as a speculative calculation.

Finally, there is no global index of subject matter experts (especially those that do not publish but have priceless hard-earned local knowledge)…..

[snip!]

https://www.singularityweblog.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/access-to-scientific-papers.jpg

Let us now make the leap from the present infatuation with taking information technology toward the singularity goal of making humans redundant. Let us contemplate instead the wholeness of society – not just information society, but society across all physical domains. Imagine a world in which everything is open.

Most are familiar with the concepts of Open Source Software and Open Source Hardware. A few realize that these two concepts are insufficient to achieve anything resembling a singularity. Apart from the reality that a machine is utterly stupid without data, algorithms, and an audience, there is the small matter of civilization beyond the box — what else must be in being for society to advance?

Below is a starting point that I created with some help from Michel Bauwens, founder of the Peer to Peer (P2P) Foundation, and Marcin Jakubowski, creator of Open Source Ecology and the Global Village Construction Set.

https://www.singularityweblog.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/Principle-Elements-of-Open-Source.jpg

In my view, if we are to achieve exponential growth and infinite wealth for all humanity, we must integrate three intellectual concepts across all domains from agricultural to water: Holistic analytics (everything is connected), True cost economics (embrace the truth), and Open source everything engineering (affordable, inter-operable, and scalable).

There is much to be said about Eco-Villages and Transition Townes, and some small enclaves are eco-hacking the future with over one hundred different open-source applications toward a fossil-free zero-waste society.  This is brilliant stuff, but it will not scale as quickly or, more pointedly, we can ask if it will even scale to any degree and in time so as to avoid the The Sixth Extinction: An Unnatural History .  However much singularity aficionados may cheer for nirvana, time is the one strategic variable we cannot buy nor replace.

It is Smart Cities and Smart Nations that represent the very grand challenge of achieving a prosperous world at peace, a world that works for all. Everything being done now, from the Climate Change agreements to Paris to the Smart Cities initiative in India, is poorly thought through, unaffordable, and unachievable at scale – at sustainable scale.

What is missing from the local to global conversation – apart from honest governance —  is a shared grasp of how very important it is to integrate holistic analytics (for threats, policies,  demographics) with true cost economics (cradle to grave for all artifacts all the time), and open source everything engineering.

Below is a depiction I created to improve on an existing program in the United Kingdom that purports to represent the state of the art in Embedded Intelligence – it was lacking the three essentials shown at the bottom of the graphic.

https://www.singularityweblog.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/Embedded-Intelligence.jpg

The technocracy has lost sight of the humanities – most of them have never read E. O. Wilson’s book, Consilience: The Unity of Knowledge  and have no idea why the sciences need the humanities, a question that is answered most ably in this book.

To create a truly Smart City or Smart nation it is not acceptable to limits one’s definition of the necessities to broadband access. We must design cities by keeping firmly in mind what Bionic City pioneer Melissa Sterry suggests, that when nature is designing anything, it comes without fraud, waste, or abuse. Every single artifact must achieve what Buckminster Fuller called “ephemeralism,” avoiding all forms of waste.

For many this will mean pressed brick shelters and the fullest possible use of the Global Village Construction Set being created by Marcin Jakubowski. It will also mean broad acceptance of Peer to Peer forms of culture, economy, governance, and society as defined so ably by Michel Bauwens.

I have published an essay on Saving Civilization, delivered a memorandum to the Vice President of the United States on the need for an Open Source (Technologies) Agency, and provided a white paper to the Secretary General of the United Nations, so I will not belabor the elements here. My life’s work and my ambition for the future of humanity, are summed up in the below depiction of how I believe we must achieve man-machine intelligence with integrity across the whole.

https://www.singularityweblog.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/Education-Intelligence-Research.png

About the author:

Robert David Steele Vivas is a former spy, Marine Corps infantry officer, honorary hacker, past presidential candidate, and the top Amazon reviewer devoted to non-fiction, reading in 98 categories. He pioneered Open Source Intelligence (OSINT), teaching over 7,500 professionals from across 66 countries how to achieve decision-support (intelligence) with legal ethical methods. Author of many books and articles on intelligence and electoral reform, over time he morphed into a proponent for Open Source Everything Engineering (OSEE), publishing The Open-Source Everything Manifesto: Transparency, Truth, and Trust (Manifesto Series)  in 2012. A 2014 profile of him in The Guardian by Nafeez Ahmed earned 33,000 “likes” in three days and now stands at 68,000 “likes.” Learn more about him at http://robertdavidsteele.com.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ha4L9fI1800 [must see!]

https://www.singularityweblog.com/human-intelligence-and-open-source-technologies/ 

via  https://solari.com/blog/ 

 

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/12998524-the-open-source-everything-manifesto

 

The Open-Source Everything Manifesto: Transparency, Truth, and Trust

by Robert David Steele, Howard Bloom

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v2vC2nKyXWU (55 minutes)

 

 

Yep. I bought the book, and two others:

 

Moving the Needle: Get Clear, Get Free, and Get Going in Your Career, Business, and Life!

and

Coach Yourself to a New Career: 7 Steps to Reinventing Your Professional Life

 

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Added 2/5/16 ca. 9 PM:

http://www.phibetaiota.net/2014/12/2014-robert-steele-answer-on-leadership-with-annotated-bibliograph-pbi-posts/ 

 

 

 

mythical software (with two addenda)

The voice of the semi-official spokeswoman for the ruling clique, Martha Raddatz, crackles resonantly as if she had a personal investment when she announces the mortal attack on Major General Greene, a two star major general and the highest ranking official to have been killed in the Afghanistan war.

Martha Raddatz had had her ticket punched in all the right places, having been married to Ben Bradlee Jr. and the Obama Administration’s former FCC Commissioner, having held down a slot on the New York Times best-seller list, and having been spoofed on SNL. She also sports a hip hop ring tone.

But this isn’t about Martha: it’s about a mythical software with special powers and whether, as is claimed here by a “former Palantir field service rep”, it was being used on-scene at the Boston Marathon during the bombing.

 

Was there a field test of this technology during a pre-planned drill that was a cover for an op?  Or was, as is claimed, the technology in use to help catch the perps?

Who has funded the technology, and for what purposes?  Who are the company’s clients? What military contractor groups have access to the technology? How many police, security or governmental organizations are now using this technology in a domestic application? What has happened to the people who know?

What is truth, and what is purposeful disinformation or misdirection?

 

http://peoiews.apg.army.mil/images/mg-green-building.jpg

Greene was simply the highest ranking of the soldiers picked as targets the day that the “guardian angels” of NATO were apparently paying their attention elsewhere during yet another example  “of what has come to be known as a “green on blue” attack–that is, Afghan trainees at the base killing their Western trainers”. The role of a “guardian angel” is to “watch people’s backs and hopefully identify people that would be involved in those attacks,” Defense Secretary Leon Panetta told reporters during an Aug. 14 briefing at the Pentagon.

[ http://foreignpolicy.com/2012/08/14/guardian-angels-in-afghanistan/ ]

Here’s a detailed look at Major General Greene’s background in military skills, technology and engineering. The Pentagon, in their ultimate wisdom, decided he needs some time in a battle zone. His expertise was at the forefront of anti-IED technology, a suite of tools that process “huge amounts of battlefield data”. “The project used a controversial piece of military technology called Palantir.

 

http://www.washingtonian.com/articles/images/palantir.jpg

 

“…The Washington Times first reported in July about an internal battle within the Army. Commanders and intelligence officers in Afghanistan complained in messages to Army headquarters about the Defense Common Ground System.

Some asked for permission to buy Palantir, an off-the-shelf software platform that specializes in linking disparate bits of information to form a clear picture of the battlefield.

In some cases, Army officials involved in shielding the Defense Common Ground System from possible budget cuts viewed Palantir as a competitor and worked to shut off the requests.

Thursday’s news conference offered a different view.

The generals said the Defense Common Ground System, which has been in development for a decade, grew out of a giant gap in intelligence collection: There was no single database to bring together information in Afghanistan and look for links among suspected enemy fighters.

“We had a difficult time [in] what we were collecting and even what it was collecting, when it was collecting and where it was collecting,” said Maj. Gen. Stephen Fogarty, who heads the Army Intelligence and Security Command. He has held senior posts in special operations, Central Command and Afghanistan.

“Data from all that collection resided in different databases that were often incompatible,” Gen. Fogarty said.

A different tale

Maj. Gen. Harold J. Greene, the Army’s deputy for acquisition and systems management, said the Defense Common Ground System “replaced nine different intelligence systems.”

“This really is a change in methodology,” Gen. Greene said. “It reduces the amount of hardware we have to buy and the footprint on the ground.”

Intelligence processing has become especially important in fighting terrorists such as the Taliban, who wear no uniforms and hide among the population, making them difficult to identify.

“It’s really the Army intelligence-analyst weapon system,” Gen. Fogarty said. “DCGS has been used effectively in Iraq, Afghanistan and around the world by both conventional and our special operations forces. We believe it enhances soldiers’ situational awareness and improves commanders’ ability to protect the force.”

The Times has obtained a series of messages from combatants that tell a far different story.

Officers lauded Palantir for its ability to zero in on data that helped soldiers find roadside bombs, the No. 1 killer of troops in Afghanistan. They complained that the Army-issued Defense Common Ground System was too slow.

A November 2011 memo from the 82nd Airborne Division provides an example:

“Solving very hard analytical problems takes several days when using existing tools against these data sources,” the message states. “In our experience in using the Palantir platform against the same problems, we were able to reduce this time to a few hours. This shortfall translates into operational opportunities missed and unnecessary risk to force.” …

“Every intelligence officer wants the best capability available,” Gen. Fogarty said. “People have preferences. We have some very aggressive analysts. Frankly, they drive us to continue to improve the system.”

He asserted that once a brigade opts to use Palantir “that data is not completely available, is not interoperable” with other intelligence systems.

“The ease of use [with Palantir], that has been very important to them,” he said.”

http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2012/dec/20/army-rolls-out-brass-to-defend-anti-ied-software/ 

 

 

http://e27.co/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/Palantir-Logo-e1352292275414.jpeg

 

The deceased general’s daughter was a vice president at ManTech_International

 

“… The commander in chief has said nothing about the incident, leaving it to the Defense Department and his own press secretary, Josh Earnest, to discuss it…..”

http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/checkpoint/wp/2014/08/06/obamas-silence-on-death-of-maj-gen-harold-greene-comes-under-fire/ 

https://pbs.twimg.com/media/BvFWNShIcAAEggy.jpg

 

 

http://www.naturalnews.com/gallery/articles/The_Craft_Three_Guys-600.jpg

http://www.infowars.com/photos-private-military-operatives-hired-to-work-the-boston-marathon-with-black-backpacks-radiation-detectors-tactical-gear/

The Boston Globe acknolwedged that the Police had deployed “air patrols, K9 units, and more than 1,000 uniformed officers and soldiers along the 26-mile course and the finish line,” but it made no mention of the private contracting of soldiers-for-hire like the Craft International.

Meanwhile, Reuters reported that a top official for the Massachusetts state Homeland Security Department, Undersecretary Kurt Schwartz, told a group at Harvard University that his agency had “planned” for a possible bombing attack on the marathon, even running a “table-top” exercise about such an event a week before the race.

http://politicalblindspot.org/media-blackout-boston-bombing-secrecy-surrounding-private-military-contractors-craft-international-and-the-killing-of-their-founder/ 

See also:

http://soldiersystems.net/tag/craft-international/ 

 

 

http://willyloman.files.wordpress.com/2013/04/advon-team.jpg?w=468&h=361

http://fas.org/irp/doddir/army/fm3-11-22.pdf (See Pages D-4 and D-4)

 

 

http://dougernst.files.wordpress.com/2012/01/chris-kyle-american-sniper-1.jpg 

The rabbit’s hole in re: Chris Kyle

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2528850/Wife-murdered-sniper-Chris-Kyle-sues-bosses-Craft-International-founded-claiming-conspired-steal-firm.html

http://nodisinfo.com/did-craft-internationals-chris-kyle-fake-his-death/

 

 

“Part of the reason green-on-blue attacks have subsided since 2012 is because security measures were put in place to prevent such incidents following the spike (there were only two  green-on-blue attacks in 2008, five in 2008 and 2009, and 16 in 2011, according to a tally compiled by the Long War Journal). Among the changes to security were “guardian angels,” or NATO soldiers who watch over NATO and Afghan troops. Then-U.S. Defense Secretary Leon Panetta announced the plan in August 2012, according to Foreign Policy.”

http://www.ibtimes.com/what-green-blue-attack-killing-us-major-general-harold-greene-just-third-insider-attack-1649920

 

Program Executive Officer for Intelligence, Electronic Warfare and Sensors…

Maj. General Harold Greeene spent four years as the U.S. Army’s Project Manager, Battle Command.

http://usarmy.vo.llnwd.net/e2/c/downloads/271929.pdf

 

intelligence, electronic warfare, and sensors,

Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Program_Executive_Officer

http://www.spacewar.com/reports/US_Army_Electronic_Warfare_Needs_Receive_Heightened_Emphasis_999.html

 

 

Intelligence, Electronic Warfare and Sensors in BattleCommand

http://fas.org/irp/program/collect/docs/990609-asb_gust/index.htm 

 

 

Palantir Valued at $2.5 Billion or More

By EVELYN M. RUSLI date published MAY 6, 2011 12:05 PM

http://dealbook.nytimes.com/2011/05/06/palantir-valued-at-2-5-billion-or-more/?_r=0 

 

“… In addition to Facebook, Thiel has made early-stage investments in numerous startups (personally or through his venture capital fund), including Booktrack, Slide, LinkedIn, Friendster, Rapleaf, Geni.com, Yammer, Yelp, Inc., Powerset, Practice Fusion, MetaMed, Vator, Palantir Technologies, IronPort, Votizen, Asana, Big Think, Caplinked, Quora, Rypple, TransferWise, Nanotronics Imaging, Stripe, and Legendary Entertainment. Slide, LinkedIn, Geni.com, and Yammer were founded by Thiel’s former colleagues at PayPal: Slide by Levchin, Linkedin by Reid Hoffman, Yelp by Jeremy Stoppelman, and Geni.com and Yammer by David Sacks. Fortune magazine reports that PayPal alumni have founded or invested in dozens of startups with an aggregate value of around $30 billion. In Silicon Valley circles, Thiel is colloquially referred to as the “Don of the PayPal Mafia“, as noted in the Fortune magazine article.[29] Thiel’s views on management are highly regarded,[by whom?] especially his famous observation that start-up success is highly correlated with low CEO pay.[citation needed]

Thiel founded Palantir Technologies funded by the CIA’s venture capital arm In-Q-Tel.[30]

Thiel believes in the importance and desirability of a technological singularity.[37]

Thiel is listed as a member of the Steering Committee of the Bilderberg Group, a private, annual gathering of intellectual figures, political leaders and business executives.[55] 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peter_Thiel 

http://tolkiengateway.net/w/images/thumb/d/dc/Raphael_Rau_-_Palantir.jpg/250px-Raphael_Rau_-_Palantir.jpg

“…. the government now has software made by Palantir Technologies, a Silicon Valley company that’s become the darling of the intelligence and law enforcement communities.

The day Fikri drives to Orlando, he gets a speeding ticket, which triggers an alert in the CIA’s Palantir system. An analyst types Fikri’s name into a search box and up pops a wealth of information pulled from every database at the government’s disposal. There’s fingerprint and DNA evidence for Fikri gathered by a CIA operative in Cairo; video of him going to an ATM in Miami; shots of his rental truck’s license plate at a tollbooth; phone records; and a map pinpointing his movements across the globe. All this information is then displayed on a clearly designed graphical interface that looks like something Tom Cruise would use in a Mission: Impossible movie.

As the CIA analyst starts poking around on Fikri’s file inside of Palantir, a story emerges. A mouse click shows that Fikri has wired money to the people he had been calling in Syria. Another click brings up CIA field reports on the Syrians and reveals they have been under investigation for suspicious behavior and meeting together every day over the past two weeks. Click: The Syrians bought plane tickets to Miami one day after receiving the money from Fikri. To aid even the dullest analyst, the software brings up a map that has a pulsing red light tracing the flow of money from Cairo and Syria to Fikri’s Miami condo. That provides local cops with the last piece of information they need to move in on their prey before he strikes.

Fikri isn’t real—he’s the John Doe example Palantir uses in product demonstrations that lay out such hypothetical examples. The demos let the company show off its technology without revealing the sensitive work of its clients. Since its founding in 2004, the company has quietly developed an indispensable tool employed by the U.S. intelligence community in the war on [of] terrorism. Palantir technology essentially solves the Sept. 11 intelligence problem. The Digital Revolution dumped oceans of data on the law enforcement establishment but provided feeble ways to make sense of it. In the months leading up to the 2001 attacks, the government had all the necessary clues to stop the al Qaeda perpetrators: They were from countries known to harbor terrorists, who entered the U.S. on temporary visas, had trained to fly civilian airliners, and purchased one-way airplane tickets on that terrible day.

An organization like the CIA or FBI can have thousands of different databases, each with its own quirks: financial records, DNA samples, sound samples, video clips, maps, floor plans, human intelligence reports from all over the world. Gluing all that into a coherent whole can take years. Even if that system comes together, it will struggle to handle different types of data—sales records on a spreadsheet, say, plus video surveillance images. What Palantir (pronounced Pal-an-TEER) does, says Avivah Litan, an analyst at Gartner (IT), is “make it really easy to mine these big data sets.” The company’s software pulls off one of the great computer science feats of the era: It combs through all available databases, identifying related pieces of information, and puts everything together in one place.

Palantir has built a customer list that includes the U.S. Defense Dept., CIA, FBI, Army, Marines, Air Force, the police departments of New York and Los Angeles, and a growing number of financial institutions trying to detect bank fraud. These deals have turned the company into one of the quietest success stories in Silicon Valley—it’s on track to hit $250 million in sales this year—and a candidate for an initial public offering. Palantir has been used to find suspects in a case involving the murder of a U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement special agent, and to uncover bombing networks in Syria, Afghanistan, and Pakistan. “It’s like plugging into the Matrix,” says a Special Forces member stationed in Afghanistan who requested anonymity out of security concerns. “The first time I saw it, I was like, ‘Holy crap. Holy crap. Holy crap.’ ”

[snip]

… Before joining Palantir, Karp had spent years studying in Germany under Jürgen Habermas, the most prominent living representative of the Frankfurt School, the group of neo-Marxist philosophers and sociologists. After getting a PhD in philosophy from the University of Frankfurt—he also has a degree from Stanford Law School—Karp drifted from academia and dabbled in stocks. He proved so good at it that, with the backing of a handful of European billionaires, he set up a money management firm called the Caedmon Group.

[Ed.: See also http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frankfurt_school and the reference to Habermas by Elihu Katz, the c-author of “Media Events”: http://www.thesullenbell.com/2015/01/05/communications-21st-century/ ]

[snip]

Palantir’s name refers to the “seeing stones” in Lord of the Rings that provide a window into other parts of Middle-earth. They’re magical tools created by elves that can serve both good and evil. Bad wizards use them to keep in touch with the overlord in Mordor; good wizards can peer into them to check up on the peaceful, innocent Hobbits of the Shire. As Karp explains with a straight face, his company’s grand, patriotic mission is to “protect the Shire.”

Most of Palantir’s government work remains classified, but information on some cases has trickled out. In April 2010, security researchers in Canada used Palantir’s software to crack a spy operation dubbed Shadow Network that had, among other things, broken into the Indian Defense Ministry and infiltrated the Dalai Lama’s e-mail account. Palantir has also been used to unravel child abuse and abduction cases. Palantir “gives us the ability to do the kind of link-and-pattern analysis we need to build cases, identify perpetrators, and rescue children,” says Ernie Allen, CEO of the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children. The software recently helped NCMEC analysts link an attempted abduction with previous reports of the suspect to the center’s separate cyber-tip line—and plot that activity on a map. “We did it within 30 seconds,” Allen says. “It is absolutely a godsend for us.”

In Afghanistan, U.S. Special Operations Forces use Palantir to plan assaults. They type a village’s name into the system and a map of the village appears, detailing the locations of all reported shooting skirmishes and IED, or improvised explosive device, incidents. Using the timeline function, the soldiers can see where the most recent attacks originated and plot their takeover of the village accordingly. The Marines have spent years gathering fingerprint and DNA evidence from IEDs and tried to match that against a database of similar information collected from villagers. By the time the analysis results came back, the bombers would be long gone. Now field operatives are uploading the samples from villagers into Palantir and turning up matches from past attacks on the spot, says Samuel Reading, a former Marine who works in Afghanistan for NEK Advanced Securities Group, a U.S. military contractor. “It’s the combination of every analytical tool you could ever dream of,” Reading says. “You will know every single bad guy in your area.”

Palantir has found takers for its data mining system closer to home, too. Wall Street has been particularly receptive. Every year, the company holds a conference to promote its technology, and the headcount swelled from about 50 people at past events to 1,000 at the most recent event in October. “I saw bankers there that don’t go to any other conferences,” says Gartner’s Litan. The banks have set Palantir’s technology loose on their transaction databases, looking for fraudsters, trading insights, and even new ways to price mortgages. Guy Chiarello, chief information officer for JPMorgan Chase (JPM), says Palantir’s technology turns “data landfills into gold mines.” The bank has a Palantir system for fraud detection and plans to use the technology to better tailor marketing campaigns to consumers. “Google (GOOG) unlocked the Internet with its search engine,” Chiarello says. “I think Palantir is on the way to doing a similar thing inside the walls of corporate data.”

Using Palantir technology, the FBI can now instantly compile thorough dossiers on U.S. citizens, tying together surveillance video outside a drugstore with credit-card transactions, cell-phone call records, e-mails, airplane travel records, and Web search information. Christopher Soghoian, a graduate fellow at the Center for Applied Cybersecurity in the School of Informatics and Computing at Indiana University, worries that Palantir will make these agencies ever hungrier consumers of every piece of personal data. “I don’t think Palantir the firm is evil,” he says. “I think their clients could be using it for evil things.”

Soghoian points out that Palantir’s senior legal adviser, Bryan Cunningham, authored an amicus brief three years ago supporting the Bush Administration’s position in the infamous warrantless wiretapping case and defended its monitoring domestic communication without search warrants. Another event that got critics exercised: A Palantir engineer, exposed by the hacker collective Anonymous earlier this year for participating in a plot to break into the PCs of WikiLeaks supporters, was quietly rehired by the company after being placed on leave….”

More:

http://www.businessweek.com/magazine/palantir-the-vanguard-of-cyberterror-security-11222011.html 

http://entertainment.time.com/2013/06/07/prism-speculation-and-the-lord-of-the-rings-the-palantir-connection/

Special forces and Marines are embracing the commercial software Palantir for analyzing battlefield intelligence even as the Army seeks to downplay its effectiveness, according to a new report from government auditors.

http://defensetech.org/2013/07/01/special-forces-marines-embrace-palantir-software/ 

 

 

911stealth E-4B Washington Pentagon

Mark Howard Gaffney

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vAVz3cHCqjk (7:37)

“… The E-4Bs are usually assigned to Offutt Air Force Base, near Omaha, Nebraska, which is also the home of STRATCOM, i.e., the Strategic Command (formerly SAC, the Strategic Air Command). The squadron is under the operational control of the Joint Chiefs of Staff,xxv although it is maintained by the First Airborne Command and Control Squadron (ACCS), a part of the 55th Strategic Reconnaissance Wing. Incidentally, the Wing’s motto is Videmus Omnia, which means: “We see all.” ….”

 

http://www.truth-out.org/news/item/16943-outsourced-intelligence-how-the-fbi-and-cia-use-private-contractors-to-monitor-social-media 

 

More on Palantir:

http://vidgrids.com/u/palantir [An online video search platform…. Just press “search” to find all the videos on Palantir]

Palantir’s advisors include Condoleezza Rice and former CIA director George Tenet…

“They’re in a scary business,” says Electronic Frontier Foundation attorney Lee Tien. ACLU analyst Jay Stanley has written that Palantir’s software could enable a “true totalitarian nightmare, monitoring the activities of innocent Americans on a mass scale.”

http://www.forbes.com/sites/andygreenberg/2013/08/14/agent-of-intelligence-how-a-deviant-philosopher-built-palantir-a-cia-funded-data-mining-juggernaut/

 

http://archvlsi.ics.forth.gr/html_papers/INET98_Palantir/

http://www.businessweek.com/magazine/palantir-the-vanguard-of-cyberterror-security-11222011.html

http://www.crunchbase.com/organization/palantir-technologies

http://www.wired.co.uk/magazine/archive/2012/09/features/joining-the-dots

http://talkingpointsmemo.com/edblog/is-this-who-runs-prism?ref=fpblg

http://archvlsi.ics.forth.gr/html_papers/INET98_Palantir/

https://analyzethe.us/faq/

http://www.fastcoexist.com/1681402/how-terrorist-hunting-software-saved-lives-during-hurricane-sandy

http://www.businessinsider.com/r-cohens-sac-taps-analytics-firm-palantir-to-monitor-employees-2014-19

http://www.theverge.com/2013/6/7/4406760/palantir-denies-prism-software-related-to-surveillance

http://www.accenture.com/SiteCollectionDocuments/PDF/Accenture-Impact-Of-Tech-Palantir.pdf

 

‘Big Data’: Bilderberg Firm Palantir Works for NSA Spy Agenda

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tdrPwnK-P40 (14:21)

EXPOSED: DHS Planned Drill Targeting Patriot Groups w/ Backpack Bombs Before Boston Marathon Bombing

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IOk6_x1HFWY (11:42)

 

 

“… Palantir sells a powerful line of data-mining and analysis software that maps out human social networks for counter-intelligence purposes, and is in huge demand throughout government and in the financial and banking industries. Its customers includes the CIA, the FBI, the U.S. Special Operations Command, the Army, Marines and Air Force, as well as the police departments of New York and Los Angeles.

The NSA, which intercepts and analyzes global communications traffic, is a highly likely client as well. It was “eyeing” Palantir in 2009, according to the Wall Street Journal. One laudatory media profile called it “the darling of the intelligence and law enforcement communities.” …[snip]

In 2005, In-Q-Tel, the CIA’s venture capital fund, invested about $2 million in the company, and CIA officials began introducing Palantir to other intelligence agencies and the Pentagon. It is currently valued at around $8 billion, according to Karp.

“Palantir was developed to address the most complex information analysis and security challenges faced by the U.S. intelligence, military, and law enforcement communities,” In-Q-Tel says on its website. The “Palantir platform,” it adds, “uniquely leverages [the] innate human ability” to identify patterns in information “with advanced computational power to accelerate the analysis of data at massive scale.”

C4ISR Journal, a specialty publication on defense technologies, explains that Palantir now uses these programs to work “with defense and intelligence agencies to merge signals intelligence, imagery, message traffic and other documents in a database that analysts can use to search for information.”

A detailed profile in the Wall Street Journal described how Palantir “tags, or categorizes, every bit of data separately, whether it be a first name, a last name or a phone number,” thus allowing analysts to “quickly tag information themselves as it arrives in the form of field reports from spies overseas, and to see who else in the agency is doing similar research so they can share their findings.”

Palantir has been particularly useful in tracking terrorist and insurgent networks in Iraq, Afghanistan and elsewhere that build improvised explosive devices (IEDs), which would make it ideal to track the Tsarnaev brothers’ network in Boston.

And it so happens that one of Palantir’s top executives, Michael Leiter, is an “analyst” for NBC News as well as MSNBC.

Leiter, who started at NBC last fall, is the former director of the National Counter Terrorism Center, the inter-agency situation room in Northern Virginia where the U.S. government synchronizes all of its intelligence analysis. As I pointed out in a recent article in Salon, he is almost always introduced in connection with the NCTC rather than as someone affiliated with Palantir. This is misleading, to say the least…..”

[Ed.: As may be the author….]

http://timshorrock.com/?p=1811 

 

 

Addendum:

“… Writing for The Guardian in 2011, Brown exposed a plan by three technology security companies — HBGary Federal, a subsidiary of ManTech International, Palantir, and Berico Technologies — to hire out their information war capabilities to corporations which perceived threats in organizations, like WikiLeaks, an organization that publishes secret information, and people, such as Glenn Greenwald, an American journalist, who revealed many of Edward Snowden’s accounts about mass public surveillance.

Brown wrote that the connection was part of a program called Romas/COIN. Writing for Project PM, he explained the nefarious capabilities of this program:

“Unprecedented surveillance capabilities are being produced by an industry that works in secret on applications that are nonetheless funded by the American public – and which in some cases are used against that very same public. Their products are developed on demand for an intelligence community that is not subject to Congressional oversight and which has been repeatedly shown to have misused its existing powers in ways that violate U.S. law as well as American ideals.”

HBGary’s CEO Aaron Barr was forced to step down as a result of the revelations…..”

SOURCE: SEAN NEVINS

http://www.blacklistednews.com/What_Barrett_Brown’s_Three_Remaining_Charges_Mean_For_Journalism/40613/0/38/38/Y/M.html  

 

 

ADDENDUM #2:

 

 

Leaked Palantir Doc Reveals Uses, Specific Functions and Key Clients

January 12th, 2015 

Via: TechCrunch:

Palantir’s data analysis solution targets three industries: government, the finance sector and legal research. Each of these industries must wrestle with massive sets of data. To do this, Palantir’s toolsets are aimed at massive data caches, allowing litigators and the police to make connections otherwise invisible. For example, a firm hired by the Securities Investment Protection Corporation used Palantir’s software to sort through the mountains of data, over 40 years of records, to convict Ponzi schemer Bernie Madoff (of all things).

The document confirms that Palantir is employed by multiple US Government agencies. One of the company’s first contracts was with the Joint IED Defeat Organization in 2006. From 2007-2009 Palantir’s work in Washington expanded from eight pilots to more than 50 programs.

As of 2013, Palantir was used by at least 12 groups within the US Government including the CIA, DHS, NSA, FBI, the CDC, the Marine Corps, the Air Force, Special Operations Command, West Point, the Joint IED-defeat organization and Allies, the Recovery Accountability and Transparency Board and the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children.

optimal human function

Guest Post:

Human intelligence or human awareness?

22.05.2014

By Robert J. Burrowes

The human organism, at birth, is capable of becoming an integrated whole. And it is only by becoming an integrated whole that it can function optimally. What does this mean?

In order to function optimally, the human organism requires that all mental functions – feelings, thoughts, memory, conscience, sensory perception (sight, sound, touch, smell, taste), truth register, intuition… – must all be developed and readily involved, without interference, in our life. If this happens, then all of these individual functions will play an integrated role in determining our behaviour in any given circumstance.

Under these conditions, the behaviour that would be generated should not be described as ‘intelligent’ or as ’emotionally’ or ‘sensorily’ driven: such behaviour should be described as ‘aware’ because it is based on a synthesis of all of the feedback our various mental functions can give us and the judgments that arise, in an integrated way, from this feedback. If we prioritise one function as more important, if we suppress our awareness of one or more functions (for any reason), then we disable a part of our holistic functioning to our detriment.

Many modern humans like to think that we are ‘intelligent’ and that it is this intelligence – which is somehow supposed to have superseded something more ‘primitive’ and ‘instinctive’ – that makes us ‘superior’. I believe it is the fact that humans have the potential to be integrated – making optimal use of millions of years of evolutionary pressures in so many respects (and which produced colour bifocal vision, for example) – that defines our true potential. I also believe that we are well short of reaching this potential so far, with the exception of the rare individual.

In brief, it is clear to me that I am more complete if I am ‘aware’ of and utilise all aspects of my being in an integrated way. If I am fully aware, then I learn quickly and easily or insight simply ‘drops’ on my being when I need it. There is no ‘work’, such as ‘thinking hard’, involved at all. Unfortunately, human socialisation works against the development of awareness by suppressing the development of vital mental functions. I will illustrate this point by discussing emotions.

Evolution has given each human being, at birth, the potential to develop a diverse range of emotions as one part of the sophisticated capacity they can use to respond immediately and appropriately to each unique circumstance that unfolds throughout their life. Unfortunately, human socialisation (which I call ‘terrorisation’) and, particularly, the ‘invisible’ and ‘utterly invisible’ violence that this entails, systematically destroys the human capacity to utilise emotional responses beyond those very few which are socially acceptable in the cultural context.

See ‘Why Violence?’

http://tinyurl.com/whyviolence

and

‘Fearless Psychology and Fearful Psychology: Principles and Practice’ http://anitamckone.wordpress.com/articles-2/fearless-and-fearful-psychology/ 

For example, if you prevent a child from behaving in accordance with their fear, they have no choice but to suppress their awareness of this fear. And this has disastrous consequences for the individual and, therefore, for us all.

In contrast, if we let children have their feelings from birth, and act on them as part of their integrated Self, no one would acquire the vast backlog of unfelt feelings which we then need to spend enormous energy fearfully suppressing for the rest of our lives while they continue to generate a phenomenal array of dysfunctional behaviours. This ongoing suppression, of course, only exacerbates our individual and collective dysfunctionalities frightfully and now manifests, for example, in having us on the brink of precipitating our own extinction, which I would have thought is quite unintelligent as well as being unaware.

The irony, of course, is that if you ask the most serious advocate of the ‘intellectual’ human thesis ‘When is the last time you had sex because it was a good idea?’ most of them would look at you as if you were mad. Even the ‘intellectual’ human advocates concede that feelings have their place, as long as they are ‘good’ feelings!

The problem is that modern human society is utterly antithetical to a wholesome human existence – what child wants to sit, bored out of their brain, in school all day? – but we can only make modern humans into compliant slaves by terrorising them into suppressing their awareness of how they feel and what they think. If we didn’t do this, an aware child would try school for ten minutes, promptly proclaim it boring and walk out. But we aren’t going to give children that much freedom are we? If we did, they might learn something for themselves that we don’t want them to learn! Freedom is too frightening: better to talk about it but do something totally other. Or limit ‘freedom’ to ourselves which, of course, makes it meaningless.

The Self-aware human being is intelligent because their mind is integrated. In contrast, an ‘intelligent’ individual who is unSelf-aware, because their mind is disintegrated, might engage in activities that are destructive of our species and the planet. I am sure that you can think of many examples.

If you wish to join the worldwide movement to end all violence and to create Self-aware individuals, you can sign online ‘The People’s Charter to Create a Nonviolent World’ http://thepeoplesnonviolencecharter.wordpress.com

The potential to achieve Self-awareness is an evolutionary gift. It must be nurtured. It is easily destroyed.

Robert J. Burrowes

Robert J. Burrowes has a lifetime commitment to understanding and ending human violence. He has done extensive research since 1966 in an effort to understand why human beings are violent and has been a nonviolent activist since 1981. He is the author of ‘Why Violence?’
http://tinyurl.com/whyviolence 

His email address is flametree@riseup.net
and his website is at http://robertjburrowes.wordpress.com

http://english.pravda.ru/science/earth/22-05-2014/127633-human_intelligence-0/