Tag Archives: leadership

conversational exchange

conversational exchange 

 

SPECIAL OFFER

25% Off the World’s Coolest Chart Art

Birds, space exploration, sneakers, superpowers, and more rendered in amazing detail by our friends at Pop Chart Lab. Use code ATLAS25 at checkout.

GET POSTERS OF YOUR FAVORITE STUFF»

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uJ8Ya1i3ZhA 

[&&]{**}[##]

It’s ‘Digital Heroin’: How Screens Turn Kids Into Psychotic Junkies

December 20th, 2016 by Kevin

My sons, aged 9 and 6, get 30 minutes of video (that I’ve approved) per day and then 1.5 hours of gaming on Saturdays and Sundays, assuming all homeschool lessons are completed.

As little screen time as this is, I’ve found that they have become obsessed with the stuff they encounter in the small windows of time they’re allowed screen access. We’re hearing about diamond swords and Endermen outside of screen time, for example.

Becky was against giving them any screen time at all, but I was worried that they would eventually grow up, encounter screens and become consumed with the whole mess. I met a guy who wasn’t allowed to watch any TV as a child who became really addicted to it as an adult. Also, they know about video games in the first place because they’ve seen my Crysis, Bioshock, Starcraft, etc. boxes on my bookshelf! If you’re a gamer and you don’t want your kids to be gamers: Definitely throw out the boxes and don’t let them know that you do it!

Misha Pemble-Belkin, from Restrepo, is probably the main reason I chose to dose my boys with small amounts of screen time. Raised by “hippy” pacifists, Belkin wasn’t allowed to play with toy guns or watch violent movies as a kid. He grew up, joined the U.S. Army and was happy to be killing people with a MK-19 automatic grenade launcher in Afghanistan. For parents who implement a lot of bans, I think there’s a lesson to be learned from Belkin.

I decided to try giving my boys modest amounts of screen time (as indicated above), but I wonder if it was the right thing to do. My wife still thinks that zero screen time is the way to go. It might be that there’s no good answer and that some options are just less bad than others. I do get a feeling, however, that outright banning would backfire badly.

Via: New York Post:

There’s a reason that the most tech-cautious parents are tech designers and engineers. Steve Jobs was a notoriously low-tech parent. Silicon Valley tech executives and engineers enroll their kids in no-tech Waldorf Schools. Google founders Sergey Brin and Larry Page went to no-tech Montessori Schools, as did Amazon creator Jeff Bezos and Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales.

Many parents intuitively understand that ubiquitous glowing screens are having a negative effect on kids. We see the aggressive temper tantrums when the devices are taken away and the wandering attention spans when children are not perpetually stimulated by their hyper-arousing devices. Worse, we see children who become bored, apathetic, uninteresting and uninterested when not plugged in.

But it’s even worse than we think.

Related:

Video games are more addictive than ever. This is what happens when kids can’t turn them off.

Posted in Collapse, Health, Technology

[&&]{**}[##]

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TLqHIrxSJZY 

[&&]{**}[##]

Presence-Based Coaching

Copyright 2008 by Douglas K. Silsbee.

All rights reserved.

Published by Jossey-Bass

A Wiley Imprint

989 Market Street, San Francisco, CA 94103-1741—www.josseybass.com

Presence-Based Coaching offers coaches a hands-on resource for developing the capacities and skills needed to be reliably present in all situations, and shows how to let go of habitual –and often ineffective–ways of responding. As author and leadership expert Doug Silsbee explains, once a coach has mastered the inner moves of directing their own attention, they can work to develop the same capability in their clients. The ability of a coach to facilitate lasting, sustainable development in leaders rests on the presence a coach offers to the coach-client relationship.

Cultivating Self-Generative Leaders Through Mind, Body and Heart

Chapter 2 pdf: PBC-Ch-2

The full book is available here:

http://www.alibris.com/Presence-Based-Coaching-Cultivating-Self-Generative-Leaders-Through-Mind-Body-and-Heart-Doug-Silsbee/book/28448270 

Silsbee’s web site: 

http://presencebasedcoaching.com/404-2/ 

See also: 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gYhASLxW6tQ (2:32)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WOBVTMiTEeM (9:42)

The Mindful Coach: Seven Roles for Helping People Grow

https://www.abebooks.com/book-search/author/douglas-k-silsbee/ 

[&&]{**}[##]

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nntOYUODSV0 

[&&]{**}[##]

http://www.the-reel-mccoy.com/movies/2003/images/Timeline2.jpg 

I am presently reading Michael Crichton’s novel Timeline; my wife suggested it because we’d previously watched an indie movie about time travel. I’ll have lots more riffs off of this novel in the future, but one thing that stayed snagged in my mind was the scene of the preparation for the momentous flight from a modern-day high-tech company in the New Mexico desert back to a spot on the Dordogne River in medieval France.

The support staff, operating like a squad prepping astronauts, squirted an organic polymer into the ears of the time traveler so that, after the biodegradable stuff hardened, some other technican could drill it out to implant some electronics.

In Crichton’s tale, at the landing site in 1357, they speak only some strange variants of Old English, Occcitan and Middle French.  But the ear piece, aside from having a built-in microphone, translated those old lost languages for the people that fell back 750 years ….

 

http://store.storeimages.cdn-apple.com/4974/as-images.apple.com/is/image/AppleInc/aos/published/images/a/ir/air/pod/air-pod-pods-201609?wid=139&hei=279&fmt=png-alpha&qlt=95&.v=1473705350589

Today, of course, we have all manner of technical goodies that you can put into your ear, clip onto your ear, slip onto your wrist, or slide into your back pocket.  You can dial up someone at any location on the earth from right where you sit (or stand, or walk, or sit). Smart phones are getting mighty sophisticated; I’m sure they can translate for you at some level, though not as well as in Crichton’s fertile imagination. The age of the super-empowered individual is upon us. I don’t know what Thiel, Cook et al have in store (pardon the pun) for the near future, but I’m sure it’s exciting.

Our inventions are wont to be pretty toys, which distract our attention from serious things. They are but improved means to an unimproved end,… We are in great haste to construct a magnetic telegraph from Maine to Texas; but Maine and Texas, it may be, have nothing important to communicate.

http://www.bartleby.com/73/1540.html 

 

So it is with a concern about and a focus on our ability to communicate clearly with one another that I thought the mythical or prototypical electronics in Crichton’s fictional polymer earpiece might be tweaked or upgraded to translate for us when we found ourselves suddenly dropped into conversations at work, at home, when we’re out socially, when our conversational exchanges seemed to be between two people from different centuries, planets, cultures or simply experiences and mindsets.

You know the times.

They occur when people are being passive-aggressive, when they are being sarcastic but forgot to give you the emoji hand-signal, when they became obtuse and started to run on endlessly, when they took a left turn and simply lost you, when they used some local dialogue like “Valley Girl”, or when — quite simply, and without having to be harsh or demeaning of anyone else — the two of you can’t seem to be in the same chapter, let alone on the same page.

Perhaps the other party has difficulty concentrating, is overworked, their mind is elsewhere, or there’s too much technology in the way (PDA’s, texting, TV, interruptions, distractions).  Perhaps they (or you) are anxious, and there’s some underlying medical or psychological reason you have to learn to deal with or accept, or at least navigate gently through or around. Word-finding difficulties are common, as are momentary lapses in memory. Sometimes this can be awkward. Perhaps the subject is too damn difficult for one of you to address. Maybe there’s a combative atmosphere, or not enough respect present.  Maybe one of you is thwarting dialogue by lying, threatening, stonewalling, crying, shouting, going silent, or becoming accusatory, or lapsing into silence, or taking offense.

You’ve had these moments, I’m sure.

http://i2.cdn.turner.com/money/dam/assets/161214150902-trump-tech-summit-meeting-780×439.jpg

But relax…  I’m sure if the high-tech world has already begin to work on robotic sex devices that look like celebrities, all those people at Trump’s recent summit will soon have software for your earpiece that, in addition to translation, will function as conversational coaches.

They’re removeable and biodegradable, so if you have someone you simply don’t want to communicate with at all, you can just take them out and throw them away.

[&&]{**}[##]

Celebrity sex robots could thrust human intercourse aside, experts predict 

https://www.rt.com/uk/370985-celebrity-sex-robot-special/ 

“… “It could be that we are so busy with our lives, we are so embedded in our technological narrative that the idea of engaging in long-distance sex and robot sex is actually a natural process in our evolutionary cycle,” Dr. Trudy Barber from Portsmouth University said at the International Congress of Love and Sex with Robotics on Monday.

The scientist, who is a leading figure in the study of technology’s impact on our sexuality, believes that machines will help us cherish “the real thing” and make our “real-time relationships more valuable and exciting.”

Robots will become an “extra human race” and help humans explore “our sexual pallet,” she added…..”

[Ed.: You may want to do it on a pallet with a robot, but be careful of the splinters. As for palate, you can buy reverse-engineered human pheromones or fruity lubricants in the back of “respectable” magazines. Or maybe you should just invite your potential mate to a smorgasbord.

About Kim Kardashian, Ryan Gosling and Scarlett Johansson…, no thanks.]

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-7KhB7uJ_TE 

presence

presence

the 2-hour movie “Sirius”: 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5C_-HLD21hA 

I commend it to you. 

[&&]{**}[##]

http://www.siriusdisclosure.com 

[&&]{**}[##]

Hubble Reveals Observable Universe Contains 10 Times More Galaxies Than Previously Thought

October 13th, 2016 by Kevin

Via: NASA:

The universe suddenly looks a lot more crowded, thanks to a deep-sky census assembled from surveys taken by NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope and other observatories.

Astronomers came to the surprising conclusion that there are at least 10 times more galaxies in the observable universe than previously thought.

In analyzing the data, a team led by Christopher Conselice of the University of Nottingham, U.K., found that 10 times as many galaxies were packed into a given volume of space in the early universe than found today. Most of these galaxies were relatively small and faint, with masses similar to those of the satellite galaxies surrounding the Milky Way. As they merged to form larger galaxies the population density of galaxies in space dwindled. This means that galaxies are not evenly distributed throughout the universe’s history, the research team reports in a paper to be published in The Astrophysical Journal.

[&&]{**}[##]

October 14-16, 2016 — Assange doesn’t need Russia for hacking, he’s part of a global hacker network 

(in: WMR GENERAL ARCHIVES October 2016) 

Oct 14, 2016

Clapper, Brennan, and NSA chief Mike Rogers are blaming Russia for the computer hacking when they know it’s being carried out by independent hackers looking for ET material.

[requires inexpensive subscription]

[&&]{**}[##]

“Scientists Plan to Create ‘Asgardia’ Nation State in Space”

October 13th, 2016 by Kevin

Via: BBC:

A group of scientists is launching what they say will be a new pacifist nation-state in space.

Asgardia “will become a place in orbit which is truly ‘no man’s land’,” its website says.

The new “nation” aims to launch its first satellite late next year and hopes to one day be recognised by the UN.

But some experts have cast doubt on the viability of the plan, given international law prohibits national sovereignty claims in outer space.

“Citizens” of Asgardia, who will be scrutinised before admission, will eventually obtain passports, says Lena de Winne, a senior member of the project team who worked for the European Space Agency for 15 years.

“Clearly it’s difficult to wrap your head around the concept [of] how can you be a citizen of something you cannot put your foot on,” she told the BBC.

“But I’m a citizen of the Netherlands and I’m now in Paris… There is nothing unusual about it if you are a citizen of a land where you don’t live and where you don’t go.”

The project is being directed by the Vienna-based Aerospace International Research Center, a private company founded by Russian scientist and businessman Dr Igor Ashurbeiyli.

He joked to reporters in Paris at an event announcing the project that he would not be surprised if the media labelled him a “crazy Russian rocket scientist” talking “utter nonsense”.

Its website says the new nation, the name of which derives from a city in the sky in Norse mythology, “will offer an independent platform free from the constraint of a land-based country’s laws”.

The group says it will open up new opportunities in space for commerce, science and “peoples of all countries on earth”.

[Ed.: Dr Ashurbeiyli says he wants to create a “new judicial reality in space”.]

[&&]{**}[##]

http://www.siriusdisclosure.com/evidence/ce-5-photos-and-videos/ 

[&&]{**}[##]

BEST AVAILABLE EVIDENCE – DOCUMENTS

http://www.siriusdisclosure.com/evidence/bae-documents/ 

[&&]{**}[##]

Daniel Liszt welcomes back Geoengineering Author Elana Freeland to preview her new research set for release in 2017 on the massive Multi Level Surveillance Project called ‘The Space Fence.’ 

Early Development of SDI Technology

The Space Fence was originally the brainchild of the Reagan era during the craze to build the Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI) a space based weapons defense program ostensibly designed to protect the US from incoming Russian nuclear missiles. It has been established that this early version of the Space Fence may have actually been created to keep an eye on unusual UFO developments in space.

HAARP Ionization of the Atmosphere & Nano Particles

After abandoning SDI on paper, covert forces inside the National Security State continued to develop various uses for the space deployed technology. Realizing their new efforts of achieving a global domination through space surveillance on Earth could not be totally successful, they undertook to expand the ionization of the atmosphere which gives them the ability to implant tiny nano particles into the human body. These nano sensors can penetrate the blood brain barrier to activate wireless signals that can be remotely monitored and controlled. Human beings in effect would become walking cell towers that microwave signals could be beamed at and penetrated to automatically send back revealing data.

Planetary Lockdown

The ultimate purpose behind this decades long project can not be fully known, but according to Elana’s research we can deduce that its main goal is a Full Planetary Lockdown intended to centralize and control the full spectrum of activity on planet Earth, including human behavior, geopolitical events, weather conditions, earthquake activity and the creation of a manipulated reality within a gigantic artificial intelligence grid.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g0wPQ5VH_to&feature=youtu.be 

[&&]{**}[##]

https://static1.squarespace.com/static/54909824e4b096dd524666e5/t/56b0ef744c2f853cbf6c2d5a/1454436216700/ 

“Puppetry has everything. It combines sculpture and sewing and painting and performance and music and symbolism.”

The link is from a Boston Globe article but I actually became aware of Boston’s Free Puppet Library through a recent edition of WCVB-TV’s show Chronicle.

This small place with huge creativity is  a wonderful place for those who feel the need to try on being someone else for a while. [I’ve been carrying this quote  around since I was in the ninth grade.]

[&&]{**}[##]

I am currently re-reading The Body Silent. I stumbled across the book at a used book sale at a library I used to frequent before and after my hemiplegic motor stroke.  I got up out of the rehab bed and the wheelchair and, at one point, returned to a healthy q.o.d. one-hour intense circuit of treadmill, bike and Keiser machine, but atrial fibrillation reared its ugly head again, necessitating more intense medical treatment, enforced bed rest, and post-operative deconditioning, putting me right back into a state of near-immobility from which I have recovered yet again. My situation was not closely analgous with that of the author, a Columbia professor of anthropoology who wrote a stunning book at the 360 degrees of implications of what it means to be disabled in this world.  It was an eye-opener when I first read it, and it’s still informing me. It goes onto the shelf along with all those other books devoted to the unity of body, mind and spirit.

[&&]{**}[##]

Long-term readers probably know how I am about aikido… that I can no longer get myself onto the mat, but that I appreciate the discipline now even more as a metaphor for how one conducts oneself in life, in relationships, and in society.

YouTube put this in my path as a sugggestion for me, and I am going to put it in your path as a suggestion for you and everyone else.

Aikido in Three Easy Lessons (11 mins.)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DxyMZtA452k#t=119.26072819 

[&&]{**}[##]

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cpPSBzGEklE

shokunin

shokunin

The term Shokunin Kishitsu came to my attention

courtesy of the people at Holstee.com who,

in an approach that resonates with

my examination of excellence, magic, leadership and performance,

are all about mindfulness through art, words and action.  

 

As an amateur photographer and apprentice magician, I had to learn more about this phrase, and this blog entry is a record of that short inquiry. 

 

[&&]{**}[##]

May 09, 2015

Shokunin Kishitsu & The five elements of true mastery

Last November I dined in Tokyo with a friend who was here in Japan on business from California. My friend is the CEO of a multi-billion dollar tech company with offices worldwide, including in Japan. He’s someone I greatly admire and look up to for advice, wisdom, and inspiration. He’s a powerful leader, a successful business person, and a nice guy to boot. So when he said that he was absolutely shocked that I had not seen the film Jiro Dreams of Sushi, I felt ashamed of my failing and placed an order for the DVD immediately on Amazon. “I can’t believe you have not seen this movie!” he said. “I must have seen it 5-6 times by now and there’s always something to learn.” Here it is a few months later and in that time I too have seen the movie 5-6 times. My friend was right, there are many valuable lessons in this documentary. I recommend the movie to anyone who is interested in a beautiful visual narrative that is a mix of innovation insights and inspiration.

Shokunin Kishitsu

Shokunin kishitsu (職人気質) translates roughly as the “craftsman spirit.” The movie, in spite of its title, is not about sushi, it’s really about how to be a master shokunin, how to become truly great as a master craftsman. Yes, if you like sushi—and beautiful cinematography of sushi—then you’ll not be disappointed. But even if you have zero interest in sushi, you will be motivated and inspired by this film. The film is not perfect, of course. For example, the narrative could use more objectivity and a more critical eye. There are surely more downsides to Jiro’s approach (not to mention the issue of over fishing which is touched only very superficially). Yet, on the whole, it’s a wonderful documentary. No matter your job or your dreams, there may be a valuable lesson or two in this gem of a film that will help you in your pursuit of mastery. Checkout the trailer below for the feel of the film.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q78xvcnmIMw

Five elements of Mastery

There are many lessons from the film, but I will focus here on five main points that the film makes early on. Food critic Masuhiro Yamamoto speaks of what makes Jiro a true master at his art. “He sets the standard for self-discipline,” Yamamoto says. “He is always looking ahead. He’s never satisfied with his work. He’s always trying to find ways to make the sushi better, or to improve his skills. Even now, that’s what he thinks about all day, every day.”

What does any of these points below have to do with presentation? Well, public speaking, including presentation given with the aid of multimedia, is an art. It may be a big aspect of your life and career, or it may play a very minor role. But the art of presentation, and the art of communication in general, is something worthy of an obsessive pursuit of excellence. No matter how good you are today, you can get better.

Below are the five attributes, according to Yamamoto, that are found in any great chef. Think about how you—or your team—can apply these to your own work (art).

1. Majime (真面目). A true master is serious about the art. He or she strives for the highest level possible always. The commitment to hard work is strong. The level of dedication is constant. As Jiro’s older son says in the film, “We’re not trying to be exclusive or elite. The techniques we use are no big secret. It’s just about making an effort and repeating the same thing every day.” Their approach may be simple but their dedication and execution is what sets them apart.

2. Kojoshin (向上心). Always aspire to improve oneself and one’s work. There is an old Zen adage that says once you think you have arrived, you have already begun your descent. One must never think they “have arrived.” One of the shokunin at the fish market touches on this theme in the film while searching for the perfect fish. “…Just when you think you know it all, you realize that you’re just fooling yourself,” he says. One must always try to improve. “I do the same thing over and over, improving bit by bit, says Jiro. “There is always a yearning to achieve more.”

3. Seiketsukan (清潔感). Cleanliness, freshness. “If the restaurant doesn’t feel clean, the food isn’t going to taste good,” Yamamoto says. One can not prepare and perform well if the environment is cluttered, messy, or dirty. Some people say that a disorganized work space is liberating. I am not in that camp. For me at least, a dirty, cluttered office decreases my creativity and increases my anxiety. I am not a neat freak by any means, but when my office is cluttered, my mind is cluttered too (and often vice versa). This article touches on this issue outside the kitchen (A Tidy Office Space is the Key to Creative Thinking.) [Ed.: This is related to mise-en-place.]

4. Ganko (頑固). Stubbornness, obstinacy. The fourth attribute is…Impatience, Yamamoto says. “They are better leaders than collaborators. They’re stubborn and insist on having it their way.” Jiro is an individualist in pursuit of excellence rather than a team player in search of consensus. This does not mean he does not rely on his team or listen to them, but his team is hand picked and trained by him. In the end it is his vision and his responsibility.

5. Jyonetsu (情熱). Passion, enthusiasm. From the very first moments of the film: “Once you decide on your occupation…you must immerse yourself in your work. You have to fall in love with your work. Never complain about your job. You must dedicate your life to mastering your skill. That’s the secret of success…and is the key to being regarded honorably.” No passion, no art.

Your work, your art

The spirit of the shokunin is the pursuit of perfection. The pursuit is hard and the journey long, never ending in fact. But you love what you do in spite of the hardships. The work is not at all about the money. “Shokunin try to get the highest quality fish and apply their technique to it,” Jiro’s oldest son says. “We don’t care about money. All I want to do is make better sushi.”

http://www.presentationzen.com/.a/6a00d83451b64669e201b8d110fffc970c-150wi

Remember that the shokunin lessons here are not only for chefs or artists such as painters, musicians, dancers, etc. In the book Linchpin: Are You Indispensable? famed business guru Seth Godin makes the case that many dedicated professionals are doing art: “Art isn’t only a painting. Art is anything that’s creative, passionate, and personal. And great art resonates with the viewer, not only with the creator.” An artist, says Godin, “is someone who uses bravery, insight, creativity, and boldness to challenge the status quo. And an artists takes it personally.” You must throw yourself into it, suggest, Godin, “Art is a personal act of courage, something one human does that creates change in another.”

“I’ll continue to climb, trying to reach the top…but no one knows where the top is.” — Jiro Ono

The final few lines from the film Jiro Dreams of Sushi sum up the lessons from the master shokunin.

Always…

look ahead and above yourself.

Always try…

to improve on yourself.

Always strive to elevate your craft.

That’s what he taught me.

http://www.presentationzen.com/presentationzen/2015/05/the-five-secrets-to-mastery.html 

[&&]{**}[##]

 The core thematic statement in the introduction to “Summon The Magic”, from Chuang-Tzu, by way of Dorothea Dooling:

Once there was a master craftsman who made such beautiful things out of wood that the King demanded to know the secret of his art.

“Your Highness”, said the carpenter, “There is no secret.

But there is something. This is how I begin:

When I am about to make a table, I first collect my energies and bring my mind to absolute quietness. I become oblivious of any reward to be gained or any fame to be acquired. When I am free from the influences of all such outer considerations, I can listen to the inner voice which tells me clearly what I have to do.

When my skill is thus concentrated, I take up my ax; I make sure that it is perfectly sharp, that it fits my hand and swings with my arm. Then I enter the forest.

I look for the right tree, the tree that is waiting to become my table. And when I find it, I ask “What have I for you, and what have you for me?’ Then I cut down the tree and set to work. I remember how my masters taught me to bring my skill and my thought into relation with the natural qualities of the wood.”

The King said, “When the table is finished, it has a magical effect upon me; I cannot treat it as I would any other table. What is the nature of this magic?

“Your Majesty”, said the carpenter, “what you call magic comes only from what I have already told you.”

In A Way of Working, ed. E.D. Dooling. Anchor Books, 1979, from the original by Chuang-Tzu.

[&&]{**}[##]

American Shokunin (7:22)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NfdGGTb5_Ts 

[&&]{**}[##]

“… creativity comes down to showing up every day and practicing your craft. Creating a space for the magic to happen where discipline, skill and passion all come together in a single moment.…”

[&&]

“There is nothing noble in being superior to your fellow man; true nobility is being superior to your former self.” 

Ernest Hemingway

http://fundydesigner.com/tip-%E2%80%A2-photography-lessons-from-a-master-sushi-chef/ 

[&&]{**}[##]

Source of featured image at the top:

http://www.ettinger.co.uk/about-us/heritage/craftsmanship 

Scrolling through a search of Google Images using the search word “craftmanship” makes it seem as though the concept, the word, is about products, tools, fine-finger dexterity and the like.  

Many fine things, works of arts, and much much more come from applied craftsmanship. 

But what about craftsmanship of the mind, the heart, the spirit?

There’s a quote you can find in which a photographer talks about seeing things others don’t see.

What about craftsmanship within the fields of cultural, social, political and spiritual leadership?

high cultural drama

a moment of high cultural drama

{Top image from Rafael Lavenère.} http://www.feterie.com/blog/2010/11/04/inspiration-moment-point-the-way/

I couldn’t help but think (or hope), after watching  Rebekah Roth connect a few more dots, that we may yet reach a moment of high cultural drama and import.  Well, okay, it’ll take a little while while a few more people realize the import of what she has discovered, and it would be helpful if they and the MSM woke up to the import of this story from Down Under.  

On the local level I’ve been able to apologize to my wife for putting her in the broader class we all call sheeple. She knows; she just doesn’t talk about it. 

But if a larger and larger group of people come to knowledge and awareness rapidly enough, we are going to have a sea change. We are going to have the kinds of mass activism discussed by Ray Raphael when he described large numbers of people armed with nothing more than staves massed outside governmental offices while a selected small group of spokespeople seek audience and quietly demand the resignations of the occupants. 

It has been said that the massed perps, using circles, councils, secret societies and symbolic communication, are preparing for such a confrontation and are moving as rapidly as they can without drawing attention to themselves to secure their flight to freedom or their safety behind  barriers of armed protectors. They deny you the right to own a simple weapon; they can buy armored Range Rovers and a squad of special operatives. That we live in a police state that has been heavily militarized for future action against the people can no longer be denied. There is some fear or trepidation that the coming weeks, focused in part on a convergence of world leaders in The Big Apple, signals some major event. [Some are focused on the Pope.] 

But the NYPD will be ready, 

having run a 40-agency tabletop exercise.

 

“Here we go again” may resonate because these people have demonstrated the repeated use of strategic templates, perhaps built upon their own knowledge of  the tools they command.

It is also reminiscement of the penultimate scene of a movie about official involvement in crime and its cover-up in which people came together after hearing the urgent signals of a bell.

 

 

A Wave of Discontent Is Heading Toward Washington 

A new ABC News/Washington Post poll shows that voters are deeply distrustful of politicians and believe that the current political system is dysfunctional.

A whopping 72 percent feel that people in politics can’t be trusted and nearly half of them (48 percent) said they “strongly” feel that way. Republicans in particular want to see an outsider fix the nation’s problems and that is reflected in the latest GOP presidential poll, which has non-politicians Donald Trump (33 percent) and Ben Carson (20 percent) leading the pack by a wide margin. As the first insider, Jeb Bush comes in third at 8 percent.

Overall, 64 percent of voters think the current system is not functional but they prefer it to be patched up (76 percent) instead of tearing it down and starting over (21 percent).

http://whowhatwhy.org/2015/09/15/editors-picks-for-sept-15-2/

 

People are apparently comfortable with a representative democracy, or republic, so long as the leadership represents the people. When the leadership acts on their own financial interests, those of a foreign country, those of a system of usurious banking, or acts in ways that are blatantly and openly murderous, destructive and … well, one might use the word evil, they might act in some way that says enough

But the police will be ready with something like a Strategic Response Group

Do the people or the press or the alternative media have anything like a strategic response capability? 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X94XhXRzU5A 

magic alphabet untwisted

Now that we’ve gotten the magic alphabet untwisted, we can move on.

The e-book entitled “Summon The Magic: How To Use Your Mind….” now sits poised to move into the 12th chapter “On Mentors, Coaches and Warriors”, and then the 13th chapter “On Teams”.

 

Tab L (Mentors, Coaches & Warriors)  

 

  • This chapter focuses on what may be, for some of you, your first board meeting as the new CEO.
  • If you’ve had difficulty asking for help, it will provide some simple tools that will help you.
  • It will teach you how to look for your teacher, or mentor, and how to determine which ones are the right ones.
  • It will teach you how to create a functional and effective circle of supportive people.
  • It will dissect and analyze what goes on in coaching, and you’ll be able to see that from the perspectives of the coachee or client (you) and the coach or mentor.

“Information embedded in an emotional context seems to stimulate neural circuitry more powerfully than information presented neutrally. A smile, good eye contact, touch, and the rhythm, tone, pacing, melody and vibration of voice…, all play a role in effective instruction.” 

 

  • Using an athletic model, Page 21 breaks down and charts graphically the process of assessment.
  • There’s a discusion of feedback loops within the coaching interaction.
  • Speech, voice and communications skills in coaching are discused.
  • The coachee’s responses are broken down into four categories.
  • The role of confrontation and criticism are reviewed.
  • One of the things that this chapter will do is to introduce you to such books as How To Be, Do, or Have Anything: A Practical Guide to Creative Empowerment.
  • And the chapter acts as a springboard as the overall look at excellence moves from a focus on the individual to a focus on the team, or organization, or larger grouping.

 

The Coach is also a  (13 other roles)

 

The 13th chapter, then, is “On Teams”.

Tab M (On Teams)

“In a rapidly-changing environment, the strengths of many individuals must be combined into a cohesive and synchronized effort.

  • The idea of shared experiential goals is discussed, as well as team leadership and the roles of communications, learning and mindfulness.
  • The dynamics or changes in the team and their relationship to team development are discussed.

 

“The rate at which a team learns may become it’s only sustainable advantage.”

  • There is an overview of the Tuckman model of “forming, storming, norming, and performing”.

Tuckman Model

https://danielseet.files.wordpress.com/2008/12/edisons-project-team-development-curve.jpg

  • I added my own text and graphic expression of team chemistry, upgraded here:

Team Chemistry pdf copy

  • There is an introduction to the concept of organizational learning.
  • There are five questions on page 15 you ought to ask yourself (and your team) right now.
  • There is material on team spirit, team dynamics, team cohesion, team bonding, and team harmony.
  • There’s a section on the role of non-verbal communication in team interaction, and another on team exercises in concentration and movement.
  • There’s two pages (27 and 28) on the development of a shared vision.
  • There is an 18-point plan for empowering your team.

 

“If people don’t have their own vision, all they can do is “sign up” for someone else’s. The result is compliance, never commitment.”

 

I like the section on page 31 about getting individuals on a team to express a quality about the thing that you need to work on. This moves toward team learning and team alignment.

 

There’s a lot more.  Have fun.

Je Ne Sais Quoi #7

Je Ne Sais Quoi Day Seven

Richard Strozzi Heckler, Ph.D. 


Richard Strozzi-Heckler, Ph.D. is founder of the Strozzi work and of Strozzi Institute. A nationally known speaker, coach and consultant on leadership and mastery, he has spent four decades researching, developing, and teaching the practical application of Somatics (the unity of language, action, emotions, and meaning) to business leaders, executive managers and teams from Fortune 500 companies, NGOs, technology start-ups, non-profits, the U.S. government and military.

Richard is the author of eight books, including The Art of Somatic Coaching,The Leadership Dojo, In Search of the Warrior Spirit, The Anatomy of Change, Holding the Center, Being Human at Work, The Mind/Body Interface, and Aikido and the New Warrior. [I’ve read and recommend all of them.] His articles have appeared in Esquire, East West Journal, The Whole Earth Review, and numerous other publications. In October 2000, a Wall Street Journal cover story featured the groundbreaking leadership program developed by Richard for the United States Marine Corps.

He was named one of the Top 50 Executive Coaches in The Art and Practice of Leadership Coaching, Jossey-Bass, 2004 and Profiles in Coaching, Linkage Publications, 2003. He is also the Honorary President of the Peruvian Coaching Association. He is the co-founder of the Mideast Aikido Project (MAP), which brings together Palestinians and Israelis through the practice of Aikido.

From 2002 to 2007 he was an advisor to NATO and the Supreme Allied Commander of Europe (SACEUR) General Jim Jones, who is now the National Security Advisor.

Richard has a Ph.D. in Psychology and is a sixth degree black belt in the martial art of Aikido. He also holds ranks in Judo, Jujitsu, and Capoeira.

Richard has taught at the University of Chicago, Harvard University, Sonoma State University, Esalen Institute, Lone Mountain College, Naropa Institute, and the University of Munich. Richard was the 2009 William Dickson Leader-in-Residence for the Ukleja Center for Ethical Leadership at California State University, Long Beach.

http://www.strozziinstitute.com/about/faculty 

 

http://www.strozziinstitute.com/ 

https://www.youtube.com/user/StrozziInstitute   [YouTube channel]

****

Are You Centered? Are You Grounded?  

(from In Search of the Warrior Spirit)

The aikido master says, “You will learn how to give up your ground without giving up your center.”

The student says “What’s the difference?”

The master says “Center is the connection with your own sense of personal power. Ground is extending that power into the environment.”

The student says, “Give me an example.”

The master says, “Imagine yourself standing on a well-polished marble floor and you have wool sweat socks on. You can be centered, but you cannot be too well grounded. If you take off the sweat socks, you can ground yourself.”

We can learn to give up our ground while still keeping our center, our own sense of personal power and choice.  We can learn to move in harmonious relationship to any incoming energy, any difficult situation, without giving up who we are.

****

Breakout:

http://theleadershipdojo.com/ 

http://theleadershipdojo.com/excerpts.html  [13 pages]

http://theleadershipdojo.com/videos.html !!

****

Breakout:

Five Minutes on Practice and Transformation 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZO4fh5Kp2e4 

****

Attention in the Body 

(from The Anatomy of Change)

Attention is a primary ingredient in embodiment and, at the same time, the connecting thread throughout our learning and development. When we are paying attention to what we are doing, we are both learning and encouraging learning. Our attention is the rudder that guides us through the world. It gives us direction, and it connects us to the current of energy that moves us. The act of paying attention creates a quality of awakening that expands us beyond the usual dreams. Cultivating this awareness enriches our lives because  it tells us who we are and how we are.

In order to embody and use our self as a source of learning, it is necessary to identify with the life of the body. To live in our body and be aware of what we feel, touch, taste, hear, breathe, see and think, it is necessary to shift our attention

from analyzing and remembering to feeling and sensing. Bringing attention to our body vitalizes and empowers our actions. Without it, our life is mechanical; we go through the motions but are not with our self in a truly meaningful way. We can correctly form our arms around another for a hug, for example, but if we are not paying attention, it is only a shadow of the kind of warmth that can be communicated.  Our attention is at work all of the time, probing into the world and back into ourselves. It is an innate skill; nothing needs to be invented. What we need to do, however, is to come into direct contact with our attention so that we can learn to use it to manifest meaning and wholeness.

The first principle of attention is that it is flexible and can be directed.   It is attention that imbues the sensory organs with presence and vitality. With attention on your fingers and hands as your read a book, information will come to you about the weight of the book, the texture of the paper, the pressure of your fingers. You can direct your attention to the sounds in this room, or the next room, and a whole new set of information will come to you. Yet your hands

remain holding the book. Now take your attention to your memory of the last meal you ate. As your attention probes your memory, highlights of that last meal will appear, perhaps woven with tactile and taste sensations and emotions about those with whom you shared. The experience of holding the book remains. The sounds of the room remain, but now we are focused on something else. This power of

directing one’s attention is the key to embodying ourselves. By integrating this capacity, we have a way of bringing ourselves back to the experience of the life of the body and of anchoring ourselves in the present moment.

The second principle is that attention can vitalize or devitalize a situation. This is because it magnetizes energy. Where we place our attention, energy will follow.  By turning the attention to a specific bodily function, we can gather information about that function and also initiate a change in that area and ultimately in our behavior.  For example, if your attention concentrates on an ache or pain, you will find that it is not static and unchanging, but dynamic and moving, and the power of your attention can become a key factor in working with and lessening the pain.  We can gain a better understanding of the numerous signals our body transmits concerning health and well-being.

The organ of attention has enormous possibilities for both healing and learning. If we place our attention on that which is life-giving and creative, that part of us will be nourished.  If we place our attention on negativity, that will be cultivated.  Sit comfortably with your eyes open and let your attention gaze out the window. Now bring your attention to the window frame, then to an object near you, then to your feet on the floor, now to the rhythm of your breath, now deep inside you to your core. As you shift attention, everything remains, but the power of attention illuminated and energized each one in turn. Everything exists at the same time, but our attention brings them into the foreground of our experience. We can illuminate our embodied states as well. Paying attention to what we are doing provides a spaciousness that allows self-inquiry to take place. We can literally open ourselves to participate in something that is larger that the boundaries we are normally accustomed to.

Through an ongoing personal discipline and practice, we can begin to contact an intelligence that is deep enough to be the source of our learning and precise enough to show us how to learn. This awareness is the basis for learning and transformation.   When we place our attention in our body, we can begin to connect to our energy which informs us of our direction and meaning in life. If we respond from that energy, we are responding from that part of ourselves that is least conditioned. If we act from our energy, and not from our ideas, social images, or what others expect, we feel enriched with genuine expression and life.

****

 The Body as a Functional Living Whole 

(from The Anatomy of Change)

Somatics, a word derived from Greek, defines the body as a functional, living whole rather than as a mechanical structure. There is no split between the mind and the body; the soma as a unified expression of all that we think, feel, perceive and express.  In the art and science of somatics, we are encouraged to become the source of our information by participating in our knowledge and self-discovery.

We become the source by contacting our body. In this way, we can bring to light the dimensions of gesture, stance, attitude, emotion, movement and that which is the foundation of all life: energy. This approach does not discount thoughts or thinking but integrates them with the how of our self.  How we really are, in action, attitude and the way we relate to others, is a basis for learning by experience.  If we embody our ideas and opinions, we can participate more deeply in who we are and who we may become; we have at our disposal the primary ingredient for learning: our self.  In whatever situation, the most difficult imaginable, the most delightful, the most boring, we have on 24-hour call what is necessary for making a decision, for taking a risk, for choosing and responding.

When we learn how to work with our excitement, an aspect of ourselves that is rich with information and creativity comes to the surface.

****

http://www.alibris.com/Holding-to-the-Center-Sanctuary-in-a-Time-of-Confusion-Richard-Heckler-Ph-D/book/2965215 

****

Breakout:

Staci Haines on Somatics (five minutes)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y2MD5v4_Pxw 

****

Breakout:

Jo Kata Aikido Demo (an outstanding 90 seconds)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ai9wb_UNXTA 

 

What the Practice of Jo Kata is Designed To Do

(another great 90 seconds)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T-fBUcCC7RU 

****

From Novice to Master 

(from In Search of the Warrior Spirit)

In the first level, the student plays without knowing what is happening.  He is lost in space.  He sees nothing.  Not only do the movements of his opponent seem to materialize by magic, but his own movements are beyond his control.

This stage is called Playing in the Dark.

Following this, the new student gains a foothold in the techniques and flow of movement; this is called Playing in the Water.

Then there is a mastering of technique in which the student demonstrates impeccable skill. Called Playing in the Light, this stage represents a shift from physical mastery to emotional control, an understanding of the philosophical elements of the art. This is the place where inner art is developed. This is also  the place where many hit a wall, lose motivation, or get stuck.

Some move to the fourth level, Playing with the Crystal Ball, where concerns about strengths, skills, speed and other physical aspects become less important to growth and the student begins trying to read the opponent’s mind and set himself in the right place at the right time.

After further work at this level, the last level Playing with the Mind is found, in which the opponent must do what your mind silently orders him to do. Such control has no other purpose than to help your opponent evolve.

****

Breakout:

Exercises for Jo Kata Practice (11 minutes)

to develop flexibility, strength and a centered presence

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=txvFBcqrmok 

The full 31 Jo Kata evolution (five minutes)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nDNG40i1Auc 

****

“For the second year in a row an early fall storm soaks us with an inch of rain, followed by a robust sun. The air is thick and damp and the windows in the dojo steam over as the heat of moving bodies transforms the space into a translucent glaze of moisture. Despite the focused heat my waning garden reminds me it is not spring, as does the thickening light and the Vs of geese that arrow south. Mice, voles, and Brewer’s sparrows scurry in the underbrush, amending their rhythms to imminent change. As I harvest the last of the tomatoes, lettuce, and squash I’m reminded of what seeds were planted in the spring, both in the receptive earth and in my psyche. If we stop and quiet ourselves there’s a transparent abundance in this turning toward winter. Heeding our fragile place in its unfolding we are inevitably led to gratefulness. I perform a deep bow to the fence posts, to the corn, to the stones, to the gophers that ate the melons, to the emptiness of mind, to Life.

Our body is precisely the medium of exchange with this field of awareness we call Life. The body is life, it is the interface with life, it’s the ground in which we participate with the air, the falling leaves, the smile of a grandchild, the doe and its fawn darting through the live oaks. In concert with other bodies- waving our limbs, sighing and laughing, shouting to the night sky, walking into a shared unknown – we co-author a story that can be told an infinite number of ways, a pluralism that is mysteriously One. Our sentience is not a body in seclusion; it is birthed by our direct encounters with the terror of the night as well as the delight of a fresh Roma tomato dribbling off our chin; and everything in between. Let’s not fall into the trap of thinking that our capacity for conscious reflection is the result of only partnering with our self, rather than with the world at large. 

Here’s a profoundly simple way of practicing that partnership: Align along your vertical line, extend through the crown of the head up towards the heavens and through the soles of the feet down to the earth. Now draw in a breath and let the vertebrae and rib cage swell while you both settle and straighten. Do this again, each time feel, and imagine, that the breath is connecting the world with your most inner places. Pull the breath from the outermost edge of the cosmos and feed it to your cells and let it expand your soul, and your skin. Notice how it is all tied together: breath, tissue, sensation, community, energy, self, the Mystery. Now say “Thank You” from this Unity.

Take It Easy, But Take It

Richard Strozzi-Heckler, Ph.D.

http://www.strozziinstitute.com/

Posted by realitymanifest at 12:31 PM

http://realitymanifest.blogspot.com/2011/10/richard-strozzi-hecklers-led-to.html 

****

Whenever there is work requiring strength or courage,

people ask

‘Are there no warriors around today?’

The warrior has been with us since man and woman first stood upright, not only protecting our hearths but expressing our highest values. A warrior is someone who is always striving for self-mastery, to improve himself and better serve his goals. Being a warrior doesn’t mean winning or succeeding. But it does mean putting your life on the line. It means risking and failing and risking again, as long as you live.

The intrinsic virtues of the warrior include commitment, service, courage, loyalty, comradeship – belonging to the entire human family. The imperishable code of the warrior over time includes the qualities of loyalty, intensity, impassioned, service (often expressed in the protection of others), calmness under fire, patience, strength of will, awareness of limitations, and self-mastery.

The modern warrior is grounded in a spiritual discipline and is at the same time committed to compassionate service in the world. In the traditions of both the East and the West, the warrior serves in a noble and necessary position in the overall well-being of society, but the intrinsic virtues of the warrior belong to the entire human family, in each human heart that hungers for a passionate and whole-hearted life, the calling to be tested, that part of us that seeks to be challenged to extend beyond ourselves. We long for the encounter that will ultimately empower us with dignity and honor.

There are certainly a legacy that distinguishes the warrior fro war. The sacred path of the warrior is part of an ancient moral tradition that includes the Indian warriors Krishna and Arjuna from the Bhagavad-Gita, Homer’s hero Odysseus who outwitted his opponents rather than slay them, and the post-16th-century Japanese Samurai who, in his finest hour, administered a peaceful government while still maintaining a personal discipline and integrity to not only the martial arts but also to the fine arts of calligraphy, flower arranging, and poetry.

In Search of the Warrior Spirit: Teaching Awareness Disciplines to the Green Berets, Richard Strozzi Heckler, North Atlantic Books, 1992.

****

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nDNG40i1Auc 

http://images.clipartpanda.com/taking-notes-clipart-take_notes.png 

Musical Interlude for Notes:

Equinox, John Coltrane

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5m2HN2y0yV8 (8:32)

Going Home   Mark Knopfler

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H2vCScBgf6s (5:01)

 

Tomorrow, day number eight, the last day, we cap off with an individual

whose credentials stretch across the diverse fields of

business trends forecasting, theatrical excellence, music education, authorship, and

creative engagement within the community. 

Je Ne Sais Quoi #2

 

Rosabeth Moss Kanter

http://sands.hbs.edu/photos/facstaff/Ent6486.jpg 

The author of Confidence: How Winning Streaks and Losing Streaks Begin & End, Dr. Kanter tweets

The best #leaders convene conversations & set the stage that enables others to develop solutions. ow.ly/n0O3G Nearly anyone can convene she says.”

 

She is chair and director of the Advanced Leadership Initiative, a University-wide faculty group aimed at deploying a leadership force of experienced leaders who can address challenging national and global problems in their next stage of life. The goal of the Advanced Leadership Fellowship is to prepare experienced leaders to transition from their primary income-earning years to community and public service for their next years of life. The Fellowship is designed to enhance and leverage the skills of already accomplished leaders for maximum impact on significant social problems, including those that affect health and welfare, children and the environment.

****

From the book  Confidence: How Winning Streaks and Losing Streaks Begin & End:

 

 

The Dynamics of Decline, Death Spirals and Loops of Doom  

Turf protection is clearly the enemy of change.  Secrecy and isolation, blame and avoidance, all accelerate the death spiral.  Time and energy get spent on self- protection instead of mutual problem-solving.  Invisible walls grow taller.  Informal communication decreases.  People feel trapped; some head for the exit.  The cycle becomes mired in learned helplessness; repeated failures to get out of a difficult situation teach people not even to try.  They settle for the timidity of mediocrity.  They sometimes leap for tantalizing short-run solutions that will only make the situation worse.

Acting from a weak position, they reinforce an ever-weakening position.  Promises of forthcoming superior performance only put more pressure on leaders and performers who then learn to hide bad news from each other.  With low aspirations and little innovation, with inflated hopes and metrics that have been tweaked for temporary advantage, everyone’s confidence is reduced.  When the results prove to be less than forecast, onlookers speak in discrediting tones, causing further decline in perceived value and the confidence of the team.

Individual choices, in which each person or group tried to exercise whatever power they felt they had, added up to a system that made all of them feel powerless — impossible to change, in a loop of doom.  Panic leads to quick fixes, and quick fixes in the face of losses undermine the long-term strategy and deflect attention from it.

The dynamics of decline are remarkably similar among sports teams and corporations.  The problems of distressed organizations are pathological patterns that are self-perpetuating perpetuating self-perpetuating and mutually reinforcing.

Decline is not a state… it is a trajectory.  Losing teams, distressed organizations, declining empires, and even depressed people often run downhill at an accelerating pace.  Common reactions to failure prevent success and make losing in the future more likely.  Unchecked cycles of decline can easily turn into death spirals.  Problems are exacerbated by responses that make them even harder to solve.  Secrecy, blame, isolation, avoidance, a lack of respect, and feelings of helplessness create a culture that makes the situation worse, and makes change seen impossible.

Decline stems not from a single factor, but from an accumulation of decisions, actions and commitments that become entangled in self-perpetuating system dynamics.  Once a cycle of decline is established, it is hard to simply call a halt, put on the brakes, and reverse direction.  The system has momentum.  Expectations have formed, and they can turn into a culture that perpetuates losing.

So how does losing become a habit?

If losses mount, pressure goes up — or the perception of pressure.  Stress makes it easier to panic.  Panic makes it easier to lose.  Losing increases neglect — letting facilities get run down, discipline deteriorate, and good manners disappear.  Signs of failure cause people to dislike and avoid one another, hide information, and disclaim responsibility — key elements of denial.  All this makes the cornerstones of confidence crumble.  People doubt themselves, feel they cannot count on others, and do not trust the system around them.  The climate of expectations turns negative, and everyone begins to feel powerless to change anything

Losing streaks begin in response to a sense of failure, and failure makes people out of control.  It is just one more step to a pervasive sense of powerlessness, and powerlessness erodes confidence.  When there are few resources or coping mechanisms for dealing with problems, people fall back on almost primitive, self-protective behavior.  There are nine pathologies that begin to unfold as an emotional and behavioral chain reaction:

  • Communication decreases.
  • Criticism and blame increase.
  • Respect to decreases.
  • Isolation increases.
  • Focus turns inward.
  • Rifts widen and inequities grow.
  • Initiative decreases.
  • Aspirations diminish.
  • Negativity spreads.

These behavioral tendencies are polar opposites of the characteristics that help winners win.  Powerlessness erodes the cornerstones of confidence, reducing the triad of accountability, collaboration, and initiative.  And, at the extreme, it can corrupt, if losers’ habits lead to acts of petty tyranny, selfishness, and a desire to harm others.

Understanding each of the losers’ temptations makes clear how to recognize the symptoms of decline, and why it is so important to avoid them.  If untreated, these responses can turn a few losses into a long losing streak, and modest decline into a death spiral.

Finding New Resources to Invest in Your Team 

The clue to beginning the process of renewing confidence is the confidence leaders show in the people who must work to deliver winning performance.

That confidence does not come from empty pep talks, but from tangible indications that someone cares enough to invest in those people and to empower them to take new actions.  Leaders show confidence in the people by finding the resources* to invest.  Building confidence in advance of victory requires a leap of faith — a belief that the sick system can recover, even when the situation is most dire.

Although sick systems might need surgeons who cut out deadwood and unnecessary expenditure, if that is all that happens, then losses are temporarily stemmed, but the system has not been led to a winning path.  The art of turnaround leadership is in knowing how to shed deadwood without killing the tree, to dig down and find root causes and make systemic changes, and to help the tree blossom.  That takes a healer.

*[While those resources might at times require money for new facilities, new equipment, etc., be careful not to fall into the trap set up for you by thinking these new trappings are where the process must start.  The least costly but often difficult resources that must be found include, first and foremost, time, energy, creativity, passion, honesty, character, and commitment.]

 

Breakout: There are a series of videos here at this link:

http://bigthink.com/experts/rosabethmosskanter

 

——v——

Choices, Choices, Choice 

Heads of sports teams, airlines, schools, manufacturing companies, media organizations, hospitals, religious denominations, and nations define a culture of winning or losing, success or failure, by the choices they make in their messages, personal examples, and formal programs:

* whether to make decisions in secret behind closed doors, or to use transparent processes that involve opened that debate and dialogue;

* whether to restrict the flow of information, or to expose facts and support abundant communication;

* whether to blame problems on enemies and sinister forces, or to seek solutions by taking actions under one’s own control;

* whether to act unilaterally, or to seek collaborators;

* whether to fuel partisan division, or stress collective goals that unite people;

* whether to underscore suspicion and mistrust of groups that are “different”, or to promote mutual respect and relationships;

* whether to feed desires for revenge, or to encourage initiatives for improvement;

* whether to concentrate resources at the center, in the hands of the elites, or to invest in numerous small wins in many places by many people;

* whether to use fear to justify decisions, or to emphasize sources of hope.

Which end of the scale a leader chooses sets the standards for negative or positive behavior, restricts or opens opportunities for actions, depresses energy or raises spirits, and influences how much people are willing to invest. Secrecy, blame, revenge, unilateral action, partisan division, and motivation by fear are, of course, the stuff of losing streaks. Sending messages (explicitly or implicitly) that those phenomena are acceptable, and exemplifying them in policy and practice, tilts the odds toward slipping into decline and losers’ habits. This limits the capacity to solve problems and erodes confidence at all levels, from self to system, internally and externally.

Leaders who guide winning streaks make a different set of choices, toward positive, inclusive, empowering actions that build confidence. By believing in other people, they make it possible for others to believe in them. Working together, they increase the likelihood of success, and of continuing to succeed.

From Confidence: How Winning Streaks and Losing Streaks Begin, Rosabeth Moss Kanter, Random House/Crown Business, NY, 2004. 

http://images.clipartpanda.com/taking-notes-clipart-take_notes.png

Musical Interlude for Notes:

Crossroads, Ahmad Jamal

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=naOtmf3vbeU (8:50)

 

http://www.bcsiteservice.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/Vacant-Brushed-Silver-Meeting-Room-Sign-With-Round-Corners.jpg

Julia Cameron

Cameron’s memoir Floor Sample details her descent into alcoholism and drug addiction, which induced blackouts, paranoia and psychosis.[3] In 1978, reaching a point in her life when writing and drinking could no longer coexist,[4] Cameron stopped the drugs and alcohol, and began teaching creative unblocking, eventually publishing the book based on her work: The Artist’s Way.[3] She states creativity is an authentic spiritual path.[2]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Julia_Cameron [includes complete list of her books including those in the extended “Artist’s Way series]

Other resources:

http://juliacameronlive.com (her web site)

http://bookpage.com/interview/how-the-artist-found-her-way#.VSAWxlz40TM 

http://www.artistswayatwork.com 

http://juliacameronlive.com/the-artists-way/ (video series requiring subscription)

****

Breakout (a blog with subscription available)

http://juliacameronlive.com/blog/ !!

****

I’ve worked at length with “The Artist’s Way”, which I owned along with “Walking in this World” (but they disappeared on me); I also had once started building a major exercise series based on her book “The Vein of Gold”.

She is a true resource, and her books are marvelous self-development tools that I recommend to anyone. In my case, they were the impetus for the development of an e-book, now in its umpteenth variation; my morning pages turned into blogging.

“The first prerequisite for education is a willingness to sacrifice your prejudice on the altar of your spiritual growth.”

****

The Artist’s Way: A Spiritual Path To Higher Creativity is a self-help book by American author Julia Cameron. The book was written to help people with artistic creative recovery, which teaches techniques and exercises to assist people in gaining self-confidence in harnessing their creative talents and skills. Correlation and emphasis is used by the author to show a connection between artistic creativity and a spiritual connection with God.[1][2][3][4]

The ideas in creative personal development outlined in the book, which were felt to be new at the time of the publication,[5] are said to have become a phenomenon and spawned into many meetups and support groups throughout the world. The group meetings are based on a 12 week creativity course designed for people to work through and gain Artistic inspiration, as outlined in the book. The program is focused on supporting relationships in removing artistic blocks and fostering confidence.[1][6]

Starting as a collection of tips and hints from different artists and authors, The Artist’s Way was collected into a single book and self published by Julia Cameron for maximizing the creativity and productivity of artists.[7]The book was originally titled, Healing the Artist Within, and was turned down by the William Morris literary agency, before being self-published. After the book began to sell widely, the title was then changed, when the book was published by Jeremy Tarcher (now The Penguin Group) in 1992.[5] The book went on to reach the Top 10 best seller list[8] and onto the list of the Top 100 Best Self-Help Books of All Time.[9] The book was eventually put into the “Self-Publishing Hall of Fame” after selling millions of copies worldwide.[7]

Cameron maintains throughout the book that creative inspiration is from and of a divine origin and influence, that artists seeking to enable creativity need to understand and believe in.“God is an artist. So are we. And we can cooperate with each other. Our creative dreams and longings do come from a divine source, not from the human ego.”[3][10]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Artist%27s_Way 

Musical Interlude for Notes:

Seven Days of Falling, EST

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vyk5kg-r9Fg (5:59)

Within You Without You, Beatle instrumental

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hb_0SLGP9ls (5:27)

 

Tomorrow: The master of the inner game of whatever game you’re not playing well. 

What can we do? (Part Two)

What can we do? (Part Two)

 

http://www.shalinibosbyshell.com/images/frame_empathy.jpg

 

Empathy:  When you are not you, but that which you wish to understand

For historians, empathizing means being able to see the world through other people’s eyes. Biographers “get into the minds of their subjects–their thoughts, emotions and even body feelings”. You’re beginning to understand someone you have come to know when you can accurately predict their next expression.

Kan Is a difficult-to-translate Japanese term meaning something akin to a combination of empathizing and kinesthetic thinking–becoming one with the music and the instrument producing it.  C.P.E. Bach argued that “a musician cannot move others unless he too was moved. He must feel all the emotions that he hopes to rise in his audience.” Dance, music and some athletic maneuvers must simulate an empathy within the bodies of onlookers, creating within them the desire to move. A choreographer must have empathy for his or her dancers, who are the raw material from which the dances made. The choreographer, wrote Doris Humphrey, “must have a high regard for their individuality, remember that they are not like himself, and bring all of his intelligence to bear on the problem of understanding them, physically, emotionally and psychologically. Many choreographic failures are due to an insensitivity to people”. Empathizing is “a key skill for the practice of any helping relationship”.

The entire philosophy of Zen Buddhism is inextricably bound up with the idea that a person must become one with the objects of meditation, to lose his or her sense of self in order to comprehend the otherness of things as if they were not other. Thus all of the arts associated with Zen–the landscapes, rock gardens, paintings, drawings, architecture, tea ceremonies and other rituals–require the ability to empathize with nature. Buck Branneman, the trainer who inspired the novel and movie The Horse Whisperer, uses the horse’s own language of subtle body movements and gestures. “There’s no secret to this”, he says. “I just know what we need to do in order for both of us to speak the same language and dance the dance.” Jane Goodall, who has worked with chimpanzees in the wild, notes that “subtle communication cues denoting slight changes in mood or attitude toward other chimpanzees are more readily detected once empathy has been established.” In A River Runs Through It, the story of 2 sons of a Presbyterian minister, all dedicated fly fisherman, the older son achieves a strong sense of the river, its eddies and currents, the environment in which the fish hides. He says “I’m pretty good with a rod, but I need 3 more years before I can think like a fish.” The younger son, a master fisherman, responds “But you’re the know how to think like a dead stone fly.” Thomas Eisner pioneered the study of the chemical defense and communications systems of insects, and would dream of talking to ants in Spanish. Once he dreamed he was an insect talking to insects and telling them that he had dreamed he was a human. Of the oldest and best preserved tricks in the hunter’s repertoire is to throw the skin of an animal he is caught over his own body in order to blend with his prey. To be successful, you must learn to act and think like that animal. What better way then to take on the role of the hunted, to imagine how the creature will respond? A hunt is a battle of wits, and the avid hunter soon develops a deep sense of respect for his prey.

The eminent philosopher Sir Karl Popper said “you should enter into your problem situation in such a way the almost become part of it.” Charles Ketterling, the long-term director of research at General Motors, would often reprimand engineers who got lost in complex calculation by saying something like “yes, but do you know what it feels like to be a piston in an engine?” Alexander Graham Bell became the systems he studied. While he was working on new ways to educate the deaf and mute, he mentally became deaf and mute, and figuratively vanished from his family. Computer programmers and designers have walked around inside their microchips in programs like characters sucked into the world of electronic micro circuitry (see the movie Tron).

These people not only know their subjects objectively, they know them subjectively. But how can you practice empathizing? Practice inner attention, which centers on things we can see, hear, touch and feel in real and imaginary circumstances. Observe your own responses to the world. Remember physical and emotional memories of your responses. Practice external attention to people and things outside yourself. Observe how they respond and react to particular situations or stimuli. Imagine what the object of your external attention is sensing and feeling. Pretend that its world is your world. How would you respond if you were it? Find connections to sensations and emotions that exist in  yourself. Act out the part of a component within the system.

Sparks of Genius: The 13 Thinking Tools of the World’s Most Creative People, Robert and Michele Root-Bernstein, Houghton Mifflin, New York. 1999. [The primary tools are observing, imaging, abstracting, recognizing patterns, forming patterns, analogizing, body thinking, empathizing and dimensional thinking; the integrative tools are modeling, playing, transforming and synthesizing.]

 

 

http://valme.io/content/images/user/3/images/business/Emotional%20Empathy%20Cartoon.jpg

 

 

 

 

Be sure to finish reading Zimmerman’s treatise, esp. pages 15ff, as well as Napi in the new age, and then

skip on to The Defense Intelligence Agency and Shamanism

and its embedded story about “The Stick Game”.

 

Ron uses the Wu Wei theme at WordPress. I am beginning to like this man’s sense of cosmic wit. I’ve never met the man in the flesh but I betcha there’s a certain kind of gleam in his eye.  It’s bright, which may be why he’s always wearing those sunglasses: he doesn’t want to blind you at first glance.

 

http://equivalentexchange.files.wordpress.com/2012/05/wu_wei.jpg?w=450&h=337

 

The principle of least action (or stationary action) seen in the previous entry Noether’s Theorem immediately makes me think of the Taoist concept of wu wei – literally no action or effortless action. It consists of knowing when to act and knowing when not to act (or perhaps even not knowing to act). It also means natural action, or the action of natural physical or biological systems. In Western culture, such action is considered bad and “mechanical” because physical systems are thought to be like clockwork, but in Eastern culture, it is sagelike and enlightened, harmonious. Very often intention, or conscious action, gets in the way and impedes our effort.

Another example that comes to mind is the short story “On the Marionette Theatre” by Heinrich von Kleist. In the story, one of the characters comment that marionettes possess a grace humans do not, a view which contradicts ordinary aesthetics. It is claimed that our consciousness and capacity for reflection cause us to doubt ourselves or become self-conscious, and prevent us from acting with the singlemindedness and purity of an animal or a puppet. For example, a bear in the story is able to successfully fence with the narrator, by deflecting every thrust towards him seemingly without effort. And all feints are ignored, as if the bear is reading the narrator’s mind or knowing the future before it happens.

 

http://equivalentexchange.wordpress.com/2012/05/09/wu-wei-or-natural-action/ 

[Does that sound like aikido?]

 

 

Find those who will walk right next to you through the orchards and the grain, someone who won’t give up in the frozen rain.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_VmZcnWfN6s

 

 

http://www.motivationalquotesabout.com/images/quotes/why-are-you-unhappy-wei-wu-wei.jpg

 

 

 

 

http://daohead.com/images/meditation-full.png

http://daohead.com

 

 

“The truth must penetrate like an arrow — and that is likely to hurt.”

Wei-Wu-Wei

 

The first thing that must be in place in any approach to preparing for the future is to insure that there is sufficient love, laughter, good fun, music, good food, friends and family. No one could be wrong concentrating on those qualities or insuring their presence.

Creativity has not only made the human species unique in Nature; what is more important for the individual, it gives value and purpose to human existence.

Creativity requires more than technical skills and logical thought; it also needs the cultivation and collaboration of the appositional mind. If the constraint of an intellectual ideal can make man a unilateral being, physiologically underdeveloped, a better informed and foresighted community will strive toward a more harmonious development of the organism by assuring an appropriate training and a greater consideration for the other side of the brain.

http://www.its.caltech.edu/~jbogen/text/OSOB_3.html 

 

“FURTHER PRESCRIPTIONS”

My reflections on physicians I have known

Further Prescriptions

 

 

 

 

Is all this an antidote for 

the perfect storm of amnesty of hyperinflation, food riots and race wars?

 

No.  But it’s of value when combined with a totality of effort, including divestiture, self-excision from the system as much as possible, and the development of what Catherine Austin Fitts used to talk about (and probably still does) — the popsicle index, “a map, a plan, and allies”, and mapping your community for money and power.  It probably includes “prepping”, some sound thinking and planning, and more. 

We’re better learn quickly how to find proper leadership who has a thorough understanding of how to get the most out of others. 

 

I’ve been a fan of the role of games and gaming in dialogue for some time: 

“The true value of serious simulation games and the range of other digital learning tools can best be judged by the extent to which they bring people to a higher level of dialogue, discovery, research, learning and collaboration after the game or learning encounter has ended.”

 

See this  (not the first time I’ve encountered mention of the board game Carcassone) and figure out where your people should place their next tile.

 

And after all that work is done, then the love, laughter, good food, good music and good interaction will send the message about what really works. 

 

“… Using children, especially those living in deplorable conditions, for the purpose of a long term destructive agenda has to be considered evil beyond words. Isn’t it? ….

I’m always seeing where folks have good ideas of what must happen to stop the madness. What needs to be done, what doing this, what doing that will accomplish to achieve peace and prosperity and end the rule of the few crazies. What’s missing is the implementation. How we get there? We would like it to be without violence. I’ll have to admit that I don’t know and that is exactly the position that the powers that think they are want us in. Maybe you have some thoughts?”

Posted by kenny at 7:13 PM

Masters of Love is about research into how couples stay together. Failed couples exist in fight-or-flight mode, “prepared to attack and be attacked.” Successful couples create “a climate of trust and intimacy.” They do this by “scanning the social environment for things they can appreciate,” while failed couples are scanning for things to criticize.

I have two more thoughts. First, people who consistently get in bad relationships might enjoy the stimulation of fight-or-flight mode, and seek out partners who make them feel on edge. Second, I think these principles also apply to your relationship with the world, and with yourself. If you’re appreciating little things that go your way, or little things that you do right, you are living better than someone who gets worked up over things that go wrong. Of course it’s still necessary, when things do go wrong, to see them clearly. http://www.ranprieur.com

http://static.fjcdn.com/pictures/lack+of+empathy+you+have.+enjoy_cc15d2_4332556.jpg 

http://cultureofempathy.com/References/Experts/Jeremy-Rifkin.htm 

Thus we come back to Jane Addams and Seymour Melman.  Their positive vision of a peaceful nation, caring society, and independently skilled work force is fading in memory by the day.  Unless we stand up and hold these images of a kinder and more sustainable society in a public way they will be lost to the future generations.

Nothing can be more important in our lives.

posted by Bruce K. Gagnon | 11:33 AM | 1 comments

 

“As we can see from simply looking at a flower, nature knows how to organize itself,” Marianne Williamson wrote recently. “And this same force would organize human affairs if we would allow it to. This allowance occurs whenever we place our minds in correct alignment with the laws of the universe — through prayer, meditation, forgiveness and compassion. Until we do this, we will continue to manifest a world that destroys rather than heals itself. Iraq is a perfect example.”

http://www.informationclearinghouse.info/article38928.htm [journalistic malfeasance of the highest order]

 

 

Catherine Austin Fiits, at https://solari.com/blog , says:

We are not crazy. We are not black sheep. I declare that the time to serve as sin eaters for our families is over. In fact, the time has come for us to lead.

I have members in my family who have spent a life time sucking up to the rich and famous. They are on a hunt for “pet treats” – small amounts of prestige and money for which they will do mind boggling things.

That is their choice – they make their own choices. Our values take us in different directions. So be it.

We each serve our divine purpose. Be proud of it. If you love your family, allow your courage and your intelligence to support them where their matrix-hugging now puts them at risk.

Love them, but do not permit their embrace of incoherence to pressure you to pretend that it is you who are somehow incoherent.

 

 

 

Keith Jarrett Everything that lives, laments 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4C049aW6B0I (10:03)

 

 

“music is simple

 just sing your heart out

it’s over all too soon, as you well know

 and don’t forget to do a little jig !”

— Est

 

Could This Be The End of E-Mail Overload? (3:41)

 

The Jew and the Other: Alain Soral & Gilad Atzmon in Lyon

•Tags: ISRAEL

This lecture appeared on the net 24 hours ago. In spite of its length and depth, it attracted 40.000 viewers in such a short time. The meaning of it is simple:

1. we are a mass movement

2. the future of intellectual exchange is out of the Zionised academia that is suffocated with marginal ‘studies’ that detach humans from questions to do with Being & Time.

 

The late Lynn Margulis

a three-day scientific-philosophical meeting on the Darwinian-evolutionary view of life

The far-more-difficult science-education problem:

The persistent problem is how to wake up public awareness, especially in the global scientifically literate public, of the overwhelming evidence that the three buildings collapsed by controlled demolition. (Much has been published in peer-reviewed scientific journals, see Ch. 4 of The Mysterious Collapse). We, on the basis of hard evidence, must conclude that the petroleum fires related to the aircraft crashes were irrelevant (except perhaps as a cover story).We citizens of Earth within and beyond the boundaries of the United States who demand detailed evidence for extraordinary claims agree with Griffin: the rapid destruction of New York skyscrapers on September 11, 2001 was planned and executed by people inside the US government.

http://rockcreekfreepress.tumblr.com/post/353434420/two-hit-three-down-the-biggest-lie 

 

JODY PAULSON

I believe it’s up to each and every one of us to contribute our own special talents to make this world a better place for all of us.

 

 

 

Nothing is rich but the inexhaustible wealth of nature.  She shows us only surfaces, but she is a million fathoms deep. — Ralph Waldo Emerson

 

 

 

“[Flight attendant Jan] Brown liked everything to be perfect on her flights and lost no opportunity to make it so.  If she was serving passengers in first class, she would write a personal note to each one and tuck it inside the white linen napkin on the service tray. She always called her work “the service”, a nearly religious experience….”

Laurence Gonzales, Page 11, “Flight 232”

http://books.wwnorton.com/books/Flight-232/ 

 

Laborare est orare. 

http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/a-way-of-working-d-m-dooling/1110887921?ean=9780930407018 

In this enriching collection of eleven interrelated essays, A Way of Working explores the ancient relationship of art, order, and craft. Craft is considered as a “sort of ark” for the transmission of real knowledge about being, and about our deep creative aspirations. The book includes contributions from D. M. Dooling, Joseph Cary, Paul Jordan-Smith, Michael Donner, Harry Remde, Jean Kinkead Martine, Jean Sulzberger, Chanit Roston, and P. L. Travers. This group of authors write not as individuals but as members of a community — a guild effort. As one chapter heading put it: the alchemy of craft.

****

 

Face-to-face communications substantially increases levels of cooperation. Indeed, in experimental work done using games that mimics social dilemmas, no other variable appears to have as consistent and strong effect. Even when passing messages via computer terminals, the levels of cooperation are far below those seen in the game played with face-to-face communication. As Elinor Ahlstrom puts it, “exchanging mutual commitment, increasing trust, creating and reinforcing norms, and developing a group identity appeared to be the most important processes that make communication efficacious.” Why? We are wired that way, culturally, genetically and neurologically. Cooperative behavior promotes survival of the gene pool. Large brains, extended families, and community ties mutually embraced one another.

 

Liars, Lovers and Heroes: What the New Brain Science Reveals About How We Become Who We Are, Steven R. Quartz, Ph.D. and Terrence J. Sejnowski, Ph.D., HarperCollins/Wm. Morrow, New York 2002, which notes, in turn:

Marwell and Ames (1979): “experiments on the provision of public goods I:  resources, interest, group size, and the free-rider problem”, American Journal of Sociology 84:1335-60.;

Ledyard, J.  (1995): “Public Goods: A Survey of Experimental Research”, in Handbook of Experiential Economics, edited by Kagel and Roth, Princeton University Press, pp. 111-94;

Dawes, McTavish and Shaklee (1977): “Behavior, communication and assumptions about other people’s behavior in a common dilemma situation, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 35: 1-11;

Sally, D. (1995):  “Conservation, Cooperation and Social Dilemmas: A meta-analysis  of experiments from 1958 to 1992”, Rationality and Society 7:58-92;

Ostrom, E. (1998): “ a behavioral approach to the rational choice theory of collective action”, presidential address, American Political Science Association, American Political Science Review 92:1-21.

 

 

The Forming – Storming – Norming – Performing model

of group development 

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tuckman’s_stages_of_group_development 

 

****

 

Organizational learning: how a team learns to win

 

A learning organization is one in which people continuously expand their capacity to create the results they desire, where new and expansive patterns of thinking are nurtured, where collective aspiration is set free, and where people are continually learning how to learn together.

Most of us at one time or another been part of a great “team”, a group of people who functioned together in an extraordinary way–who trusted one another, who complemented each other’s strengths and compensated for each other’s limitations, who had common goals that were larger than individual goals, and who produced extraordinary results.

I have met many people who have experienced this sort of profound teamwork–in sports, or in the performing arts, or in business. Many say that they have spent much of their life looking for that experience again. What they experienced was a learning organization. The team that became great didn’t start off great–it learned how to produce extraordinary results.

 

The five disciplines of a learning organization:

 

Systems thinking: Events, however distant in time and space, are connected within the same pattern. Each has an influence on the rest, an influence that is usually hidden from view. We tend to focus on snapshots of isolated parts of the system, and wonder why our deepest problems never seem to get solved.

 

Personal mastery: People with a high level of mastery are able to consistently realize the results that matter most deeply to them by becoming committed to their own lifelong learning. Personal mastery is a discipline of continually clarifying and deepening our personal vision, of focusing our energies, of developing patience, and of seeing reality objectively. As such, it is an essential cornerstone of the learning organization–it is the learning organization’s spiritual foundation.

 

Mental models are deeply ingrained assumptions, generalizations or even pictures or images that influence how we understand the world and how we take action. Very often, we are not consciously aware of our mental models or the effects they have on our behavior. Many insights fail to get put into practice because they conflict with powerful, tacit mental models. “The discipline of working with mental models starts with turning the mirror inward; learning to unearth our internal pictures of the world, to bring them to the surface and to hold them rigorously to scrutiny. It also includes the ability to carry on “learningful” conversation that balance inquiry and advocacy, where people expose their own thinking effectively and make their thinking open to the influence of others.

 

Building shared vision: Few organizations have sustained some measure of greatness in the absence of goals, values and missions that had become deeply shared throughout the organization. “When there is a genuine vision (as opposed to the all-too-familiar “vision statement”), people excel and learn, not because they are told to, but because they want to. But many leaders have personal visions that never get translated into shared visions that galvanize an organization. All too often, the team’s vision has revolved around the charisma of a leader, or around a crisis that galvanized everyone temporarily. What has been lacking is a discipline for translating individual vision into shared vision–not a “cookbook” but a set of principles and guiding practices. The practice of shared vision involves the skills of unearthing shared “pictures of the future” that foster genuine commitment and enrollment rather than compliance. In mastering this discipline, readers learn how counterproductive it is to dictate a vision, no matter how heartfelt.

 

Team learning: The discipline of team learning starts with “dialogue”, the capacity of members of the team system to suspend assumptions and enter into a genuine “thinking together”. To the Greeks, dia-logos meant a free-flowing of meeting throughout a group, allowing the group to discover insights not attainable individually. Dialogue differs from the more common “discussion”, which has its roots with “percussion” and “concussion”, really a heaving of ideas back-and-forth in a winner-takes-all competition. The discipline of dialogue also involves learning how to recognize the patterns of interaction in teams that undermine learning. The patterns of defensiveness are often deeply ingrained in how a team operates. If unrecognized, they undermine learning. If recognized and surfaced creatively, they can actually accelerate learning.

“By discipline”, I do not mean an “enforced order” or “means of punishment”, but a body of theory and technique that must be studied and mastered to be put into practice. A discipline is a developmental path for acquiring skill or competency. Practicing a discipline is different from practicing a discipline is different from emulating “a model”. All too often, innovations are described in terms of the “best practices”. Such descriptions can often do more harm than good, leading to piecemeal copying or playing catch-up. No great team is ever been built trying to emulate another one; individual greatness is not achieved by trying to copy another “great person”.

When you ask people about what it is being like part of a great team, what is most striking is the meaningfulness of the experience. People talk about being part of something larger than themselves, of being connected, of being generative. It becomes quite clear that, for many, their experiences as part of truly great teams stand out as singular periods of life lived to the fullest. Some spent the rest of their lives trying to recapture that spirit.

Learning has become synonymous with “taking in information”, which is only distantly related to real learning. It would be silly to say “I just read a great book about bicycle riding–now I can ride a bike”. Real learning gets to the heart of what it means to be human. Through learning we re-create ourselves. Through learning we become able to do something were never able to do. Through learning we extend our capacity to create, to be part of the generative process of life. There is within each of us a deep hunger for this type of learning.
The Fifth Discipline: The Art and Practice of a Learning Organization, Peter Senge, Doubleday/Currency, New York, 1990. [This is not a particularly easy book to read or understand but, for the individual involved in leading organizations, it has some powerful and wonderfully unsettling ideas. See also The Fifth Discipline Workbook: Strategies and Tools for Building a Learning Organization, Peter Senge et al, Doubleday/Currency, New York. 1994.]

 

****

 

http://img.nauticexpo.com/images_ne/photo-g/rowing-shell-competition-octuple-scull-with-coxswain-22350-320831.jpg 

The coxswain voices perceptions but not judgments. By giving feedback about how the boat feels in a tone that is engaged but neutral, the coxswain hands the rowers a problem and lets them find a solution. The crew will learn at its fastest rate if it can perform its athletic experiments without the emotional noise of criticism. As in any science, the work goes best when the experimenters fix their attention on the lab bench rather than on their opinions of themselves and each other.

Mind Over Water: Lessons on Life from the Art of Rowing, Craig Lambert,
Houghton Mifflin, New York, 1998.

****

Mobility and Alignment of Purpose

One’s true capacity for moving, or being moved, can be achieved only when one’s commitment to others is in fact connected to and derives from his primary commitment to himself.

When we find this kind of alignment of purpose, there is a harmony of motivation that can provide the fuel in clarity overcome great obstacles in the pursuit of great challenge.

 

The Inner Game of Work, W. Timothy Gallwey, Random House, 2000. [Aimed at the corporate / management market, its sections on coaching are exceptional for their insights on how to empower others.]

****

A leader is best

when people barely know that he exists,

not so good when people obey him and acclaim him,

worst when they despise him.

 

If you fail to honor people, they will fail to honor you.

But of a good leader, who boasts little,

When his work is done, his aim fulfilled,

they will all saywe did this ourselves’.

Lao Tzu, Tao Te Ching

 

****

kennyJuly 11, 2014 at 6:49 AM

 

“In the sixth century BC, the Chinese philosopher Lao Tzu identified the world’s biggest problem. Individuals viewed themselves as powerless. The burden of impotence made them resent others and fear life, which, in turn, led them to seek power through controlling others. The quest was not an expression of authority, but one of aggression. Lao Tzu rooted most of social problems in the individual’s sense of paralysis.”

The Power of the Powerlesst

from a comment at the article…

“It is consent, withdrawal of consent that tyrants are afraid of. Our own government see’s peoples withdrawal of their consent as the existential threat to the state, its power, and those running it.

Indeed, the truth sets one free in every myriad way, it is Liberty, it is the utmost in legitimacy of people.

It is upstream of tyranny and tyrants.

The truth reveals the illegitimacy of those in power and their lawlessness.”

[I have problems with strategies and online kibitzers who lobby for giving “The State” a few more shoves down the road toward collapse without a concerted and detailed discussion about how massive amounts of people (locally or globally) will manage to function well enough to survive, let alone thrive, or without any discussion of the types of socio-governmental approaches will prevent further violence and destruction. Sacrificing life, liberty and the pursuit of eudaimonia won’t prevent anything except life, liberty and Eudaimonia.]

 

What can we do?

 

What can we do?

 

Music audio:

Dhafer Youssef & Hüsnü Şenlendirici 

‘dance of the invisible dervishes’ 

19.07.2012 Istanbul

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U8n24hAhmEM 

(36:50)

“What can we do?” is an attempt to answer the question for myself and perhaps for others “what we can doin the face of rampant, nearly-unstoppable psychopathological evil taking form in genocide, endless war, total surveillance, advancing militarization, and near-complete totalitarianism.

I apologize for the length of this entry (100 pages). Brevity has never been my strong suit.  But I am learning and trying. (Mrs. Blogger brought home from the book store two more books: “Born to Blog” and “Twitter for Dummies”. Mastery of the latter requires brevity and it will also help the former.)

I have broken the piece down into three chunks, and I will provide a summary/abstract follows and is repeated at the conclusion. See the tag cloud above.

The whole thing contains 78 links, seven pdf’s, five videos totaling 19 minutes, and nine pieces of music totaling 93 minutes.

It is an opinion, a POV, a synthesis that contains some thoughts about self-awareness, the use of the metaphor of aikido in communications and relationships, the story about Gurdjieff’s teachers by LeFort, the book “Born to be Good” by Keltner (about the facial muscles and communications, and more), a book by Standage about social media as practiced for two millennia, some thoughts about physicians entailed “Further Prescriptions”, and a book by a physician entitled “Why Us?”.

Indeed, why us?

It is broken into three parts.

Part One, including this summary or abstract, runs about 20 pages and includes the introductory thoughts, a four-page pdf intro to Dacher Keltner’s “Born to Be Good: The Science of a Meaningful Life”,  a 4-page pdf sidebar on verbal aikido and the use of aikido concepts in situations of conflict (and there are other books by Dobson, Heckler, et al), some thoughts on awareness, an intro to LeFanu’s book “Why Us?” and a 15-page pdf of excerpts, some thoughts on conflict, and catharsis, a link to a major article on planetary consciousness, another on native American perspectives, and a short look at my own orientation to mountains.

Part Two focuses on empathy, the concept of wu wei, creativity, contains a 14-page look at my orientation to physicians, has a further focus on children, relationships, society, alignment, leadership, the failure of science in a specific case as noted by a highly-recognized-and-honored scientist, more on face-to-face communication, and a short précis on organizational learning.

Part Three looks at happiness, self-awareness, Heaven, truth, conflict, some further personal expressions on what we can do, a look at Rafael LeFort’s story about his search for the teachers of Gurdjieff (as well as links to articles that have an opposing POV) and an academic paper on the influence of Gurdjieff on noted jazz pianist Keith Jarrett).

What we can do is to keep learning.  This comes from LeFort’s story about Gurdjieff and elsewhere. 

We can learn about consciousness (see Zimmerman, Burrowes, Le Fanu et al, and consult your own mind). 

We can gravitate toward truth, at least our truth

We can practice alignment

We can engage in harmony during conflict (see Ueshiba). 

We can become better at and practice more frequently the arts and sciences of interaction, encounter, and face-to-face communications (see Keltner). 

We can master social media (see the books mentioned above, and others, and Standage). 

We can create community (see Corbett). 

We can become leaders of our communities, if only through the above steps. 

We can teach our truth (see “Architect for Learning”). 

We can engage with the dominant mainstream media more effectively, and we can create new media

We can create. 

We can touch people. 

We can move people.

We can love. 

 

Comments are welcome through the contact page.  I will assemble the best and most articulate, and post them.

 

 

What can we do? (Part One)

I awoke one Saturday morning a couple of weeks ago with a lot on my mind.  

Perhaps it was remnants of a dream, or more likely the mental dust from having browsed a few books lying around on my bed and bedside table.

Right now, my reading has been somewhat discombobulated; I’m jumping around.

I jump from book to book, and personal problem or encounterto another of a different type, and then back to a book after extended reading on the world wide web.

Sometimes synthesis emerges from this.

I decided I’ll give it a try here.

My biases, I noted to myself, are that I come from

  • an autodidactic study of positive/performance psychology with a minor sub-branch in cognitive science that seeks to empower individuals,
  • from a lifetime of focus on emergency service, and
  • from the combination of those two in teamwork and leadership.

Pressing on the corpus callosum of synthesis: the recent expressions of frustration and despair I’ve seen on the net which join my own.

I speak of Kenny and Noor, specifically, though they are only representative of a much larger group.

“In my travels this week it has been both discouraging and disappointing to find that although there are many willing to talk about what’s going on in Iraq and the Middle East, there are few who understand what is really happening. That’s not to say I have it all correct but most regurgitate the mainstream slop as reality and it means the propaganda is working. A calm mention of false flags and hired deviant Wahhabi terrorists or wars for empire and Israel are met with odd looks. Americans are so slow to catch on and admit they have been deceived. Awareness is a first line defense. Unfortunately it is in short supply.”

Posted by kenny at 12:02 PM

We all ask what is it that we can do….

“Your contribution can be as simple as making changes in your personal life and aligning yourself with right principles and truth. It may be as big as speaking out on important issues and spreading ideas for change.…”

http://www.washingtonsblog.com/2014/05/rogue-government-prepares-heated-conflict-historical-cycles-point-coming-clash.html

A number of pictures serve as the backdrop; all of them feature children. The best of us think of the children we know and how we can care for them, guide them, nurture them. (How can you not cry when you read of Namous?)

 

http://news.bbcimg.co.uk/media/images/75588000/jpg/_75588871_022736352-1.jpg  

[Shirley Horn sings in the background …. “Why Didn’t I See?”

Earlier, she asked  “Where Do You Start?” ]

(Music informs our personal and interpersonal synthesis.)

 

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-aA7CSWXN7cE/U6Q_og6xOCI/AAAAAAAAEr0/M3lDi9IYbDY/s1600/gaza+city.jpg 

Israeli airstrike creates a pond in Gaza City

 

 

I read about the world and the current turns of events; all I want to do is weep.

Iraq again? I am speechless at what these demons do to work their evil on Russia and China via Iran via Iraq. Iraq was Balkanized for the creation of just such regional wars as we see today ~ all goes according to plan.

I read about the nuclear depopulation programme in place and feel so helpless ~ there is so much to Iraq and DU and Fukushima and Chernobyl ~ it is overwhelming. But, I digress, back to Iraq.

What plan? Any plan. They have created so many stewpots of division and hatred around the globe that there is no shortage of plans to fall back on. Anywhere.

That hatred we work so hard to keep under wraps is giving me a tough time. Hatred is such an easy fix but giving in to hatred means one has given up all hope. It concedes defeat. It is a weakness to be exploited since hatred seems to warp all focus. So I cry a lot it seems. Listen to a lot of music, stare out the window and think. That light at the end of the tunnel seems to get further and further away.

Our losses seem to keep mounting up, like the Canadian Federal Government approving the Enron pipeline this week.   Yet they have the nerve to brag about Canada’s environmental record! No one wants this development although it is already far more along than most people are aware. Construction preparation is well underway. It makes me truly want to vomit.

Posted by Noor al Haqiqa at 11:54 PM

 

All this has, of course, intensified as a result of the events in the Ukraine and the continued and escalated genocidal attacks on the people — especially the children — inside the open-air concentration camp known as Gaza. These are modern-day technological advances on the occupation of Native American lands and the actions at Wounded Knee et al.

The books include Dacher Kelter’s “Born to Be Good: The Science of a Meaningful Life” [see http://greatergood.berkeley.edu/author/Dacher_Keltner], started in seriousness, with highlighter as bookmark, before I got distracted with having to pack everything and hump it all down a flight of stairs. In my case, a lot of the heavy lifting got done by family. I hit a rut when he got to the part about coding facial displays and understanding the emotional controls through the vagus nerve. I stopped at the the facial muscular vocabulary and the choreography of “smile”, and have yet to tackle the parallel material dealing with “laughter”, “tease”, “touch”, “love”, “compassion”, “awe” and “reverence”.

Because I tend to jump around, I did highlight a small piece on page 226 which read as follows:

Flight/fight tendencies of self-preservation are continually at odds with tendencies to care in the electro-chemical flow of our nervous systems. The content of the mind shifts between the press of self-interest and the push of compassion. The ebb and flow of marriages, families, friends, and workplaces track a dynamic tension between these two great forces — raw self-interest and a devotion of the welfare of the other. The study of emotion is experiencing its own “sympathy breakthrough” thanks to recent studies of compassion, which are revealing this care taking emotion to be built into our nervous systems. The study of this emotion holds new clues about the health of marriages, families, and communities.

 

I’ve picked Born To Be Good back up now and you can follow along: see the sidebar in pdf format here.     Dacher Keltner Jen

Is this a suggestion for the value of face-to-face interaction in a world heavily given to faceless social media? Yes.

How do we encounter people halfway across the globe and who speak a different language?

Is the emerging technology of online collaboration viable?

Online_Collabloration_Paper

 

I’ve all-but-finished Tom Standage’s “Writing on the Wall” [ writing-on-the-wall ], a chronology of media since the days of the Roman Empire; I’m the 20th century and moving toward the 21st. I’m at the part where he describes the development of “webs” of communication among the telegraph operators (foreshadowing “Mr. Tom” and his friends who used listserv mechanisms among computer operators before the Internet was formalized.) [Today you can build a private discussion board for invited guests only or fashion a Twitter network.] There are some good thoughts about the press and the social media which make me, a blogger by choice, reflect. I’ll have to finish his section on radio and its use as a means of propaganda dissemination; today we have podcasting. And I haven’t yet delved into his discussion of television, “the drug of the nation”. But then I already have a degree in communications studies and I have blogged about these for years.

I’ve watched/listened to James Corbett’s podcast/video which promises and delivers free and critical thinking; as a blogger, I’m certainly an alternative and have left the MSM/TV world except as momentary entertainment or glimpse into the world to which I am opposed. [They’re watching us so intensively that we need to keep an eye on them to know what they’re doing, capable of, and planning.]

 

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-dJz4fO4BnGs/U6Ui5TduEvI/AAAAAAAB9Ag/Lpn_kJc8Rsw/s1600/Calvin-Louv.jpg

I’m working on and thinking a lot about verbal aikido, or the application of the lessons of the Shintoism-oriented shaman I know as O Sensei, that little man who took the violence that he found and transformed it into an effective tool of defense and simultaneously a tool of teaching, enlightenment and love.

He reminds me of Derrick Jensen in his transmutation of hate and violence into teaching and activism [see “A Language Older Than Words” et alia].

I write a lot about aikido, not because I progressed far in the discipline but because it fascinates me and I’ve read a lot about it.  [I did progress far enough to peer through the rip in the curtain.]  Again, see the sidebar on aikido below.

 

 

aikido and relationships 

I mentioned my fascination with what aikido has to teach us about relationships and the fact that it might inform someone close to me about whom I care deeply (both parties in the conflict) in a short e-mail to a new contact; he’s a fellow who has had significant contact with the world of military intelligence but left it and explored the world of Native Americans.

He sent me

Being Nature’s Mind: Indigenous Ways of Knowing and Planetary Consciousness [ delvingdeeper.org/being.pdf ]as well as a link to his own work:

Napi in the new age (on quantum mechanics and the Native American).

What jump-started this thought process was having leafed through some sections of James Le Fanu’s “Why Us?: How Science Rediscovered The Mystery of Ourselves”:

http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/why-us-james-le-fanu/1112946548?ean=9780307378071.

Le Fanu is an open critic of materialism and Darwinism.[4] He is the author of the controversial book Why Us?: How Science Rediscovered the Mystery of Ourselves, in which he claims that Darwin’s theory of evolution is a materialistic theory that fails to explain consciousness and the experience of the human being.[4] He states that it is not enough to conjure the wonder of the human experience from the study of bones, genes and brains alone.[7] According to a review of his book by the New Scientist, Le Fanu argues for the existence of an immaterial “life force”.[8] Le Fanu is not a creationist and does not argue for God, instead he argues for a non-physical cosmic force which he claims could explain where consciousness originates from; he also claims it may explain many of the other mysteries unexplained by material science.[9][10] 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Le_Fanu

.http://www.worldmag.com/media/images/content/348_348_/lefanu.jpg

For more on this book and author, see the sidebar below entitled “Why Should We Be Different?”

Why Should We Be So Different?

 

I’ve spoken of the need to find or form an association of bloggers — perhaps this feeds into Corbett’s thoughts on alternative media — and Ron said he wanted to know what I’d found, or join in.  [He’s already done so with his contributions here.]

James speaks of empaths [I hope I am one] and psychopaths [I’ve met more than a few and hope that I am not one of their peers.].

James says “It is a fundamental mistake to battle your opponent using their weapon of choice”, an interesting variation of the aikido lessons about disarming an opponent.

But how do you disarm an opponent that is armed to the teeth?

http://www.examiner.com/images/blog/EXID24575/images/Kobudo2.JPG 

http://www.examiner.com/article/weapons-as-part-of-your-training 

The picture is reminiscent of the staves carried by the residents of Worcester County as described in Ray Raphael’s “First American Revolution”.

Taking the weapon away from the opponent:

You must take a position in which you are facing the same direction or “seeing things” the way your opponent does… you must get close to him in order to control him and his weapon. 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tVaC2UY1vRA (2:32)

 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yrJ5Y6tuNj8 (1:56)

Compare this to the infiltrative techniques practiced and taught by neoconservative Jewish intellectualism and the theories espoused by Edward Luttwak in his book Coup d’État: A Practical Handbook

What is the effective counter-move? 

If the truest, most honorable warriors were willing to risk their lives to count coup on an opponent without intention of harming that opponent, we can only marvel at the nonviolent psychology and wonder where it might have gone.

http://hastingsnonviolence.blogspot.com/2010/10/counting-coup-and-evolution-of-conflict.html

Brad J. Bushman published “Does Venting Anger Feed or Extinguish the Flame?” (PSPB, Vol. 28 No. 6, June 2002 724-731) which demonstrates that “catharsis” is not effective in reducing anger or aggressiveness. While expressing emotion is healthy, it does not extinguish the source of the emotion. Learning to kick, punch, or be “powerful” doesn’t deal with the issue causing negative emotion and this study demonstrates that individuals who depend on cathartic behaviors tend to be more reactive in future moments of stress, anxiety, and conflict.

http://www.searchofpeace.com/blog/2014/07/09/letting-off-steam-is-not-the-ki/

Zimmerman’s treatise on indigenous and Native American spirituality, sent on by Ron, talks about unbridgeable chasms between culture, methods by which we can “finally begin to see into another way of being and other ways of knowing”, and introduces the topic of child-rearing. The hand that rocks the cradle, and the involvement of the village, and other theories not withstanding, Zimmerman, George Lakoff, and Ron approach the issue from the perspective of “dialogue at the meta-level”.

Mary Jane Zimmerman’s goal “is to help readers from any culture begin to become aware of how deeply embedded our cultural modes of perceiving are and how different they may be from those of other cultures. This type of self-reflexive awareness is necessary for true dialogue and can also be facilitated by dialogue.”

“It is now crucial for members of the dominant Western culture to begin to see how current global environmental, social, and political problems have sprung from the Western tendency to think in terms of discrete units and how we have largely lost the ability to see connected, interwoven patterns of motion.”

I’m not going to try to characterize Ron’s perspective. I’ve just begun to get to know and read this fellow and I am struck by the depth of his experience and perception. We share some common experiences and interests, but probably in the way that an apple and a banana both share a peel. I urge you to begin to read his blog. I have much to learn. I also urge you to read Mary Jane Zimmerman’s work on planetary consciousness

“… everything in the cosmos is connected and that all physical bodies and all minds are expressions of a deeper spiritual essence “(Begay and Maryboy 277)….

“The human is closely related to the mountain because both exist at the center between Mother Earth and Father Sky.”

The Native American and the Taoist — connected through a land bridge— both understand this.  The Shintoist Morihei Ueshiba understands this and brings it to the art and discipline of aikido. There’s an understanding of quantum physics buried in all of this too. It is spoken of as “a participatory understanding of reality. If we see the world as a place of gift, where the earth and the beings on the earth are fond of humans and want to help them, we will experience its abundance; we will be able to ‘participate in the conversation of the Gift’.”

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/3/35/Mount_Greylock_Massive.JPG/569px-Mount_Greylock_Massive.JPG

My own relationship with mountains includes Greylock and Cadillac. I have chunks of granite and marble from each as desktop talismans. I’ve seen the sunrises and sunsets off both, have camped on or near them, but these are not uncommon experiences. Nor, I hope, are the ones I’ve had throughout New England in moments of deep meditation.

Greylock is one of the rare and southern-most taigaboreal forests in New England.  I spent a decade living in the lower mouth of the glacial cirque at its Western base; that location is hidden, at virtual dead center in the photo. The Taconic range stands behind to the west.  The estate belonging to a Rockefeller and her husband and devoted to the genetic betterment of farm livestock sprawled across one of its ridges. [How is is that we are interested in breeding better cows and chickens at the same time we bomb wheat fields?]

The origin of the present name of Greylock and its association with the mountain is unclear. It first appeared in print about 1819, and came into popular use by the 1830s. It may be in reference to its appearance, as it often has a gray cloud, or lock of gray mist upon his head, or in tribute to a legendary Native American chief, Gray Lock.[18] Gray Lock (c. 1670-1750) was a Western Abenaki Missisquoi chief of Woronoco-Pocomtuc ancestry, born near Westfield, Massachusetts. Gray Lock distinguished himself by conducting guerrilla raids into Vermont and western Massachusetts.[19]

Derrick Jensen’s works speak of forging an orientation to and awareness of the indigenous people who once occupied the land you occupy.

The Mahican people were closely associated with this region, and it was easy for a child weaned on “Light in the Forest” to imagine himself a Mahican as he walked, ran and sat in contemplation.

One day when I was about 12, I set on my haunches on the edge of a brook, lost in the thoughts facilitated by the continuous burble of the run-off from the rain forest.

A bobcat came down the to the edge of the stream to drink its fill.

http://www.nhptv.org/natureworks/graphics/lynx5.jpg

I wasn’t afraid. It looked up at me suddenly when it discovered that I was there too, but I instantly and silently telegraphed a message that I meant it no harm. It turned back to its satiation, and then disappeared as suddenly and quietly as it came.

Years later, I sat with my back against the warm granite shelving of Pemaquid Point and listened to the waves as I basked in the sun. I think the expression “lost in reverie” is appropriate; I was on the way home from a three-day honeymoon trip up the coast of Maine to Acadia and back. I’d shown the future mother/grandmother the loveliness of Mount Desert Island.  I still kick myself when I think about the fact that we couldn’t find the way to buy that 10-acre plot of land at the northern-most tip of Somes Sound. But coastal Maine has lots of magic to be found in it, and that afternoon it sent me a message. I’ve written about that moment several times. It was an epiphany.

The message I got in an instant, downloaded at quantum speed, was that I was part of it all, and I was it, and that it was me, and that I was “here” for it, and that it was “here” for me.

http://www.apertureofmysoul.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/Pemaquidlongviewrockssmall.jpg

“Rupert Ross, a Canadian lawyer who has worked most of his life on the northern reserves in Ontario, also writes about the sensitivity and open attitude required to learn what he calls “pattern-thought,” the ability to take in vast amounts of information from the natural world (70).”

Derrick Jensen has written an entire book on this called “Listening to the Land”, “conversations with environmentalists, theologians, Native Americans, psychologists, and feminists, engaging some of our best minds in an exploration of more peaceful ways to live on Earth.”

Michael Murphy and others have delved deeply into the ways in which the human mind can connect with the cosmos; I think in particular of “In The Zone” and The Future of the Body, “a massive historical and cross-cultural collection of documentation of various occurrences of extraordinary human functioning such as healing, hypnosis, martial arts, yogic techniques, telepathy, clairvoyance, and feats of superhuman strength. Rather than presenting such documentation as scientific proof, he presents it as a body of evidence to motivate further investigation.”  [ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michael_Murphy_(author) ]

Ron sent me something on remote viewing, too.

Mindmap to Enhance Your World

I’d like to offer an explanation of my Mind Map 2014. Click on it; it’s an uploaded and upgraded two-page pdf.  The word map as intended to be a mindmap, but I didn’t have either the proper software or outstanding artistic skills, so I cheated, and did the best I could.

Its purpose is to be an elemental guide to the content of that old collection of excerpts I called “Summon The Magic” whose mission is to allow you to come to a functional understanding of how you can learn to use your mind or brain to its best advantage, to make it work for you.

You can also see it from the perspective of a parent, teacher, trainer, learning coach, business leader, entrepreneur or a creative artist.

 

An explanation is useful and will extend the value of the “mind map”. Creating such an explanation is also a review of the material for me.

If you printed out the sheets, widened the margins so it can breathe better, taped the second sheet to the bottom of the first sheet, and got out some fine-point colored ink markers and a ruler and French curve ….

http://etc.usf.edu/clipart/76100/76130/76130_ellip_frncrv_md.gif 

then you could stand back and see the structure flow from head to foot.

 

The top, surrounding the word Intelligences, is a riff off of the seminal work of Howard Gardner.

http://www.tecweb.org/styles/gardner.html 

http://www.bgfl.org/bgfl/custom/resources_ftp/client_ftp/ks3/ict/multiple_int/what.cfm 

Seven Times Smarter: 50 Activities, Games and Projects to Develop the Seven Intelligences of Your Child, Laurel Schmidt, Three Rivers Press, New York 2001.

 

You can examine any of those sub-headings or multiple intelligences and see where your strengths and weaknesses lie.

You can work with and improve on your strengths, and seek to improve your weaknesses.

Your particular mix can be identified and provide some further sense of direction for your further studies, your career, or how you can apply what you already know in the areas of your strongest intelligences.

Google for the term “multiple intelligences” and scan for additional titles by Gardner. http://howardgardner.com/

 

http://rebeccaholder28.files.wordpress.com/2013/02/sci-ed.jpg 

 

The second block, what might be seen as the shoulders of the skeletal structure, center around the triad of Learning, Training, and Education.

Those who provide those processes to you operate from positions of trust, power, authority and respect.

[Here is a 25-page pdf “On Mentors and Coaches”]

You bring to your mentors, teachers and coaches your interests, curiosity, awe, yearning and inquiry. [You could spend 30 minutes simply listing elements within those five categories for you.]

Your coaches and trainers will provide — particularly if they are training a neuromuscular activity — the practice, repetition, and cognitive cues; you have to do the homework, the drills and go to practice/class and thus provide the repetition, the habit, and then find your groove.

Both of you will work along the spectrum of awareness and interest, applying discipline to the point of absorption.

 

 

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-vZ4nt8boxrs/UaJ1BHp97hI/AAAAAAAAHqQ/iT4ovmKe4hQ/s1600/13thinking.jpg 

 

Sparks of Genius: The 13 Thinking Tools of the World’s Most Creative People, Robert and Michele Root-Bernstein, Houghton Mifflin, New York. 1999.

http://www.e-bookspdf.org/download/sparks-of-genius.html 

 

 

 

http://ericbooth.net/wp-content/uploads/2012/12/The-Everyday-Work-of-Art-Awakening-the-Extraordinary-in-Your-Daily-Life-Eric-Booth-9780595193806-Amazon.com-Books.png

 

Use your PREP tool: your personally-relevant entry point

We are what we are attracted to, and become what we yearn toward.

Follow your attraction through the spectrum of curiosity, interest, admiration, concern, connection, resonance and change.

 

The Everyday Work of Art: Awakening the Extraordinary in Your Daily Life, Eric Booth, Authors’ Guild Back-in-Print (iUniverse.com) (ISBN 0-595-19380-3)

 

“… Inherent in the artistic experience is the capacity to expand our sense of the way the world is or might be. This amazing human imaginative, empathetic capacity provides the artistic experience….. An entry point is a distinctive aesthetic feature of the work with enough dynamic relevance that many people will be able to apply it to parts of their own lives to discover meaningful relevance….To learn more about entry points or teaching artistry, read my book mentioned above, or check out many available essays on my website (ericbooth.net) or read David Wallace’s excellent book Reaching Out. ….

http://ericbooth.net/three-and-a-half-bestsellers/

Following your personally-relevant entry point is the backbone of the flow theory. It’s how you become engaged and absorbed.

Flow: The Psychology of Optimal Experience, Mihalyi Csikszentmihalyi, Harper & Row, New York, 1990. [The flow theory is a major component in performance enhancement and is a wellspring for many applications. See also his sequel The Evolving Self, as well as Flow in Sports.]

 

Notice that it all starts with intent. 

 

Attention has four axes: broad, narrow, external, and internal.

 

A simple explanation with athletic implications is Nideffer’s model.

http://www.science.smith.edu/exer_sci/ESS565/MPres1/sld011.htm 

 

Attention is a core property of all perceptual and cognitive operations.

 

A lengthy, detailed, “taxonomy of internal and external attention”  from the perspective of psychology, neurobiology and brain research can be found here:

http://www.princeton.edu/ntblab/pdfs/Chun_ARP_2011.pdf 

 

You sharpen the point of the spear of discipline with concentration, which eventually leads to harmony and synthesis of the whole.

 

The torso of the skeletal structure of the mind map is centered around split symmetry. [The “translation” of the text and its various fonts into a pdf format somewhat destroyed this functional symmetry in earlier versions; the uploaded version here is improved with the upgraded Mavericks OS software.]

 

Put the gestalt mind {-} logic mind in the middle.

You have to use both sides in a balanced way; binaural beat-based guided brain wave meditation opens up your corpus callosum and exercises it.

 

At the top, the spectrum or curve of desire:

First you have or discover a passion, even temporarily; this then generates a fantasy (“wouldn’t it be nice if…?) which sometimes turns into an extended or developed dream. The dream transforms itself into a vision when you add detail. And then you’re only a step or two from developing an objective, or a list of them. You start to set goals.

Your mentors, guides and teachers can help you differentiate your goals

as outcome goals, behavioral goals, and process goals.

 

Motivation’s four dimensions:

Targeted zone of behavior

(e.g., be more consistent, stop swearing, focus on defense).

Quantity of behavior

(e.g., run more miles today than yesterday);

Quality of behavior

(e.g., shoot free throws more accurately);

Intensity of behavior 

(e.g., level of activation and amount of energy delivered).

 It’s your choice…

  • where to be active,
  • how much to be active,
  • what level of excellence to aim  for, and
  • how much of yourself to invest.

Coaches Guide to Sport Psychology, Rainer Martens, Ph.D., Human Kinetics, Champaign, IL, 1997. [A high-level academic textbook for coaches.]

Here is a 15-page pdf on the topic of goals: Goals pdf

 

The second tier of the torso of the skeletal structure of the mind map pertains to Spirit, Mind and Body. It is breath that links these three key elements. While one can study intensely the role of breathing in psychology and physiology, its relevance to meditation, etc., the simplest approach is to pay attention to your breathing.

On the body end of the triad are the brain, the lungs, the heart, the digestive system (much more important than we generally understand). You could spend a lifetime appreciating the interactions. Such is proprioception and kinesthetic awareness. The gamma system of your neurology is your internal feedback loop.

Within the mind, there are entire libraries and sciences given over to your exploration. Add colleges, associations, think tanks, institutes and so on and you can get lost and dis-oriented. Stop thinking; keep breathing; believe in yourself.

At the spirit end of the spectrum are awe, yūgen (profound grace and subtlety)[1], satori, stillness, silence, surrender, sacred places, empathy, love and gratitude. Again, there are libraries, book vendors, churches and religious institutes and their leaders, pastors, rabbis, gurus, shamans and charlatans. But you can pray and learn to meditate without them.

http://img.pandawhale.com/post-25617-yugen-meaning-gif-XonM.gif 

 

Some of the vertebral joints in the skeletal structure of the mind map include:

the aikido-based triad of balance, centering and grounding (Richard Strozzi Heckler is an outstanding writer and teacher, though there are surely others);

the triad of renewal, relaxation and rest ( look for the books by Jim Loehr, Ed.D. in  http://boydownthelane.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/Bibliography-pdf.pdf );

the criss-crossed axes of connection, detachment, differentiation and integration through which we move our self; sometimes we must be apart, sometimes we must be with others, sometimes we feel different, sometimes we feel similar; we are unique and yet we are an integral part of It all (this is the epiphany I had sitting still, basking in the sun listening to the sounds of the waves sitting on the granite cliffs at Pemaquid Point, the grand ripping of the Curtain to which I surrendered through my silence);

the spectrum of physical activity that includes art, music (musicians are athletes of the small muscle groups), the martial arts, dance, play, recreation and sport (see Deep Play, Diane Ackerman, Random House, New York, 1999);

the grand Daoistic dynamic symmetry of contemplation and action, in the middle of which sits continuous incremental improvement;

examples of awakened mental development which extends from meditation and mindfulness to visualization and mental rehearsal and beyond through autogenic training (the bibliography contains many books on meditation and mindfulness: see below for the ones I recommend)

(think of it as preventive mind control under your complete control, ownership and decision-making process); 

and, finally,

the multi-faceted diamond of skills and challenge, of flow and action, of goals band feedback, and its core of immersion, immediacy and intensity.

 

 

http://russpetcoff.files.wordpress.com/2011/04/nate-appleman.jpg 

Source of image:

https://deeppoliticsforum.com/forums/entry.php?12-Intensity-Immediacy-and-Immersion 

 

On Autogenic Training:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Autogenic_training 

Google the term for more.

The Break-Out Principle, Herbert Benson, M.D. and William Proctor, Scribner, New York 2003. [How to activate your accessible biomechanical “trigger” to power up creativity, insight, stress-reduction, and top-notch performance, by the author of The Relaxation Response.]

On Mindfulness:

Mindfulness, Ellen J. Langer, Addison-Wesley Publishing, Reading, MA 1989. [The apposition/antidote to mindlessness, by a Harvard psychology professor.]

Counter Clockwise: mindful health and the power of possibility, Ellen Langer, Ballantine Books, NY 2009.

Emotional Alchemy: How The Mind Can Heal the Heart, Tara Bennett-Goleman, Harmony Books, NY 2001. [Written by a psychotherapist, the wife of the author of the book Emotional Intelligence, on schema therapy and mindfulness.]

On Becoming An Artist, Ellen Langer, Ballantine Books, NY 2005.

The Power of Mindful Learning, Ellen Langer, PhD., Addison-Wesley Publishing, Reading, MA 1995. [Ought to be required reading for all teachers and coaches.]

Wherever You Go, There You Are: Mindfulness Meditation in Everyday Life, Jon Kabat-Zinn, Hyperion, NY 1994. [This is considered elemental; the author teaches how mindfulness is applied to stress reduction and one’s physical health,  and was affiliated with the University of Massachusetts Medical School. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jon_Kabat-Zinn ] See http://www.mindfulnesscds.com 

 

 

The hips and thighs of the skeletal structure of the mind map, the pivot points and strengths, include emotion and physiology.

Physiology gives us vision and perception (including acuity and peripheral awareness), the flexibility, agility and dynamism of movement in space, and the structure, speed and flexibility with which we choose action and movement, and the strength, balance and force with which we execute that action and movement.

Emotion has to do with belief (world-view, and belief in self), identity, faith, expectation, passion, dedication, choice, commitment, doubt, tension and anxiety, fear, distraction, intention, focus and composure.

It also brings together all of the comprehension of all of the factors that we bring to bear through our trip down the framework. You can’t execute excellence crisply if you don’t comprehend what you’re doing, who you are, and how to do it.

 

The knees, calves and ankle joints of the skeletal structure are the five A’s 

(attention, acceptance, appreciation, affection, and allowing);

see David Richco’s books, or google the phrase in red.

 

I’ve included them twice for a simple reason: you have to apply them to your own self first,

 

and then you have to apply them to everyone else.

The connecting tissue is the understanding of losing your self-consciousness in the way you go about things. From a strictly training and performance perspective, you have to learn the skill or technique so well that you can put aside thinking about how to do it. It is the highest form of meditation in the middle of action. Artistic expression, dance, the martial arts, and deep play are all places where we practice losing our self-consciousness.

Losing self-consciousness is not about losing awareness or focus. It’s about getting beyond your self, not making you and your needs the primary issue or drive. We’ve all driven in and out of strip malls and box stores where we encountered people who are stuck in self-consciousness. They’re lost in their cell phone conversation at 35 mph; they aren’t aware of the presence of you or anyone else. This is the mindlessness for which mindfulness is the antidote.

I submit that this is at the root of the currently dominant world-view.

 

http://www.wellnesscoachingaustralia.com.au/Blog%20images/mindlessness.jpg 

 

The entire skeletal structure of the mind map rests on the feet.

 

The two feet are leadership and team.

The feet are what propel you, keep you grounded, provide secure footing, enable you to walk, or run, or sprint, or run a long-distance race.

If there is someone out there in the world that thinks you can achieve something worthwhile alone, without the integrated interaction of at least a few, or several, then they need to send in a comment and some suggested readings.

 

Both leadership and team start with intent.

Team is also about expectation and cohesion, trust, communication, character, learning, and energy.

Leadership is about convocation (calling people together), will, audacity, courage, and enrollment (or getting others to sign on to the task).

Leadership is also about vision, clarity, energy, vision, and communications skills; it requires intellect, heart, humility, the ability to model behavior and action, the ability to create and sustain innovation and momentum, the ability to retain flexibility, and the ability to lead people through processes of problem-solving.

Applied teamwork and leadership require inspiration, imagination, improvisation and the synthesis of it all through to break-through to mastery and the achievement of quality and excellence.

 

Every word on that mind map can be a personally-relevant entry point for your own exploration and improvement.

Or you can take the wholistic approach and use the totality of it.

If you hung it on your wall and simply meditated, paying attention to your thoughts as your eyes wander, then when you get up, you may have been moved.

Nosce te ipsum.