Tag Archives: meditation

bipedal sentient Petri

bipedal sentient Petri

Long-time readers of BoyDownTheLane know that I am deeply interested in the capacities and capabilities of the human mind.

This is reflected in my e-book “Summon The Magic” and the fact that I retain and continue to delve into many of the ideas and texts it describes.  Certainly meditation is on the list.

 

Musical backdrop?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7zh0-T0efTY&list=RD7zh0-T0efTY#t=1 

 

I have had some experience with binaural-beats-guided audiated meditation, HoloSync to be more specific.  I have had some experience, indirectly and directly, with the ways in which the human mind can be used by its owner for healing purposes. When I was hospitalized, I had a personal experience with the power of will in that I literally willed a temporarily-frozen left lower extremity to lift itself off the hospital bed mattress. (It should be noted that that evolution took a concerted and repeated effort over the course of two and a half days.) The technique was suggested to me by my son, who had read and explored a bit of my e-book, and who had talked to a PGA pro who had had a similar medical incident. It’s funny how things come back around.  One of the doctors who cared for me observed that I had taught my son who in turn taught me. But I remember the excitement with which I demonstrated my “athletic feat” to doctors, nurses and therapists.

Readers know, too, that I like to share the meat and potatoes of my personal learning curves with the knowledge that somewhere out there is someone who will benefit. I try extra hard not to present myself as the expert, merely the bipedal sentient Petri dish into which learning and experience is inserted.  I learn something along the way, to be sure, but it takes a while for me to delve deeply into the book, video, topic, technique etc. and, like anyone else, sometimes I get distracted, demotivated, or something else becomes more of a priority. If I live to be 150, I might be able to finish the material I have assembled. And there are days in which some of the material is simply too dense to be consumed meaningfully.  Tomorrow, however….

And long-term readers know that I have danced with a long-term cardiac condition.  So when the brain meets up with the heart….

Recently I had the opportunity to meet a fellow who is a very unique being. He is a holistic psychiatrist. He researches, writes about, explores and makes movies about the capacity of the human brain to affect the body and the world it finds itself in. The movie I speak of is “The Joy of Sox: Weird Science and the Power of Intention”, a DVD copy of which he gifted me. Mr. and Mrs. Blogger are avid (in her case, diehard) Red Sox fans and baseball nuts. See http://www.thejoyofsoxmovie.com for more information.

The very unique being I speak of is a “board certified psychiatrist with the Pain Management Program at Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital in Boston, Dr. Leskowitz has an appointment with the Department of Psychiatry of Harvard Medical School, directs the hospital’s Integrative Medicine Task Force, and has several conferences on the topic of Complementary and Alternative Medicine in Rehabilitation. He edited a recent text of the same name (Churchill Livingstone, 2003), and has written and lectured widely on the field of energy medicine. His September 2005 Op-Ed in the Boston Globe, “Can Weird Science Save the Sox?” started the process that culminated in The Joy of Sox. Read more about Rick and his work in alternative medicine at his website www.EnergyMedicine101.com.”

Here is his article on The Role of Mindfullness, Meditation and Prayer after Brain Injury .

He is a member of The Sports Energy Group.

Here is an interview he did on the use of energy psychology and the alleviation of pain.

For $75, you can get a copy of the 200+ page book he edited in 2009 entitled “Transpersonal Hypnosis: Gateway to Body, Mind and Spirit”. Go here to bookdepository.com.  The book presents “a multidimensional, energy-based view of human awareness that integrates disparate biological, psychological, and spiritual therapeutic techniques. Each of the chapters – all from world-renowned contributors – includes both a historical overview and the theory behind the development of each technique. The authors emphasize experimental studies that examine the validity of using hypnotically accessed transpersonal states of consciousness to heal the body, mind, and spirit. Several clinical vignettes highlight the types of medical and psychological symptoms responsive to these approaches. The emerging field of spiritually-influenced treatments is transforming the practice of medicine.”

This link ( http://www.healingisfreedom.com/science/autoimmune-depression-10-science-based-strategies-feel-better-fast/ ), useful in many ways, has a section in which Dr. Leskowitz explains and introduces “tapping”, a technique employed by athletes and others. There’s a demo video at the link.

Here are two more links on tapping:

http://www.thetappingsolution.com/blog/lissa-rankin-must-watch/ 

http://www.thetappingsolution.com/what-is-eft-tapping/ 

Here are two books recommended for reading for students who take a course on health psychology taught at Brandeis:

Richard O. Straub (2014) Health Psychology: A Biopsychosocial Approach, 4th edition. New York: Worth Publishers ISBN: 978-1-4641-0937-9

Robert M. Sapolsky (2004) Why Zebras Don’t Get Ulcers, 3rd edition, Holt Paperbacks, New York; ISBN-13: 978-0805073690

The Harvard Medical School newsletter “Healthbeat” has an issue devoted to  anxiety and physical illness.

The world-famous Lown Institute ( http://lowninstitute.org ) is just down the street from where my old office was when I used to coordinate satellite TV-based continuing medical education in the fields of pediatrics and orthopedics. (The start-up venture went bust, but the boy born upstairs at the old Lying-In Institute at Brigham and Women’s just got named the Northeast Sales Manager for a new West Coast golf apparel chain.)  I urge you to read about the founder, Bernard Lown, the depth and breadth of the institute he founded, and more.  There is expertise there in health care, especially in cardiovascular medicine, that can’t be bested. There are publications, tools, news and more for you.

Dr. Lown maintains his own blog: https://bernardlown.wordpress.com.

To learn more about the intersection of behavior and cardiovascular health, go here: https://www.questia.com/library/3640527/handbook-of-psychology-and-health-cardiovascular.

Lown himself as an e-book on biological and psychological factors in disease. Further searching will allow you to find material on the topic of neuropsychiatric factors in cardiovascular disease, as well as info on Dr. Dean Ornish ( http://deanornish.com ).

 

Biological and Psychological Factors in Cardiovascular Disease – Google Books cardiovascular and psychiatric FAQ_Ornish_Program_8.19.14 cardiovascular and psychiatric FAQ_Ornish_Program_8.19.14  

 

FAQ_Ornish_Program_8.19.14 

 

 

 

 

DESIGN

Here’s the Brutally Honest Truth About the Creative Process

https://www.wired.com/2016/12/sunday-sketching-christoph-niemann-tells-brutal-truth-creative-process/ 

 

http://images.crateandbarrel.com/is/image/Crate/VivMartinis8SHF15/$web_product_hero$&/150817160027/viv-martini-glasses-set-of-eight.jpg

“What is an “eight-martini” result? 

“Well, this is an intelligence community in-house term for remote viewing data so good that it cracks everyone’s realities. So they have to go out and drink eight martinis to recover”.

– Ingo Swann

Eight martinis is a magazine dedicated to the pursuit and the application of the Art of Remote Viewing. Each Issue we present Remote Viewing sessions & examples, projects, news and theories from some of the leading Remote Viewing practitioners and thinkers.

The magazine currently comes in two formats; a FREE download as an Adobe pdf file and as a Full color printed and delivered to your door – magazine.

Eight martinis recently applied for and recieved an ISSN. (International Standard Serial Number). The ISSN is the standardized international code which allows the identification of any serial publication, including electronic serials, independently of its country of publication, of its language or alphabet, of its frequency, or medium.

eight martinis ISSN numbers are:

Eight martinis (Print) ISSN 2045-2462

Eight martinis (Online) ISSN 2045-2470

 

Issues, posts and more at the link:

http://www.eightmartinis.com 

 

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-8gCJRbg3Sw8/UPyZrrmUhoI/AAAAAAAAC4M/5iyZWe3zhZs/s400/%25E2%2580%259CThe%2Btwo%2Bmost%2Bimportant%2Bdays%2Bin%2Byour%2Blife%2Bare%2Bthe%2Bday%2Byou%2Bare%2Bborn%2Band%2Bthe%2Bday%2Byou%2Bfind%2Bout%2Bwhy.%25E2%2580%259D%2B-Mark%2BTwain2.jpg

THE AWAKENING – Quantum Mechanics of the Human Brain & Consciousness

[50 minutes]

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x2baCg8SHGM 

expect a quiz tomorrow

 

 

 

Source of featured entry masthead image: 

http://www.corespirit.com/scientists-discover-off-switch-human-consciousness-deep-within-brain/ 

Extra image from the same article:

http://www.corespirit.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/08/claustrum.jpg 

Little Pharm

Little Pharm

Overheard at the local pharmacy

Pharmacy Tech (burdened by a steady steam of drive-up customers and incoming phone calls announced by a repetitive and monotonous recorded robo-voice at a chronically-slow, understaffed and error-prone outlet of a  major retail chain of consumer health services and items that blanket the city and the region):  “It’s never ending…!” (perhaps in spite of or maybe due to the availability and use of smart phone apps and other social media tools)

Customer (me), standing patiently (I’m retired) in line at the untended and unstaffed cash register/inquiry desk: “It pays the bills.”

Pharmacist (and weekend wise-acre): “… and it creates high blood pressure!”

Customer (again): “Well, there’s always high blood pressure medication [with its numerous side-effects, acknowledged and unacknowledged] if meditation  doesn’t work.” 

BigPharm

http://www.dcvelocity.com/images/articles/2016/201608/20160808automation.jpg

Shipping: “To assure that the right medications get to patients right away, Toho Pharmaceutical built a distribution center that is so highly automated most of the products processed there are never touched by human hands” [DC Velocity][via http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2016/08/200pm-water-cooler-892016.html ]. “The automation is so extensive that the 130 warehouse workers employed at the facility never touch about 70 percent of the products processed there. This is due in large part to several automated storage and retrieval systems (AS/RS) and a small army of robotic pickers. Tying all of the automated systems together are five kilometers (three miles) of conveyors.”

‘hot date with God’

A  ‘hot date with God’: I was watching TV Tuesday night… I don’t watch it often but my wife and I both are very interested in the mini-series “Proof” starring the attractive and brilliant heart surgeon and the supremely-wealthy entrepeneur chasing down the facts on the entire arena of near-death-similar paranormal events, my wife’s interest being based on an orientation to “past lives”, reincarnation, etc., my interest from having had an NDE … when an ad came on that made me sit up and take notice.

High-end production quality and a focus on 9/11 on a mainstream media channel will do that, and the ad focused on the people who died on 9/11. And then it launched into a suggestion that we “walk” in remembrance, and I gave the TV set the finger.

My wife immediately made a silent note not to go near me for the next 12 hours, and I failed to make note of the advertiser or the charity/sponsor.  At the end of the TV show, I took my re-triggered anger back into my office and began to contemplate what action I could take. I’ve been unable to identify who the advertiser or sponsor were since then, though there have been annual events on the anniversary (which approaches) so I assume it is related and I wonder who organizes them and where the money goes.

Back in my man-cave of an office, I thought about praying for some sort of guidance. I thought about meditating. These would calm me down, at the very least.

My thoughts immediately turned to what I’d read before about unspeakable evil.  The names rattled through my synaptic tree: James Douglass, Thomas Merton, JFK, Gandhi…  I asked the modern-day Delphi oracle (the Internet search engine) to prompt me.

“Come, come, whoever you are. Wanderer, worshipper, lover of leaving. It doesn’t matter. Ours is not a caravan of despair. Come, even if you have broken your vows a thousand times. Come, yet again, come, come.”   Rumi

Centering Prayer is based on the wisdom saying of Jesus in the Sermon on the Mount : “ … when you pray, go to your inner room, close the door and pray to your Father in secret. And your Father, who sees in secret, will reward you” (Matthew 6:6).

Fr. Thomas Keating [author of many books but who wrote the introduction in Kundalini Energy and Christian Spirituality: A Pathway to Growth and Healing, by Philip St Romain, illus. Intro. by Thomas Keating (1991) ISBN 0-8245-1062-3 ] has jokingly mused that our practice of Centering Prayer is our ‘hot date with God’ as a way to encourage its relational aspect, and in response to people asking how to make a commitment to their practice.

Archives

https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/736x/d5/05/bc/d505bce6c571b4f4f11a0e6c75fd4549.jpg

Thomas Merton Quotes on Evil

  • There are crimes that no one would commit as an individual which he willingly and bravely commits when acting in the name of his society, because he has been (too easily) convinced that evil is entirely different when it is done “for the common good.” As an example, one might point to the way in which racial hatreds and even persecution are admitted by people who consider themselves, and perhaps in some sense are, kind, tolerant, civilized and even humane. But they have acquired a special deformity of conscience as a result of their identification with their group, their immersion in their particular society.
  • Thomas Merton Quotes from YummyQuotes.com

https://mertonfellowshipireland.wordpress.com/wp-content/themes/pub/pilcrow/images/headers/pattern.jpg?m=1391151917g

Source of image:

https://mertonfellowshipireland.wordpress.com/

Martin Luther King, Jr., famously stated, “He who passively accepts evil is as much involved in it as he who helps to perpetrate it. He who accepts evil without protesting against it is really cooperating with it.” Dr. King also said, “‎History will have to record that the greatest tragedy of this period of social transition was not the strident clamor of the bad people, but the appalling silence of the good people.”

Dietrich Bonhoeffer likewise would agree that this is an eyes-wide-open, deep moral problem. Said Bonhoeffer, “Silence in the face of evil is itself evil: God will not hold us guiltless. Not to speak is to speak. Not to act is to act.”

Silence Is Blasphemy

http://www.stjosephsshop.com/_images/Circular%20meditation%20glass.jpg

I read a few pages of P.M.H. Atwater’s book on near-death experiences; pages 43-48 offers up the story of Barney Clark, the first recipient of an artificial heart transplant, followed by the tales of a surgeon who treated dozens of victims from the Vietnamese battle scenario in Hue, Saul’s moment on the road to Damascus, other transformative events to a wide range of people, that of Robert Carter III of Nomini Hall Plantation in Virginia, that of the Northumbrian Drythelm as recorded by the Venerable Bede in the 8th century, the experience of JZ Knight/Ramtha, and others.

http://www.stjosephsshop.com/_images/Circular%20meditation%20glass.jpg

Among the psychological difficulties associated with intensive spiritual practice we find “Kundalini awakening”, “a complex physio-psychospiritual transformative process described in the yogic tradition”.[46] Researchers in the fields of Transpersonal psychology,[47] and Near-death studies[48][49] have described a complex pattern of sensory, motor, mental and affective symptoms associated with the concept of Kundalini, sometimes called the Kundalini syndrome.[50]

The references are to
^
Y. Kason, Farther Shores, Exploring How Near-Death, Kundalini and Mystical Experiences Can Transform Ordinary Lives, iUniverse (2000)

and

Greyson B. Near-death experiences and the physio-kundalini syndrome. Journal of Religion and Health. 1993 Dec;32(4):277-90. PMID 24271550

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kundalini

http://www.catholica.com.au/specials/MertonSpirituality/images/MertonQuote05_600x155.jpg

Source: http://www.catholica.com.au/specials/MertonSpirituality/005_ms_print.php

I ordered a copy of “Kundalini Energy & Christian Spirituality: a Pathway to Growth”.

http://dissidentvoice.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/mail.google.com_.jpg

The 70th Anniversary of the Bombing of Nagasaki

Unwelcome Truths for Church and State

by Gary G. Kohls / August 4th, 2015

70 years ago (August 9, 1945) an all-Christian bomber crew dropped a plutonium bomb over Nagasaki City, Japan, instantly vaporizing, incinerating or otherwise annihilating tens of thousands of innocent civilians, a disproportionately large number of them Japanese Christians. The explosion mortally wounded uncountable thousands of other victims who succumbed to the blast, the intense heat and/or the radiation.

[snip]

August 1, 1945 was the earliest deployment date for the Japanese bombing missions, and the Target Committee in Washington, D.C. had already developed a list of relatively un-damaged Japanese cities that were to be excluded from the conventional USAAF (US Army Air Force) fire-bombing campaigns (that, during the first half of 1945, had used napalm to burn to the ground over 60 essentially defenseless Japanese cities).

The list of protected cities included Hiroshima, Niigata, Kokura, Kyoto and Nagasaki. Those five cities were to be off-limits to the terror bombings that the other cities were being subjected to. They were to be preserved as potential targets for the new “gimmick” weapon that had been researched and developed in labs and manufacturing plants all across America over the several years since the Manhattan Project had begun.

Ironically, prior to August 6 and 9, the residents of those five cities considered themselves lucky for not having been bombed as had the other large cities. Little did the residents of Hiroshima and Nagasaki know that they were only being temporarily spared from an even worse carnage in an experiment with a new weapon that could cause the mass destruction of entire cities that were populated with hundreds of thousands of live human guinea pigs.

[snip]

At 11:02 am, during Thursday morning mass, hundreds of Nagasaki Christians were boiled, evaporated, carbonized or otherwise disappeared in a scorching, radioactive fireball that exploded 500 meters above the cathedral. The black rain that soon came down from the mushroom cloud contained the mingled cellular remains of many Nagasaki Shintoists, Buddhists and Christians. The theological implications of Nagasaki’s Black Rain surely should boggle the minds of theologians of all denominations.

The Nagasaki Christian Body Count

Most Nagasaki Christians did not survive the blast. 6,000 of them died instantly, including all who were at confession that morning. Of the 12,000 church members, 8,500 of them eventually died as a result of the bomb. Many of the others were seriously sickened with a highly lethal entirely new disease: radiation sickness.

Three orders of nuns and a Christian girl’s school nearby disappeared into black smoke or became chunks of charcoal. Tens of thousands of other innocent, non-Christian non-combatants also died instantly, and many more were mortally or incurably wounded. Some of the victim’s progeny are still suffering from the trans-generational malignancies and immune deficiencies caused by the deadly plutonium and other radioactive isotopes produced by the bomb.

And here is one of the most important ironic points of this article: What the Japanese Imperial government could not do in 250 years of persecution (i.e., to destroy Japanese Christianity) American Christians did in mere seconds.

[snip]

Years ago I saw an unpublished Veteran’s Administration study that showed that, whereas most Vietnam War-era soldiers were active members of Christian churches before they went off to war, if they came home with PTSD, the percentage returning to their faith community approached zero. Daniel Hallock’s sobering message above helps explain why that is so.

Therefore the church – at least by its silence on the issue of war – seems to be promoting homicidal violence, contrary to the ethical teachings of Jesus, by failing to teach what the primitive church understood was one of the core teachings of Jesus, who said, in effect, that “violence is forbidden for those who wish to follow me”.

Therefore, by refraining from warning their adolescent members about the faith- and soul-destroying realities of war, the church is directly undermining the “retention” strategies in which all churches engage. The hidden history of Nagasaki has valuable lessons for American Christianity.

 

 

 

http://themindunleashed.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/benjamin_fulford_3.jpg

Finally, I wandered over to the mind unleashed.org where the-whistle-blower-that-everyone-is-soon-to-know caught my attention and answered the question “Who Is Benjamin Fulford?” and it lead me to this:

http://geopolitics.co/vital-issues/ben-fulford/4460-2/

I don’t what to make of this. On one hand, it’s “above my pay grade” but appears to be comfortably within the grasp of Fulford’s. On the other hand, it appears to be artfully crafted in its selction of text and prose, saying a lot, crafting a tale that is plausible, yet leaving significant gaps in substantative proof or at least evidence. Once associated with Forbes, which described itself as a “capitalist tool”, we are told Fulford is an unknown, but not to search engines, where he appears to have made appearances around the globe with a wide number of people who would readily be described as on the outer rings of the conspircy theory world.

Go ahead and read “The Real Reson Behind the 9/11 Terror…”  and see what you think.

Scan these as well:

https://deusnexus.wordpress.com/2014/04/29/fulford-digs-hole-deeper/

http://hipknowsys.blogspot.com.au/2015/03/benjamin-fulford-march-23-2015.html

http://goldenageofgaia.com/2011/09/17/david-wilcocks-exclusive-interview-with-benjamin-fulford/ [This one notes Fulford’s sources as saying “the earthquakes that occurred in Colorado and the Washington DC area, surrounding August 22nd and 23rd, were, in fact, apparently nuclear strikes against underground military facilities.”]

http://sitsshow.blogspot.com/2015/06/benjamin-fulford-june-22nd-2015-bush.html

http://rense.com/Datapages/fulfdat.htm [How deep you want to go?]

When you have run out your own personal string of online inquiry, watch for a report coming out in two days from Wayne Madsen Reports and be sure to get  a hot date with God.

 

wasn’t that special?

Well, wasn’t that special?

I took a week off because suddenly things were afoot.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zi3i-HqDNFI

 

Grexit lurked in the wings, things were being banned (with the help of death threats), and the debate about Jade Helm went silent (getting people to respond to the scenario laid out by the lady in those podcasts was like pulling legs off the multi-legged thing running around in the bottom of the tub… first you have to catch it, and then pin it down), and major off-‘net events loomed large.

[Wouldn’t it be nice if we could ban dual citizenships, major political influence by groups that represent less than 5% of the population, dum-dum bullets, and social engineering?] 

I had to accomplish the medical pivot that had been put in motion. I’d changed PCP’s and medical groups and, having arranged the transfer of medical records, all the first visits with multiple providers (and their required lab tests) were beginning to queue up like morning flights out of Logan.  I have succeeded in getting four done, with nine more in the wings. During one of those visits, I encountered the early July double issue edition of Time in the waiting room. “The answer issue” it was called, and it was a model in crunching data into meaningless mindless info-graphic crap fit for the few moments you can find waiting for your medical provider to call your name.

One of those medical visits was a long-overdue re-evaluation by  a physical therapist. Results are still pending, but the first phase is already underway: more routine walking and light exercise with ankle weights.  Being taught a series of dynamic stretching exercises comes next week. Vitamin D and calcium dosing is underway. Is this PMR or simply de-conditioning post-procedure? The tapering of prednisone continues. Cardiology comes into focus next week as well. One echo has been done and the one with contrast scheduled.

Having beaten the reaper several times at a cost of one million from the insurance company, I am not  going to back-slide and I am squeezing and pushing as hard as I can. I expect also to be able to incorporate formal mindfulness meditation and healing visualization regimens.

The mailman brought the DVD “Kill The Messenger” starring Jeremy Renner; my wife gave me the DVD by Dr. Wayne Dyer “I Can See Clearly Now” which will come into focus shortly, and four books from Barnes & Noble: “Weaponizing Maps”, “A Government of Wolves” and “Battlefield America” by John Whitehead, and Sibel Edmonds’ novel “The Lone Gladio”, which was noted on James Corbett’s NWO reading list ( https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OEwFCd3L6HA ).

Stacked on top of all that was Peter Levenda’s “The Hitler Legacy” which looks incredibly interesting and also incredibly scary. My summer viewing and reading menu is filling in.

The week started off with the question of how the arrival of house guests was going to sync with my seven-year-old grandson’s birthday party but it worked out perfectly; we got to go see him discover the bike we bought him in the garage, as well as the junior custom low-weighted tractor his dad picked up in used but excellent condition in mid-state New York (complete with lawn-mowing and snow-plowing attachments and a dump-trailer his other grand-dad built him to hook on to it).  He backed it out of the garage and piloted it through the gap in the shrubs like a pro; we turned south to meet my sister and her husband arriving from over the mountain.

Three days with them trading tales of our upbringing, our parents, and the locations we were raised in, were spread among three nights out at restaurants. It was an extended OldFarts Tertulliana. The six-year Navy veteran with a top secret radioman’s rating whose term of duty got extended a little longer during the Cuban Missile crisis said we were going to have a civil war within a year. Three major revelations about my father came with those tales, and they were not pretty. They came as no great surprise, but were still startling and disconcerting. The man was more of a monster than I ever thought and the revelations confirmed my suspicions about a range of other topics. Well, wasn’t that special?  My father twice disowned me (to what purpose? separating me from his vast non-existent fortune? putting distance between me and the mis-perceived weighty hauteur of his lineage?).  I’ve just now finally returned the favor.  Now that he has left us— along with our brother— , the compartmentalization within the family has begun to break down and reveal more and more, and the healing continues.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7SvDzaJQXY8

After they left, the grandson and his kid sister came by to stay over for another Kindertotten Tertulliana.  I hooked up my keyboard synthesizer to the GarageBand in my Mac and they tickled the ivories for about 15 minutes, then played for a while, then watched TV and went to bed.

After Cheerios over “Jesse” in the morning, they went back home with their nana so I could finish up days worth of de-discombobulating maintenance.

But the keyboard remains plugged in.

Summertime

In a move not unlike cleaning off my desk before a long holiday weekend, I’m going to lump a bunch of seemingly-disconnected mini-entries that are relevant to recent posts and past themes. They and their predecessors will still be here for your consumption over the long, hot summer.  May yours be safe, relaxing, healthy and productive.

 

You’ve probably become aware of the importance of the discipline of the harmony of spirit in my thinking and in my life.  Unable to “take it to the tatami”, I’ve at least been able to take it to heart and mind and learn more about it applies to everyday life. One of the better writers and practitioners in the field has two books, both of which fall into the bibliography for the e-book on how to use your mind. Thus it is with little surprise that I find her work presented by Jeff at his searchofpeace web site, and I’m going to post that link and let it serve as the first offering here:

http://www.searchofpeace.com/blog/2015/07/01/aikido-the-practice-of-freedom/#more-614 

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JnA8GUtXpXY 

The Extended Mind: Recent Experimental Evidence

A GoogleTech talk (1:37:42) by Rupert Sheldrake

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http://noetic.org 

http://noetic.org/sites/default/files/uploads/files/IONS-Roadmap2Future.pdf 

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http://www.thehealersjournal.com/dna-activation-sound-healing/

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In the early 1990s, IONS posited a question in the midst of remarkably rapid increases in autoimmune and cancer disease research. As the steward of decades of consciousness science research, it asked, “Are we not actually hardwired to heal?” In other words, while we’re placing the lens of science on the healing response, shouldn’t we also examine the overlooked possibility of a holistic, internal self-healing system? Until then, research had focused on eradicating disease, zeroing in on separate physiological functions such as the immune and endocrine systems. On the street, a continental divide separated conventional science from the public’s acceptance of a mind-body healing connection. No widely accessible forums, neither books, television, nor mainstream media, fostered such awareness.

At the same time, the emerging field of psychoneuroimmunology—the study of the connection between the mind/brain and immune system—was too new and undersupported to help bridge the divide. IONS sought to lay the groundwork for a future medical model based on the whole human experience – the interconnection of consciousness and the body comprising a single “ecosystem” of health and wellness.

The Studies

Throughout the previous decade, IONS had collaborated on and assembled dozens of studies on spontaneous remission, placebo affects, and multiple personalities, a collection that identified some of the most compelling evidence of a mind-body healing connection. Then-Vice President for Research Brendan O’Regan initiated an exhaustive review of literature in these three areas. The review identified frontier researchers from around the world, including, among others

• George Solomon – Correlations between stress, personality, emotions, and outlook on autoimmune disease progression

• Robert Ader – Breakdowns in the immune system response of rats subjected to profound stress

• Norman Cousins – The “will to live” as placebo-induced recovery and “laughter therapy,” both demonstrating emotions influence on healing.

• Margaret Kemeny – Seminal work on Type C – or cancer prone – personality

• Jamie Pennebaker – Correlation between journaling, a stress-reducing form of emotional expression, and immune system activity

• Candice Pert – The body’s ability to produce its own “mood-altering” drugs, called neuropeptides, in response to pain, stress.

Outcomes/Impacts

IONS’ “The Heart of Healing” study produced volumes of research data and anecdotes, which captured the collective imaginations of mass media and medical science at a time when autoimmune diseases and cancer dominated the international psyche. In October 1993 it became a six-hour Turner Broadcasting documentary, delivering the topic of mind-body healing to millions of living rooms. Cox News Service predicted it would be “the most taped, begged, borrowed and shared TV series of the year.” Along with an illustrated hardcover book, “The Heart of Healing” explored how culture informs our ideas about the nature of healing, presented leading-edge research on the mind-body relationship, and expanded views of human healing potential. At the same time, IONS research was also used in Healing and the Mind, Bill Moyers’ pivotal television series, while O’Regan’s work with Caryle Hirshberg and Marc Ian Barasch produced the milestone book, Remarkable Recovery. The New York Times called it “an alluring work of hopeful nonfiction.” Shortly thereafter, Andrew Weil went on to publish Spontaneous Healing: How to Discover and Enhance Your Body’s Natural Ability to Maintain and Heal Itself – categorized by Amazon.com as a mass-market book.

These works went on to inspire others, generating a measurable shift in public behaviors towards mind-body medicine. That field of research swelled, and the National Institutes of Health established the Office of Alternative Medicine. In1997 total visits to alternative medicine practitioners increased 47 percent from 1990, exceeding total visits to all U.S. primary care physicians. (JAMA) And by 2009, 38 percent of American adults (and 12 percent of children) were turning to meditation, hypnosis, group support, biofeedback, mental imaging, and simple positive thinking to maintain health and cure illness. (NIH)

Most remarkably, “The Heart of Healing” project assembled the fields of psychology, biology, immunology, psychiatry, and anthropology to identify a healing system that later emerged as the field of psychoneuroimmunology (PNI). While some were initially skeptical, the United States Public Health Service funded hundreds of research grants in the field of PNI. In 1985, Medline, the worlds’ largest medical database, cited no PNI listings but posted more than 100 between 1995 and 1997. New research is still being carried out, and there are several academic journals devoted to PNI.

Conclusion

Today we now know that there are many tools to help stimulate the healing response, and mind-body medicine research is keeping up the pace. For example, the department of defense is accelerating studies on alternative practices in wound healing. Integral practice programs are becoming more commonplace. Stress has become one of the fastest-growing areas of medical research. And survivorship programs that look beyond physical dynamics are sprouting up in major medical programs, including Sloan Kettering and Columbia. As these programs unfold, IONS continues to push the envelope in healing-systems research, looking for more tools and technologies that support human resilience.

http://noetic.org/about/case-studies/heart-healing 

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“Civilized” Medicine Dismisses Mind/Soul

For thousands of years, traditional, indigenous, and Eastern medical traditions integrated body, mind, and spirit as a whole healing system. When modern science emerged in the 17th century, it broke down the human experience into measurable components it could label, enshrining the physical body as a biological machine in what became the new model of “Western medicine.” Because the ethereal entity of the mind could only be considered, not recorded, it was associated with that inexplicable, intangible human essence called the soul. When Rene Descartes wanted to pursue his theories of a unitary mind/body system, Church officials limited him to the study of the physical world, instructing him to leave the soul to them. A few centuries after that, germ theory broke down the biological sciences even further, giving the immune system complete autonomy as a healing system.

For increasing numbers of healthcare consumers and professionals alike, the biomedical model has failed to offer a system for understanding the fullness of the lived experience. By the time the Institute of Noetic Sciences was founded in 1973, these frustrations had intensified the call for new research into a medical model that engaged the possibility of human transcendence in the face of illness and disease. The stage was thus set for “consciousness science” to come forward.

Consciousness Science Pushes for Mind-Body Evidence

The first attempts by modern medicine to reunite the mind and body in the laboratory occurred in the 1950s. In response to what a few scientists thought was a misunderstanding that the mind could manifest somatic (cell-based, biological) symptoms during psychological distress, the study of “psychosomatic medicine” was born (Alexander, 1950; Engel, 1977; Salk, 1962; Selye, 1976; Solomon & Moos, 1964; Wolf & Goddell, 1968).

The Institute of Noetic Sciences used this mind-body breakthrough as an invitation to introduce consciousness science into the field of medical research, and began studying the miraculous healings at Lourdes, France, and in Medjugorje, in the former Yugoslavia. It went on to collect evidence of “spontaneous” remission and regression of illnesses from as far back as 1846 – the first such recorded incident – until it had more than 3500 accounts from 830 medical journals in more than twenty languages.

By the 1980s, the study of psychosomatic medicine had revealed new sets of observations that cognitive processes, neurobiology, and the immune system were functionally integrated. IONS seized this “evidence-based” opportunity to push harder for scientific evidence; it initiated a program of research called the Inner Mechanisms of the Healing Response. Under the leadership of Brendan O’Regan, IONS’ then vice-president of research, this program identified formal research on the link between consciousness and health, which included the idea that consciousness-related factors (cognitive and emotional) might play a role in both wellness and the healing of disease. These endeavors helped give rise to a new formal medical discipline called psychoneuroimmunology (PNI) (Ader, 1981; Rogers, Dubey, & Reich, 1979, Sklar & Anisman, 1979; Solomon and Amkraut, 1981, Stein et al., 1976).

PNI is the study of the body’s innate healing abilities. It is based on the premise that multiple factors – including psychological, emotional, genetic, endocrine, nervous and immune – affect immune functioning and hence resistance to disease. In other words, medical science was beginning to find its way back to the origins of health and healing: the connection of mind and body.

IONS Ushers Psychoneuroimmunology into Post-Modern Era

Throughout the 1980s, studies continued to reveal evidence to support the PNI premise. IONS bolstered this momentum in 1985 when it sponsored the first international workshop on neuroimmunomodulation (Pardes), where a new generation of scientists met to explore how the brain and immune system communicate with each other. IONS provided additional grants to support four subsequent meetings, which later shaped the first PNI professional society (Rabin, Laudenslager): 1) investigation into the relationship between hypnosis and aspects of the immune response (Locke, Olness); 2) conditioning and the immune response (Ader); 3) the role of a cognitive intervention in the immune responses of colon cancer patients (Levy); and 4) immune system changes in both healer and healee during non-contact therapeutic touch.

By the 1990s, the struggle was beginning to pay off: PNI research had discovered the anatomical link between the central nervous system and the immune system, and provided evidence that immune reactions could be learned and that they influenced behavior. PNI research then began concentrating on biological signaling – neurotransmitters and hormones talking to immune cell receptors. Once PNI began to delve into the cellular and molecular mechanisms where scientists could measure receptors and “second messenger” effects, even stalwart skeptical immunologists began to accept it.

The work of IONS coincided with and even validated this benchmark of acceptance with a six-hour television series called “The Heart of Healing,” produced by Turner Broadcasting. It provided an international audience of healthcare consumers with new language and a new narrative to assimilate mind-body perspectives and approaches into their understanding of wellness.

PNI’s full break into the medical mainstream occurred in the late 90s when science repeatedly demonstrated the health implications of stress on the immune system and published its results in established medical journals – ending the decade when stress became a household word and almost anyone paying attention knew about its connection to illness.

IONS’ Pivotal Role in a New Field of Study

Despite early skepticism and funding shortages, IONS’ bold early work exploring the role of consciousness in healing helped the mainstream medical community accept PNI as an established and credible medical science. The Institute’s persistence led to scientific evidence of a mind-body connection and a return to the wisdom of the holistic human experience. While PNI has a long way to go to establish acceptance and widespread support among all branches of the medical community and among health care consumers, it has ushered in a post-modern era of scientific research. PNI research continues at many major medical institutions around the world, where medical practices based on PNI research – including meditation, hypnosis, and imagery – are being offered as standard treatment protocols.

http://noetic.org/about/case-studies/mind-body 

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m8rRzTtP7Tc 

How Meditation Can Reshape Our Brains

“It’s more like “body-mind plasticity” than “neuroplasticity” because it’s not just the brain. The body is a holistic system.

There are about 4 input channels: stomach e.g. for recycling RNA, small intestine e.g. for absorbing water-based nutrition, the colon e.g. for fermentation of solid waste by gut bacteria, and the lungs e.g. for the absorption of airborne nutrition. There are a couple of output channels: solid waste elimination, liquid waste elimination, skin (sweat), and the lungs.”

&&

Change Your Mind, Change Your Life

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=upNONoxskiw 

Bodhin Kjolhede weaves metaphor and allegory together to explain the importance of meditation. He will deliver several tangible benefits of meditation that would go unrealized without personal experience.

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How mindfulness meditation redefines pain, happiness & satisfaction

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JVwLjC5etEQ 

This talk was given at a local TEDx event, produced independently of the TED Conferences. Dr. Kasim Al-Mashat teaches and presents on the use of mindfulness for creating healing, transformation, and peace. He is passionate about enhancing people’s sense of joy, authenticity, and presence. Kasim also teaches and speaks about the use of laughter and laughter yoga for improving wellness.

Kasim is a therapist with interest in fostering positive change in mental health both inside and outside the therapy room. He recently returned from completing a challenging six-month meditation retreat in silence, in a forest monastery in South East Asia.

&&

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LWQfe__fNbs 

Is There Scientific Proof We Can Heal Ourselves?

Lissa Rankin, MD explores the scientific literature, reviewing case studies of spontaneous remission, as well as placebo and nocebo effect data, to prove that our thoughts powerfully affect our physiology when we believe we can get well.

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Eric Barker, on “How To Learn a New Skill Quickly” 

via

http://dangerousintersection.org 

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http://www.bakadesuyo.com/2015/02/being-the-best-at-anything/ 

http://www.bakadesuyo.com 

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http://www.bakadesuyo.com/2014/02/most-successful-people/ 

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You’ve been able to see that you can find numerous similar and likely repetitive or overlapping videos.  Take that as far as you want to go; stop when you’ve had enough. Return later for review, or further exploration.

With this final exception:

Mental Toughness

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LCPgvTRftZg 

Dr. Sean Richardson takes lessons learned from the professional athlete’s locker room to provide an overview of the subtleties of human brain & behaviour function to facilitate overcoming the normal & predictable human barriers to success.

See his web site here: http://drseanr.com

If you’ve gotten to this point, then you are, like a passenger in my taxicab, at your destination. This is your stop. Explore this fellow’s web site, watch his introductory video, look into his blog, check out his coaching services (hey, a $49 online starter session to look at and shape your goal package is a great deal), and there is more.

Are there others like this guy?  Oh, to be sure.

There is an entire industry in “coaching”, along with books, text books, degree programs, certification, etc.  And there are a lot of charlatans. But check out this guy’s credentials. He’s been there and done it. He has a doctorate in the psychology of excellence. He’s delivered results at the professional level.

If you can find quickly someone better than this guy….

something beyond

Proof is a TV show that is perhaps as controversial as several conspiracy theories, but I can assure you that the question of “is there something beyond death?” is a frequent topic in Western medical circles. I was asked specifically after my own near-death experience (nothing to see here, the docs were pros and quick about it). Perhaps I didn’t need to have one; my passport had already been stamped. One of the doctors on the case had a parallel experience at the same time outside the hospital and there was a calendar page from 12/16/07 saved as a bit of memorabilia now lost to the ages, unlike the memory or the experience. But, to borrow a phrase from the late great Ed Encho, I digress…. 

It is said that you don’t begin to inquire or believe until you have had your own experience; such experience can be mimicked, simulated or even actuated with entheogenic drugs. 

Epiphany is as good a word as any, but there is a broad range of related words, experiences or explanations. Altered, or higher, states of consciousness have been explored for a very long time by a great many people. I once owned a book about 251 ways to enter into an altered state of consciousness. 

I’ve noted that I’ve had an OBE, an epiphany and a theophany.  They are part and parcel of my own inquiries, an example of Eric Booth’s spectrum of curiosity, interest, admiration, concern, connection, resonance and change. Having an OBE probably helped set me on my course of inquiry that has brought me to this point. The three parallel experiences certainly changed me, and make things resonate within.

The OBE was one I shared with the woman who became my wife and the mother of my two children. It made some sense when I discovered and read Mark Gaffney’s book on the initiatory teachings of ther Last Supper (he’s the fellow who wrote about the mystery plane of 9/11 too) and when I read of Marghanita Laski’s research into rhythm and movement in Murphy’s book “In The Zone”, so it would seem that the rhythm and movement we imparted into and through our spinal/kundalini systems, aligned as they were, took us to a different place. As Gaffney points out, perhaps the preacher and his first disciple experienced the same thing. And then decades later there is Bentov’s book “Stalking The Wild Pendulum” which is an exploration of how sound and electrical impulse travel through the aorta and its relationship to kundalini, something quite similar to the effects of binaural-beat brain-wave meditation, which I did at length in the months prior to the events of December 2007. 

The epiphany was perhaps similarly a doorway that had been created by the warmth on my spine of the sun-bathed granite shelving of coastal Maine as I meditated quietly listening to the rhythmic waves of the sea on that shoreline. I slipped through that door left slightly ajar like a silent cat discovering a new way.  It was an extended cosmic moment that cannot be eexplained, only experienced. I’ve had briefer almost nearly instantaneous glimpses since then; some might think them akin to flashbacks.  But once you’ve been there, as it says, they can never take that away from you. 

The theophany occured when my second-born child was two and in the full throes of a middle-of-the-night colicky crankiness that, if you’re a parent, you’ve probably experienced. The adults are beyond themselves with lack of sleep and fatigue from work, and there’s a child needing attention and cradling and more.  As you near the end of your rope, there are exasperations that could lead to gross parental mis-step and, crammed up into the corner of a dormer roof in the nursery where quite literally no one else could fit, I felt the grip of a hand on my shoulder taking no uncertain posession of my attention and my intent with a message that was transmitted mysteriously but unequivocally and which told me to be gentle with one for whom He had great things in store.  Say what you will, but the child was calmed instantly into peaceful sleep, as was the parent.  If you’ve read the e-book, you know something of what happened in the child’s life. She’s approaching 40 and has her own children and classrooms full of other kids. 

Now, in the past, I’d mentioned Eben Alexander’s book highly-controversial book, but such inquiry has been with us since the days of Kubler-Ross and others.  The TV show is nice in that it’s a light introduction to the concepts and features interesting characters, but if you want to study along at home, I’d recommend the following:

http://annjauregui.com/imgs/bookcover-nautilus.jpg

http://www.beyondword.com/product/Epiphanies-01679 [The bibliography and suggested reading at the back of this book is stunning.]

http://annjauregui.com/ 

55-minute audio interview:

http://www.omniartsalon.com/?s=Ann+Jauregui 

Quotes from the book:

“Mind-matter-time, thought to be distinct, are so intertwined that they might be better off thought of as aspects of one another, of something alive.”

“Even while tales of revelation are cornerstones of the world’s great religions, we formalize them as myth and keep our transcendent moments secret from each other and from ourselves, so as not to appear fatuous or flat-out crazy.”

“… revelation, transcendent and transforming, is often dangerous. It is an elevator-stomach moment, a stop-everything.”

“Disabled people must concentrate on areas in which they can compete with anyone.”

“Post-traumatic stress or PTSD is a relatively new diagnostic label first coined to describe the long-lasting thoughts and mood disturbances reported by veterans of the Vietnam war. The diagnosis has since been expanded to describe persistent states of distress reported by adults or children who’ve been confronted by death, violence, or serious injury.”

“In his best-selling book Healing words, the power of prayer in the practice of medicine, the physician and author Larry Dossey writes sternly about silent prayer, unconscious prayer, prayers are answered before they are made. He talks about experimental trials with ‘distant intentionality’ …..”

http://www.intechopen.com/source/html/40014/media/image2.jpeg

Source of image: http://www.intechopen.com/books/complementary-therapies-for-the-contemporary-healthcare/distant-healing-by-the-supposed-vital-energy-scientific-bases [has a a downloadable chapter]

 

 

http://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/109557/extraordinary-knowing-by-elizabeth-lloyd-mayer-phd

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AClVSWvNsWw 

Here are five quotes from the book:

At the center of every account was the description of some radical extension of knowing, one that occupied body and soul, heart as well as mind. Now I began to reread with fresh eyes that vast body of recent research that explores knowing like that, knowing that emerges from beyond the intellect. The research comes from cognitive scientists, educators, neuroscientists, psychologists, and sociologists. None of it touches on knowing that’s apparently anomalous, but perhaps established research about these “peak moments” could help us start thinking about what happens at the other end of the spectrum.

 

During the subjects’ moments of deepest meditation and prayer, what stops firing were all the signals that tell us where to locate the boundaries that separate us from everything that isn’t us.

 

Human consciousness is able to extract information from physical aspects of its environment by some anomalous means that is independent of space and time.

 

Intuition is about recognizing internal impressions in an altered state of consciousness that simply doesn’t work in the same way as linear thinking.

 

… She could only access or extraordinary knowing by investing her work with personal meaning and connection.

 

Special attention might be paid to chapter 7 and the footnotes for that chapter that extend from ages 279 through to page 282.

 

 

 

https://exploringthemindofgod.files.wordpress.com/2013/11/consiousness.jpg?w=300&h=233 

Source of image: 

https://exploringthemindofgod.wordpress.com/consciousness-timeline/ 

 

 

http://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/296995/the-future-of-the-body-by-michael-murphy/

 

Approaching 800 pages in length, the entire book is a tour de force, superbly organized and footnoted, with an index and bibliography.  Danielle Prohom Olson describes it as an “exhaustive cross-cultural documentation of super-normal capacities (healing, telepathy, clairvoyance and feats of superhuman hearing, seeing and strength) demonstrated by yogis, Tibetan monks, indigenous shamans and high-level athletes….”.

I call your attention specifically to pages 195-230, as well as 112-116. After a discussion of involution and evolution, Murphy ends Chapter 7 with over four pages on the ideas that impede our understanding of metanormal development. 

Chapter 8 is about metanormal embodiment in legend, art and religious doctrine, Taoist legends about immortality, the “glorified body” in Christianity, and super-ordinary powers in cartoons, movies and science fiction. 

Chapter Nine delves into out-of-body experience, traveling clairvoyance, and dematerialization, as well as extraordinary conditions of energy and matter. 

Chapter Ten is devoted to post-mortem states and the afterlife. OBE’s are also covered on pages 112-116.

For more about Murphy, his archived research and works:

http://www.esalen.org/ctr/display/bio.cfm?ID=9 

http://www.esalen.org/ctr/scholarly-resources/database 

See also:

http://www.barnesandnoble.com/Irreducible Mind: Toward a Psychology for the 21st Century by Edward F. Kelly/ with CD [if you can afford it — I can’t]

 

 

There’s a necessary dying…Be ground. Be crumbled so wildflowers will come up where you are. You’ve been stony too many years. Try something different. Surrender.    -Rumi

http://www.umassmed.edu/zzz-archive/cfm_new_design/training/continuing-education/in-the-crucible-mindfulness-program-with-saki-santorelli/ 

Then there is this fellow:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?t=10&v=jE1j5Om7g0U 

[on the role of the posterior cingulate cortex in getting out of your own way][ten minutes]

http://www.umassmed.edu/cfm/research/

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/dr-judson-brewer/ his blog

http://www.umassmed.edu/cfm/about-us/people/meet-our-research-team/brewer-judson/videos/ 

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6J0fqswzxWM (20:03)

The Future of the Mind

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cCNQo135FAA (90:00)

Judson Brewer, Md, PhD presentation at the Center for Mindfulness in Medicine, Health Care, and Society, March 10, 2014. See the web page at http://www.umassmed.edu/cfm/Resources… for the slide presentation.

http://www.umassmed.edu/cfm/training/ 

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Scientists get first-ever visual glimpse into how new concepts form inside brain

time

Published time: June 10, 2015 18:55

Scientists have figured out how newly learned concepts form in the human brain by visualizing how new information gets filed. They say this is the first time science visually witnessed how and where specific objects are coded in the brain.

Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have managed to observe how different new knowledge is stored and how combinations of different pieces of this fresh information affect different parts of the brain. This is eventually used to tell the observer what the person is thinking about.

The accompanying research is published in the journal Human Brain Mapping.

University neuroscientist Marcel Just used the example of the 2013 discovery by the Smithsonian Institute of an entirely new species – an olinguito, which is a small South American carnivorous mammal. Those learning about the animal were able to immediately pickup new information for the first time, such as its habitat, diet, behaviour and so on.

Millions of people read the information about the olinguito and in doing so permanently changed their own brains,” Just explained.

“Our research happened to be examining this process precisely at that time in a laboratory setting. When people learned that the olinguito eats mainly fruit instead of meat, a region of their left inferior frontal gyrus—as well as several other areas—stored the new information according to its own code.”

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The team also learned that people store new knowledge and its bits in the same way, using “the same filing system,” in the same brain areas.

Just and PhD student and lead author Andrew Bauer then gathered 16 study participants and monitored their brain activity while teaching them new information about eight extinct species of animals. They observed the emergence of new concepts in their brains by using an MRI machine, as the hour-long ingestion of new information progressed.

Having already conducted prior research in the field of brain imaging, the team knew where certain bits of information would pop up, such as information about an animal’s habitat or its dietary habits. Each category lights up a different part of the brain.

As all new concepts had different “activation signatures,” the scientists were able to see with the help of a computer program, which concepts the participants were thinking about, virtually allowing them to read their brains.

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RT

@RT_com

Rich people will become immortal cyborgs in 200 years – historian

http://on.rt.com/c6ksjr

 

View image on Twitter

 

4:55 AM – 31 May 2015


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According to Just, “The activation signature of a concept is a composite of the different types of knowledge of the concept that a person has stored, and each type of knowledge is stored in its own characteristic set of regions.”

The team gained further insight into how the brain manages information. For example, new information does not eclipse something learned five minutes ago. Instead, “Each time we learn something, we permanently change our brains in a systematic way,” Bauer explains.

In conducting the research, Carnegie Mellon fused two prominent research areas at the university – one dealing with studying how brain architecture gives rise to complex behaviors; and one dealing with increasing the effectiveness of student learning.

Just and Bauer hope that knowing how the brain ingests new information could prove very useful to understanding the nature of better learning – what a student has problems with, or which bits of knowledge, which sink in better than others.

http://rt.com/news/266284-new-concepts-form-brain/ 

thinking, doing and being

food for thinking, doing and being

”Mastery of kitchen utensils does not guarantee creativity in cooking but, like the tools of any trade, they must be used with individual and even idiosyncratic vision to yield results.”

 

The July-August edition of Cook’s Illustrated arrived as I wrote this; it was not an act of serendipity because I subscribe to the magazine for its recipes, reviews of foostuffs and tools, great recipes, and outstanding cooking tips. It was an obvious act of synchronicity, given the title of this chapter and the selection of the image at the top that I’d already made.

Inside the magazine, ahead of the tool review, the kitchen notes, the ingredient notes, the blind taste test of balsamic vinegar, three pages on knife sharpeners, two (illustrated) pages on how to grill trout, the right and wrong ways to cook sausage, the ultimate method for char-grilling steaks, and two pages of illustrated quick tips, is Christopher Kimball’s “The Don’t List”.

Alas, folks, it’s not online.

If you call right now and ask issue #155, you’ll get closer to a mastery of kitchen utensils.

{* *}

In the past, you’d had the second chapter (the one about the brain) which I noted was probably outdated by the time it got to you. I was right.

“In a landmark study published last week in the journal Nature, scientists revealed the discovery of vessels that directly connect the brain to the lymphatic system. According to a EurekAlert press release, the discovery radically changes the current understanding of the brain’s role in responding to major neurological diseases, and opens up several amazing new areas of research.

Researchers at the University of Virginia School of Medicine discovered that the brain has a direct physical connection with the lymphatic system, which collects and removes toxins from the body. The doctors discovered peculiar vessels hidden in the meninges, or membranes covering the brain, in mice. They used an innovative dissection technique to locate the vessels, which they previously thought simply didn’t exist. Using live imaging, the scientists were able to demonstrate the function of the vessels as they interacted with the central nervous system.

The discovery raises a wide range of questions about the brain and the diseases that can affect it. Alzheimer’s disease, for example, is caused by the accumulation of large protein chunks in the brain. Scientists believe that these proteins accumulate because these lymphatic vessels have trouble removing them. The team said that the discovery also had implications for the understanding of many other neurological diseases including autism and multiple sclerosis.

According to Dr. Jonathan Kipnis, the study’s lead author and researcher at the University of Virginia’s Center for Brain Immunology and Glia, this is the first time lymphatic vessels have ever been identified. Previously, there was no mention of any such type of vessel in medical textbooks.

The amazing new discovery of the strange lymphatic vessels may very well shape the way we approach treating neurological diseases in the future, and will undoubtedly change our understanding of the brain’s role in regulating the various functions of the body for years to come.”

http://www.statecolumn.com/2015/06/your-brain-and-immune-system-are-linked-amazing-new-study-says-yes/

“… According to Dr. Jonathan Kipnis, the study’s lead author and researcher at the University of Virginia’s Center for Brain Immunology and Glia, this is the first time lymphatic vessels have ever been identified. Previously, there was no mention of any such type of vessel in medical textbooks.

The amazing new discovery of the strange lymphatic vessels may very well shape the way we approach treating neurological diseases in the future, and will undoubtedly change our understanding of the brain’s role in regulating the various functions of the body for years to come.

The chairman of UVA’s Department of Neuroscience, Kevin Lee, Ph.D., explained his reaction at first:

“I really did not believe there are structures in the body that we are not aware of. I thought the body was mapped,” he said. “I thought that these discoveries ended somewhere around the middle of the last century. But apparently they have not.”

When showed the results, he had just one sentence for the team:

“They’ll have to change the textbooks.”

Moving forward, knowing the brain has a direct connection with the immune system changes how researchers approach neurological conditions. They can now ask mechanical questions. If the disease has an immune component, the vessels should play a major role.

Treatments can be developed based on direct responses on the brain’s lymphatic system. While the shotgun approach to tackling neurological conditions will continue, teams can now approach diseases such as MS with an eye towards activating the brain’s immune system response.

It’s a hell of a discovery. Not only is it cool we are sitting in the middle of 2015 and still mapping our body’s internal structure, but it offers hope to people suffering from neurological diseases.

The study is in the June 1 issue of Nature.”

http://www.newsledge.com/brain-immune-system-16235 

 

 

 

But I’ll still give you the ninth chapter of the e-book Summon The Magic: How To Use Your Mind… (a collection of excerpts from some of the best books and sources on performance psychology, coaching, neuroscience, etc.) and which is entitled Food for Thinking, Doing and Being.

 

Tab K (Food for…)

 

It ranges across the topics of the performance triangle, will skills, homeostasis, change, the mind-body dialogue, thinking tools, the ACT triangle, decision-making, suggestion, auto-suggestion, attention, and meditation, among others.

It will get you closer to mastery of your performance. [What do you perform?]

The ninth chapter also crosses the threshold of the use of audio-assisted or audio-driven neditation through brain wave changes that can gently pull you into proper states for doing (beta), relaxation (alpha), problem-solving and thinking (theta), and rest/sleep/deep sleep (delta and deep delta).

Deeo sleep is where the body heals itself, where your neuroplasticity kicks in, where you can can begin to make changes in your body’s chemical engineering. It’s a subject I’m still exploring, so caveat emptor.

Some of the books noted in the bibliography are relevant. The first three are older, very good general introductions to the topic, the last two written by physicians.

The fourth (Thresholds of the Mind) can easily be found either as a used book, online, or e-book. It’s very very good and is written by the fellow who runs HoloSync ( https://www.centerpointe.com/v2/ ) which is a product I’ve used since about 2002 (it’s better than crack, said one psychopharmacologist); I’m now researching other options, since it’s pretty expensive.

Afterwards, You’re a Genius: Faith, Medicine and the Metaphysics of Healing, Chip Brown, Riverhead Books (Penguin Putnam), New York 1998.

Healing Beyond the Body: Medicine and the Infinite Reach of the Mind, Larry Dossey, M.D., Shambhala, Boston 2001. [A recognized leader in this field…]

Quantum Healing: Exploring the Frontiers of Mind/Body Medicine, Deepak Chopra, M.D., Bantam New Age Books, 1989.

Thresholds of the Mind: How HoloSync Audio Technology Can Change Your Life, by Bill Harris, Centrepointe Press, Beaverton, OR 2002. [The explanation of the science behind the use of audio tones to drive brain waves and create mental states for learning, creativity and more… , to balance right and left brain, and to provide very deep meditation and its benefits). This amazing system is highly recommended and is available through www.centrepointe.com .]

At the moment, I am also checking out BrainFM  (https://brain.fm ) and The Unexplainable Store (http://www.unexplainablestore.com ).

 

http://thirdeyeactivation.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/binaural-monaural-beats-isochronic-tones.jpg

We as individuals can master these tools to take control of our own lives; we can gradually introduce them — by modeling them, teaching them or even simply introducing them — to others.  

Perhaps then we can get to this point:

Lives filled with laughing,

and lives filled with weeping,

are both possible.

It is for the individual to decide which will be chosen.

Synchronization, coherence and life’s challenges

http://i.cdn.turner.com/dr/golf/www/release/sites/default/files/imagecache/node-gallery-display/gallery_images/Vijay-Singh-golf-clubs_0.jpg 

Trying to bring the world to a clear state of awareness

about the sources of inhumanity 

seems a bit like saying 

“You can win the The Claret Jug 

if you can hit the 1.68-inch wide, 1.20 ounce white dimpled ball

into 72 successive devilishly-entrapped holes

with any of these 14 Golf clubs 

fewer times than anyone else”

 

Both likely require multiple steps, some (and probably lots) of learning,  commitment, practice, time, and some awareness of your own ’hamartia’.

 

“Golf is a game to teach you about the messages from within, about the subtle voices of the body-mind. And once you understand them you can more clearly see your ‘hamartia,’ the ways in which your approach to the game [<YouTube link] reflects your entire life. Nowhere does a man go so naked.”

Michael Murphy (author of “Golf in the Kingdom”)

Now, I can hear people saying, “what in hell does playing golf have to do with stopping covert ops and hidden government, false flags, falsely-engendered wars, brutal dictatorship, surveillance, genocide, pedophilia, and Satanism?”

 

Nothing, and everything. 

 

There is a book I’ve read (and given away to someone who just came in second in his club member championship) entitled On The Sweet Spot: Effortless Action in Golf

It’s written by a clinical psychologist and lifelong golfer who conferred with a friend, a dying radiologist, who’d been conducting research on the human brain.

Publishers Weekly calls it “half sports coaching tome and half medical research”. 

The link at Barnes and Noble above says:

 

“… Keefe recognized that the feeling golfers and other athletes have of “being in the zone” is basically the same as a meditative state. And as a researcher with experience in brain chemistry, he went one step further: If we can figure out what’s happening in the brain at such times, he reasons, we can learn how to get into that “zone” instead of just waiting for it to happen. This is the Holy Grail of sport psychology — teaching the mind to get out of the way so the body can do the things it’s capable of doing. Keefe calls it the “effortless present,” when the body is acting of its own accord while the brain has little to do but watch.
All religions describe some kind of heightened awareness in their disciplines; Keefe explores whether such mystical experience is a fundamental aspect of our evolution, an integral part of what makes us human and keeps us from despair. And he brings the discussion back to the applications of such knowledge, reflecting on our ability to use these alternate planes to achieve better relationships, better lives, better moments. Keefe’s true subject is extraordinary experience — being in the zone, in the realm of effortless action. On the Sweet Spot builds from the physical and neurological to the mystical and philosophical, then adds a crucial layer of the practical (how we can capture or recapture these wondrous states).”

 

There’s an academic paper that cites Keefe, a professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at the Duke University Medical Center, entitled Synchronization and Coherence as an Organizing Principle in the Organism, Social Interaction, and Consciousness that notes American-turned-Israeli medical sociologist Aaron Antonovsky’s theory that a “sense of coherence” as a personality trait or psychological condition, preserves, promotes health and protects against illness.  This “sense” is defined “as a pervasive, enduring though dynamic feeling of confidence” one one’s ability to cope with the challenges, stressors and pathogenic influences and rise to their demands for increased effort and engagement. 

http://www.salutogenesis.hv.se/images/livsfloden_eng_794.jpg 

 

“… In his formulation, the sense of coherence has three components:

Comprehensibility: a belief that things happen in an orderly and predictable fashion and a sense that you can understand events in your life and reasonably predict what will happen in the future.

Manageability: a belief that you have the skills or ability, the support, the help, or the resources necessary to take care of things, and that things are manageable and within your control.

Meaningfulness: a belief that things in life are interesting and a source of satisfaction, that things are really worthwhile and that there is good reason or purpose to care about what happens.

According to Antonovsky, the third element is the most important. If a person believes there is no reason to persist and survive and confront challenges, if they have no sense of meaning, then they will have no motivation to comprehend and manage events…..”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salutogenesis 

 

http://www.salutogenesis-shamanism.com/images/insert4.jpg 

Source of image: http://www.salutogenesis-shamanism.com/6.php 

 

“… Keefe draws from new brain research, sports psychology and ancient spiritual traditions to explain how we can use such techniques as visualization and imagery, meditation and conscious breathing to reach our full potential. He explains how understanding and practicing these mental processes can enable us to recreate them at will. The result, he believes, is the ability to focus more effectively on whatever activity we are engaged in. As he writes, we learn “to pay attention to what matters and ignore what doesn’t matter.”

Keefe believes that learning to control mental techniques will enhance our performance not only in sports, but in other aspects of our lives. “There’s no reason to only limit these sports psychology techniques like visualization to sports,” he says.

“For most of us, sports are a recreational activity,” says Keefe. “What’s really more important to us is our work, our relationships and other parts of our lives. There are all kinds of ways in which this approach can enrich your everyday life as well.”

 

 

So whose gonna qualify for the world all-star team

in stopping false flags, falsely-engendered wars,

brutal dictatorship, surveillance, genocide,

pedophilia, and Satanism?

 

 

Once there was a master craftsman who made such beautiful things out of wood that the King demanded to know the secret of his art.  “Your Highness”, said the carpenter, “There is no secret.  But there is something.  This is how I begin:

When I am about to make a table, I first collect my energies and bring my mind to absolute quietness.  I become oblivious of any reward to be gained or any fame to be acquired. When I am free from the influences of all such outer considerations, I can listen to the inner voice which tells me clearly what I have to do.

When my skill is thus concentrated, I take up my ax; I make sure that it is perfectly sharp, that it fits my hand and swings with my arm. Then I enter the forest.

I look for the right tree, the tree that is waiting to become my table.  And when I find it, I ask “What have I for you, and what have you for me?’ Then I cut down the tree and set to work. I remember how my masters taught me to bring my skill and my thought into relation with the natural qualities of the wood.”

The King said, “When the table is finished, it has a magical effect upon me; I cannot treat it as I would any other table. What is the nature of this magic?”

“Your Majesty”, said the carpenter, “what you call magic comes only from what I have told you.”

In A Way of Working, ed. E.D. Dooling. Anchor Books, 1979, 

from the original by Chuang-Tzu.

And, after all, what’s more important?  

 

People, children, lives, livelihoods, sustenance, or a silly game that costs hundreds of dollars a month to play?

“Life itself is always a trial. In training, you must polish yourself to face the great challenges of life. Transcend the realm of life and death, and then you will be able to make your way calmly and safely through any crisis that confronts you.”

Morihei Ueshiba, The Art of Peace 

(translated and edited by John Stevens)

(Shambhala Publications, Boston 2002).

What can we do? (Part Two)

What can we do? (Part Two)

 

http://www.shalinibosbyshell.com/images/frame_empathy.jpg

 

Empathy:  When you are not you, but that which you wish to understand

For historians, empathizing means being able to see the world through other people’s eyes. Biographers “get into the minds of their subjects–their thoughts, emotions and even body feelings”. You’re beginning to understand someone you have come to know when you can accurately predict their next expression.

Kan Is a difficult-to-translate Japanese term meaning something akin to a combination of empathizing and kinesthetic thinking–becoming one with the music and the instrument producing it.  C.P.E. Bach argued that “a musician cannot move others unless he too was moved. He must feel all the emotions that he hopes to rise in his audience.” Dance, music and some athletic maneuvers must simulate an empathy within the bodies of onlookers, creating within them the desire to move. A choreographer must have empathy for his or her dancers, who are the raw material from which the dances made. The choreographer, wrote Doris Humphrey, “must have a high regard for their individuality, remember that they are not like himself, and bring all of his intelligence to bear on the problem of understanding them, physically, emotionally and psychologically. Many choreographic failures are due to an insensitivity to people”. Empathizing is “a key skill for the practice of any helping relationship”.

The entire philosophy of Zen Buddhism is inextricably bound up with the idea that a person must become one with the objects of meditation, to lose his or her sense of self in order to comprehend the otherness of things as if they were not other. Thus all of the arts associated with Zen–the landscapes, rock gardens, paintings, drawings, architecture, tea ceremonies and other rituals–require the ability to empathize with nature. Buck Branneman, the trainer who inspired the novel and movie The Horse Whisperer, uses the horse’s own language of subtle body movements and gestures. “There’s no secret to this”, he says. “I just know what we need to do in order for both of us to speak the same language and dance the dance.” Jane Goodall, who has worked with chimpanzees in the wild, notes that “subtle communication cues denoting slight changes in mood or attitude toward other chimpanzees are more readily detected once empathy has been established.” In A River Runs Through It, the story of 2 sons of a Presbyterian minister, all dedicated fly fisherman, the older son achieves a strong sense of the river, its eddies and currents, the environment in which the fish hides. He says “I’m pretty good with a rod, but I need 3 more years before I can think like a fish.” The younger son, a master fisherman, responds “But you’re the know how to think like a dead stone fly.” Thomas Eisner pioneered the study of the chemical defense and communications systems of insects, and would dream of talking to ants in Spanish. Once he dreamed he was an insect talking to insects and telling them that he had dreamed he was a human. Of the oldest and best preserved tricks in the hunter’s repertoire is to throw the skin of an animal he is caught over his own body in order to blend with his prey. To be successful, you must learn to act and think like that animal. What better way then to take on the role of the hunted, to imagine how the creature will respond? A hunt is a battle of wits, and the avid hunter soon develops a deep sense of respect for his prey.

The eminent philosopher Sir Karl Popper said “you should enter into your problem situation in such a way the almost become part of it.” Charles Ketterling, the long-term director of research at General Motors, would often reprimand engineers who got lost in complex calculation by saying something like “yes, but do you know what it feels like to be a piston in an engine?” Alexander Graham Bell became the systems he studied. While he was working on new ways to educate the deaf and mute, he mentally became deaf and mute, and figuratively vanished from his family. Computer programmers and designers have walked around inside their microchips in programs like characters sucked into the world of electronic micro circuitry (see the movie Tron).

These people not only know their subjects objectively, they know them subjectively. But how can you practice empathizing? Practice inner attention, which centers on things we can see, hear, touch and feel in real and imaginary circumstances. Observe your own responses to the world. Remember physical and emotional memories of your responses. Practice external attention to people and things outside yourself. Observe how they respond and react to particular situations or stimuli. Imagine what the object of your external attention is sensing and feeling. Pretend that its world is your world. How would you respond if you were it? Find connections to sensations and emotions that exist in  yourself. Act out the part of a component within the system.

Sparks of Genius: The 13 Thinking Tools of the World’s Most Creative People, Robert and Michele Root-Bernstein, Houghton Mifflin, New York. 1999. [The primary tools are observing, imaging, abstracting, recognizing patterns, forming patterns, analogizing, body thinking, empathizing and dimensional thinking; the integrative tools are modeling, playing, transforming and synthesizing.]

 

 

http://valme.io/content/images/user/3/images/business/Emotional%20Empathy%20Cartoon.jpg

 

 

 

 

Be sure to finish reading Zimmerman’s treatise, esp. pages 15ff, as well as Napi in the new age, and then

skip on to The Defense Intelligence Agency and Shamanism

and its embedded story about “The Stick Game”.

 

Ron uses the Wu Wei theme at WordPress. I am beginning to like this man’s sense of cosmic wit. I’ve never met the man in the flesh but I betcha there’s a certain kind of gleam in his eye.  It’s bright, which may be why he’s always wearing those sunglasses: he doesn’t want to blind you at first glance.

 

http://equivalentexchange.files.wordpress.com/2012/05/wu_wei.jpg?w=450&h=337

 

The principle of least action (or stationary action) seen in the previous entry Noether’s Theorem immediately makes me think of the Taoist concept of wu wei – literally no action or effortless action. It consists of knowing when to act and knowing when not to act (or perhaps even not knowing to act). It also means natural action, or the action of natural physical or biological systems. In Western culture, such action is considered bad and “mechanical” because physical systems are thought to be like clockwork, but in Eastern culture, it is sagelike and enlightened, harmonious. Very often intention, or conscious action, gets in the way and impedes our effort.

Another example that comes to mind is the short story “On the Marionette Theatre” by Heinrich von Kleist. In the story, one of the characters comment that marionettes possess a grace humans do not, a view which contradicts ordinary aesthetics. It is claimed that our consciousness and capacity for reflection cause us to doubt ourselves or become self-conscious, and prevent us from acting with the singlemindedness and purity of an animal or a puppet. For example, a bear in the story is able to successfully fence with the narrator, by deflecting every thrust towards him seemingly without effort. And all feints are ignored, as if the bear is reading the narrator’s mind or knowing the future before it happens.

 

http://equivalentexchange.wordpress.com/2012/05/09/wu-wei-or-natural-action/ 

[Does that sound like aikido?]

 

 

Find those who will walk right next to you through the orchards and the grain, someone who won’t give up in the frozen rain.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_VmZcnWfN6s

 

 

http://www.motivationalquotesabout.com/images/quotes/why-are-you-unhappy-wei-wu-wei.jpg

 

 

 

 

http://daohead.com/images/meditation-full.png

http://daohead.com

 

 

“The truth must penetrate like an arrow — and that is likely to hurt.”

Wei-Wu-Wei

 

The first thing that must be in place in any approach to preparing for the future is to insure that there is sufficient love, laughter, good fun, music, good food, friends and family. No one could be wrong concentrating on those qualities or insuring their presence.

Creativity has not only made the human species unique in Nature; what is more important for the individual, it gives value and purpose to human existence.

Creativity requires more than technical skills and logical thought; it also needs the cultivation and collaboration of the appositional mind. If the constraint of an intellectual ideal can make man a unilateral being, physiologically underdeveloped, a better informed and foresighted community will strive toward a more harmonious development of the organism by assuring an appropriate training and a greater consideration for the other side of the brain.

http://www.its.caltech.edu/~jbogen/text/OSOB_3.html 

 

“FURTHER PRESCRIPTIONS”

My reflections on physicians I have known

Further Prescriptions

 

 

 

 

Is all this an antidote for 

the perfect storm of amnesty of hyperinflation, food riots and race wars?

 

No.  But it’s of value when combined with a totality of effort, including divestiture, self-excision from the system as much as possible, and the development of what Catherine Austin Fitts used to talk about (and probably still does) — the popsicle index, “a map, a plan, and allies”, and mapping your community for money and power.  It probably includes “prepping”, some sound thinking and planning, and more. 

We’re better learn quickly how to find proper leadership who has a thorough understanding of how to get the most out of others. 

 

I’ve been a fan of the role of games and gaming in dialogue for some time: 

“The true value of serious simulation games and the range of other digital learning tools can best be judged by the extent to which they bring people to a higher level of dialogue, discovery, research, learning and collaboration after the game or learning encounter has ended.”

 

See this  (not the first time I’ve encountered mention of the board game Carcassone) and figure out where your people should place their next tile.

 

And after all that work is done, then the love, laughter, good food, good music and good interaction will send the message about what really works. 

 

“… Using children, especially those living in deplorable conditions, for the purpose of a long term destructive agenda has to be considered evil beyond words. Isn’t it? ….

I’m always seeing where folks have good ideas of what must happen to stop the madness. What needs to be done, what doing this, what doing that will accomplish to achieve peace and prosperity and end the rule of the few crazies. What’s missing is the implementation. How we get there? We would like it to be without violence. I’ll have to admit that I don’t know and that is exactly the position that the powers that think they are want us in. Maybe you have some thoughts?”

Posted by kenny at 7:13 PM

Masters of Love is about research into how couples stay together. Failed couples exist in fight-or-flight mode, “prepared to attack and be attacked.” Successful couples create “a climate of trust and intimacy.” They do this by “scanning the social environment for things they can appreciate,” while failed couples are scanning for things to criticize.

I have two more thoughts. First, people who consistently get in bad relationships might enjoy the stimulation of fight-or-flight mode, and seek out partners who make them feel on edge. Second, I think these principles also apply to your relationship with the world, and with yourself. If you’re appreciating little things that go your way, or little things that you do right, you are living better than someone who gets worked up over things that go wrong. Of course it’s still necessary, when things do go wrong, to see them clearly. http://www.ranprieur.com

http://static.fjcdn.com/pictures/lack+of+empathy+you+have.+enjoy_cc15d2_4332556.jpg 

http://cultureofempathy.com/References/Experts/Jeremy-Rifkin.htm 

Thus we come back to Jane Addams and Seymour Melman.  Their positive vision of a peaceful nation, caring society, and independently skilled work force is fading in memory by the day.  Unless we stand up and hold these images of a kinder and more sustainable society in a public way they will be lost to the future generations.

Nothing can be more important in our lives.

posted by Bruce K. Gagnon | 11:33 AM | 1 comments

 

“As we can see from simply looking at a flower, nature knows how to organize itself,” Marianne Williamson wrote recently. “And this same force would organize human affairs if we would allow it to. This allowance occurs whenever we place our minds in correct alignment with the laws of the universe — through prayer, meditation, forgiveness and compassion. Until we do this, we will continue to manifest a world that destroys rather than heals itself. Iraq is a perfect example.”

http://www.informationclearinghouse.info/article38928.htm [journalistic malfeasance of the highest order]

 

 

Catherine Austin Fiits, at https://solari.com/blog , says:

We are not crazy. We are not black sheep. I declare that the time to serve as sin eaters for our families is over. In fact, the time has come for us to lead.

I have members in my family who have spent a life time sucking up to the rich and famous. They are on a hunt for “pet treats” – small amounts of prestige and money for which they will do mind boggling things.

That is their choice – they make their own choices. Our values take us in different directions. So be it.

We each serve our divine purpose. Be proud of it. If you love your family, allow your courage and your intelligence to support them where their matrix-hugging now puts them at risk.

Love them, but do not permit their embrace of incoherence to pressure you to pretend that it is you who are somehow incoherent.

 

 

 

Keith Jarrett Everything that lives, laments 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4C049aW6B0I (10:03)

 

 

“music is simple

 just sing your heart out

it’s over all too soon, as you well know

 and don’t forget to do a little jig !”

— Est

 

Could This Be The End of E-Mail Overload? (3:41)

 

The Jew and the Other: Alain Soral & Gilad Atzmon in Lyon

•Tags: ISRAEL

This lecture appeared on the net 24 hours ago. In spite of its length and depth, it attracted 40.000 viewers in such a short time. The meaning of it is simple:

1. we are a mass movement

2. the future of intellectual exchange is out of the Zionised academia that is suffocated with marginal ‘studies’ that detach humans from questions to do with Being & Time.

 

The late Lynn Margulis

a three-day scientific-philosophical meeting on the Darwinian-evolutionary view of life

The far-more-difficult science-education problem:

The persistent problem is how to wake up public awareness, especially in the global scientifically literate public, of the overwhelming evidence that the three buildings collapsed by controlled demolition. (Much has been published in peer-reviewed scientific journals, see Ch. 4 of The Mysterious Collapse). We, on the basis of hard evidence, must conclude that the petroleum fires related to the aircraft crashes were irrelevant (except perhaps as a cover story).We citizens of Earth within and beyond the boundaries of the United States who demand detailed evidence for extraordinary claims agree with Griffin: the rapid destruction of New York skyscrapers on September 11, 2001 was planned and executed by people inside the US government.

http://rockcreekfreepress.tumblr.com/post/353434420/two-hit-three-down-the-biggest-lie 

 

JODY PAULSON

I believe it’s up to each and every one of us to contribute our own special talents to make this world a better place for all of us.

 

 

 

Nothing is rich but the inexhaustible wealth of nature.  She shows us only surfaces, but she is a million fathoms deep. — Ralph Waldo Emerson

 

 

 

“[Flight attendant Jan] Brown liked everything to be perfect on her flights and lost no opportunity to make it so.  If she was serving passengers in first class, she would write a personal note to each one and tuck it inside the white linen napkin on the service tray. She always called her work “the service”, a nearly religious experience….”

Laurence Gonzales, Page 11, “Flight 232”

http://books.wwnorton.com/books/Flight-232/ 

 

Laborare est orare. 

http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/a-way-of-working-d-m-dooling/1110887921?ean=9780930407018 

In this enriching collection of eleven interrelated essays, A Way of Working explores the ancient relationship of art, order, and craft. Craft is considered as a “sort of ark” for the transmission of real knowledge about being, and about our deep creative aspirations. The book includes contributions from D. M. Dooling, Joseph Cary, Paul Jordan-Smith, Michael Donner, Harry Remde, Jean Kinkead Martine, Jean Sulzberger, Chanit Roston, and P. L. Travers. This group of authors write not as individuals but as members of a community — a guild effort. As one chapter heading put it: the alchemy of craft.

****

 

Face-to-face communications substantially increases levels of cooperation. Indeed, in experimental work done using games that mimics social dilemmas, no other variable appears to have as consistent and strong effect. Even when passing messages via computer terminals, the levels of cooperation are far below those seen in the game played with face-to-face communication. As Elinor Ahlstrom puts it, “exchanging mutual commitment, increasing trust, creating and reinforcing norms, and developing a group identity appeared to be the most important processes that make communication efficacious.” Why? We are wired that way, culturally, genetically and neurologically. Cooperative behavior promotes survival of the gene pool. Large brains, extended families, and community ties mutually embraced one another.

 

Liars, Lovers and Heroes: What the New Brain Science Reveals About How We Become Who We Are, Steven R. Quartz, Ph.D. and Terrence J. Sejnowski, Ph.D., HarperCollins/Wm. Morrow, New York 2002, which notes, in turn:

Marwell and Ames (1979): “experiments on the provision of public goods I:  resources, interest, group size, and the free-rider problem”, American Journal of Sociology 84:1335-60.;

Ledyard, J.  (1995): “Public Goods: A Survey of Experimental Research”, in Handbook of Experiential Economics, edited by Kagel and Roth, Princeton University Press, pp. 111-94;

Dawes, McTavish and Shaklee (1977): “Behavior, communication and assumptions about other people’s behavior in a common dilemma situation, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 35: 1-11;

Sally, D. (1995):  “Conservation, Cooperation and Social Dilemmas: A meta-analysis  of experiments from 1958 to 1992”, Rationality and Society 7:58-92;

Ostrom, E. (1998): “ a behavioral approach to the rational choice theory of collective action”, presidential address, American Political Science Association, American Political Science Review 92:1-21.

 

 

The Forming – Storming – Norming – Performing model

of group development 

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tuckman’s_stages_of_group_development 

 

****

 

Organizational learning: how a team learns to win

 

A learning organization is one in which people continuously expand their capacity to create the results they desire, where new and expansive patterns of thinking are nurtured, where collective aspiration is set free, and where people are continually learning how to learn together.

Most of us at one time or another been part of a great “team”, a group of people who functioned together in an extraordinary way–who trusted one another, who complemented each other’s strengths and compensated for each other’s limitations, who had common goals that were larger than individual goals, and who produced extraordinary results.

I have met many people who have experienced this sort of profound teamwork–in sports, or in the performing arts, or in business. Many say that they have spent much of their life looking for that experience again. What they experienced was a learning organization. The team that became great didn’t start off great–it learned how to produce extraordinary results.

 

The five disciplines of a learning organization:

 

Systems thinking: Events, however distant in time and space, are connected within the same pattern. Each has an influence on the rest, an influence that is usually hidden from view. We tend to focus on snapshots of isolated parts of the system, and wonder why our deepest problems never seem to get solved.

 

Personal mastery: People with a high level of mastery are able to consistently realize the results that matter most deeply to them by becoming committed to their own lifelong learning. Personal mastery is a discipline of continually clarifying and deepening our personal vision, of focusing our energies, of developing patience, and of seeing reality objectively. As such, it is an essential cornerstone of the learning organization–it is the learning organization’s spiritual foundation.

 

Mental models are deeply ingrained assumptions, generalizations or even pictures or images that influence how we understand the world and how we take action. Very often, we are not consciously aware of our mental models or the effects they have on our behavior. Many insights fail to get put into practice because they conflict with powerful, tacit mental models. “The discipline of working with mental models starts with turning the mirror inward; learning to unearth our internal pictures of the world, to bring them to the surface and to hold them rigorously to scrutiny. It also includes the ability to carry on “learningful” conversation that balance inquiry and advocacy, where people expose their own thinking effectively and make their thinking open to the influence of others.

 

Building shared vision: Few organizations have sustained some measure of greatness in the absence of goals, values and missions that had become deeply shared throughout the organization. “When there is a genuine vision (as opposed to the all-too-familiar “vision statement”), people excel and learn, not because they are told to, but because they want to. But many leaders have personal visions that never get translated into shared visions that galvanize an organization. All too often, the team’s vision has revolved around the charisma of a leader, or around a crisis that galvanized everyone temporarily. What has been lacking is a discipline for translating individual vision into shared vision–not a “cookbook” but a set of principles and guiding practices. The practice of shared vision involves the skills of unearthing shared “pictures of the future” that foster genuine commitment and enrollment rather than compliance. In mastering this discipline, readers learn how counterproductive it is to dictate a vision, no matter how heartfelt.

 

Team learning: The discipline of team learning starts with “dialogue”, the capacity of members of the team system to suspend assumptions and enter into a genuine “thinking together”. To the Greeks, dia-logos meant a free-flowing of meeting throughout a group, allowing the group to discover insights not attainable individually. Dialogue differs from the more common “discussion”, which has its roots with “percussion” and “concussion”, really a heaving of ideas back-and-forth in a winner-takes-all competition. The discipline of dialogue also involves learning how to recognize the patterns of interaction in teams that undermine learning. The patterns of defensiveness are often deeply ingrained in how a team operates. If unrecognized, they undermine learning. If recognized and surfaced creatively, they can actually accelerate learning.

“By discipline”, I do not mean an “enforced order” or “means of punishment”, but a body of theory and technique that must be studied and mastered to be put into practice. A discipline is a developmental path for acquiring skill or competency. Practicing a discipline is different from practicing a discipline is different from emulating “a model”. All too often, innovations are described in terms of the “best practices”. Such descriptions can often do more harm than good, leading to piecemeal copying or playing catch-up. No great team is ever been built trying to emulate another one; individual greatness is not achieved by trying to copy another “great person”.

When you ask people about what it is being like part of a great team, what is most striking is the meaningfulness of the experience. People talk about being part of something larger than themselves, of being connected, of being generative. It becomes quite clear that, for many, their experiences as part of truly great teams stand out as singular periods of life lived to the fullest. Some spent the rest of their lives trying to recapture that spirit.

Learning has become synonymous with “taking in information”, which is only distantly related to real learning. It would be silly to say “I just read a great book about bicycle riding–now I can ride a bike”. Real learning gets to the heart of what it means to be human. Through learning we re-create ourselves. Through learning we become able to do something were never able to do. Through learning we extend our capacity to create, to be part of the generative process of life. There is within each of us a deep hunger for this type of learning.
The Fifth Discipline: The Art and Practice of a Learning Organization, Peter Senge, Doubleday/Currency, New York, 1990. [This is not a particularly easy book to read or understand but, for the individual involved in leading organizations, it has some powerful and wonderfully unsettling ideas. See also The Fifth Discipline Workbook: Strategies and Tools for Building a Learning Organization, Peter Senge et al, Doubleday/Currency, New York. 1994.]

 

****

 

http://img.nauticexpo.com/images_ne/photo-g/rowing-shell-competition-octuple-scull-with-coxswain-22350-320831.jpg 

The coxswain voices perceptions but not judgments. By giving feedback about how the boat feels in a tone that is engaged but neutral, the coxswain hands the rowers a problem and lets them find a solution. The crew will learn at its fastest rate if it can perform its athletic experiments without the emotional noise of criticism. As in any science, the work goes best when the experimenters fix their attention on the lab bench rather than on their opinions of themselves and each other.

Mind Over Water: Lessons on Life from the Art of Rowing, Craig Lambert,
Houghton Mifflin, New York, 1998.

****

Mobility and Alignment of Purpose

One’s true capacity for moving, or being moved, can be achieved only when one’s commitment to others is in fact connected to and derives from his primary commitment to himself.

When we find this kind of alignment of purpose, there is a harmony of motivation that can provide the fuel in clarity overcome great obstacles in the pursuit of great challenge.

 

The Inner Game of Work, W. Timothy Gallwey, Random House, 2000. [Aimed at the corporate / management market, its sections on coaching are exceptional for their insights on how to empower others.]

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A leader is best

when people barely know that he exists,

not so good when people obey him and acclaim him,

worst when they despise him.

 

If you fail to honor people, they will fail to honor you.

But of a good leader, who boasts little,

When his work is done, his aim fulfilled,

they will all saywe did this ourselves’.

Lao Tzu, Tao Te Ching

 

****

kennyJuly 11, 2014 at 6:49 AM

 

“In the sixth century BC, the Chinese philosopher Lao Tzu identified the world’s biggest problem. Individuals viewed themselves as powerless. The burden of impotence made them resent others and fear life, which, in turn, led them to seek power through controlling others. The quest was not an expression of authority, but one of aggression. Lao Tzu rooted most of social problems in the individual’s sense of paralysis.”

The Power of the Powerlesst

from a comment at the article…

“It is consent, withdrawal of consent that tyrants are afraid of. Our own government see’s peoples withdrawal of their consent as the existential threat to the state, its power, and those running it.

Indeed, the truth sets one free in every myriad way, it is Liberty, it is the utmost in legitimacy of people.

It is upstream of tyranny and tyrants.

The truth reveals the illegitimacy of those in power and their lawlessness.”

[I have problems with strategies and online kibitzers who lobby for giving “The State” a few more shoves down the road toward collapse without a concerted and detailed discussion about how massive amounts of people (locally or globally) will manage to function well enough to survive, let alone thrive, or without any discussion of the types of socio-governmental approaches will prevent further violence and destruction. Sacrificing life, liberty and the pursuit of eudaimonia won’t prevent anything except life, liberty and Eudaimonia.]

 

Mindmap to Enhance Your World

I’d like to offer an explanation of my Mind Map 2014. Click on it; it’s an uploaded and upgraded two-page pdf.  The word map as intended to be a mindmap, but I didn’t have either the proper software or outstanding artistic skills, so I cheated, and did the best I could.

Its purpose is to be an elemental guide to the content of that old collection of excerpts I called “Summon The Magic” whose mission is to allow you to come to a functional understanding of how you can learn to use your mind or brain to its best advantage, to make it work for you.

You can also see it from the perspective of a parent, teacher, trainer, learning coach, business leader, entrepreneur or a creative artist.

 

An explanation is useful and will extend the value of the “mind map”. Creating such an explanation is also a review of the material for me.

If you printed out the sheets, widened the margins so it can breathe better, taped the second sheet to the bottom of the first sheet, and got out some fine-point colored ink markers and a ruler and French curve ….

http://etc.usf.edu/clipart/76100/76130/76130_ellip_frncrv_md.gif 

then you could stand back and see the structure flow from head to foot.

 

The top, surrounding the word Intelligences, is a riff off of the seminal work of Howard Gardner.

http://www.tecweb.org/styles/gardner.html 

http://www.bgfl.org/bgfl/custom/resources_ftp/client_ftp/ks3/ict/multiple_int/what.cfm 

Seven Times Smarter: 50 Activities, Games and Projects to Develop the Seven Intelligences of Your Child, Laurel Schmidt, Three Rivers Press, New York 2001.

 

You can examine any of those sub-headings or multiple intelligences and see where your strengths and weaknesses lie.

You can work with and improve on your strengths, and seek to improve your weaknesses.

Your particular mix can be identified and provide some further sense of direction for your further studies, your career, or how you can apply what you already know in the areas of your strongest intelligences.

Google for the term “multiple intelligences” and scan for additional titles by Gardner. http://howardgardner.com/

 

http://rebeccaholder28.files.wordpress.com/2013/02/sci-ed.jpg 

 

The second block, what might be seen as the shoulders of the skeletal structure, center around the triad of Learning, Training, and Education.

Those who provide those processes to you operate from positions of trust, power, authority and respect.

[Here is a 25-page pdf “On Mentors and Coaches”]

You bring to your mentors, teachers and coaches your interests, curiosity, awe, yearning and inquiry. [You could spend 30 minutes simply listing elements within those five categories for you.]

Your coaches and trainers will provide — particularly if they are training a neuromuscular activity — the practice, repetition, and cognitive cues; you have to do the homework, the drills and go to practice/class and thus provide the repetition, the habit, and then find your groove.

Both of you will work along the spectrum of awareness and interest, applying discipline to the point of absorption.

 

 

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-vZ4nt8boxrs/UaJ1BHp97hI/AAAAAAAAHqQ/iT4ovmKe4hQ/s1600/13thinking.jpg 

 

Sparks of Genius: The 13 Thinking Tools of the World’s Most Creative People, Robert and Michele Root-Bernstein, Houghton Mifflin, New York. 1999.

http://www.e-bookspdf.org/download/sparks-of-genius.html 

 

 

 

http://ericbooth.net/wp-content/uploads/2012/12/The-Everyday-Work-of-Art-Awakening-the-Extraordinary-in-Your-Daily-Life-Eric-Booth-9780595193806-Amazon.com-Books.png

 

Use your PREP tool: your personally-relevant entry point

We are what we are attracted to, and become what we yearn toward.

Follow your attraction through the spectrum of curiosity, interest, admiration, concern, connection, resonance and change.

 

The Everyday Work of Art: Awakening the Extraordinary in Your Daily Life, Eric Booth, Authors’ Guild Back-in-Print (iUniverse.com) (ISBN 0-595-19380-3)

 

“… Inherent in the artistic experience is the capacity to expand our sense of the way the world is or might be. This amazing human imaginative, empathetic capacity provides the artistic experience….. An entry point is a distinctive aesthetic feature of the work with enough dynamic relevance that many people will be able to apply it to parts of their own lives to discover meaningful relevance….To learn more about entry points or teaching artistry, read my book mentioned above, or check out many available essays on my website (ericbooth.net) or read David Wallace’s excellent book Reaching Out. ….

http://ericbooth.net/three-and-a-half-bestsellers/

Following your personally-relevant entry point is the backbone of the flow theory. It’s how you become engaged and absorbed.

Flow: The Psychology of Optimal Experience, Mihalyi Csikszentmihalyi, Harper & Row, New York, 1990. [The flow theory is a major component in performance enhancement and is a wellspring for many applications. See also his sequel The Evolving Self, as well as Flow in Sports.]

 

Notice that it all starts with intent. 

 

Attention has four axes: broad, narrow, external, and internal.

 

A simple explanation with athletic implications is Nideffer’s model.

http://www.science.smith.edu/exer_sci/ESS565/MPres1/sld011.htm 

 

Attention is a core property of all perceptual and cognitive operations.

 

A lengthy, detailed, “taxonomy of internal and external attention”  from the perspective of psychology, neurobiology and brain research can be found here:

http://www.princeton.edu/ntblab/pdfs/Chun_ARP_2011.pdf 

 

You sharpen the point of the spear of discipline with concentration, which eventually leads to harmony and synthesis of the whole.

 

The torso of the skeletal structure of the mind map is centered around split symmetry. [The “translation” of the text and its various fonts into a pdf format somewhat destroyed this functional symmetry in earlier versions; the uploaded version here is improved with the upgraded Mavericks OS software.]

 

Put the gestalt mind {-} logic mind in the middle.

You have to use both sides in a balanced way; binaural beat-based guided brain wave meditation opens up your corpus callosum and exercises it.

 

At the top, the spectrum or curve of desire:

First you have or discover a passion, even temporarily; this then generates a fantasy (“wouldn’t it be nice if…?) which sometimes turns into an extended or developed dream. The dream transforms itself into a vision when you add detail. And then you’re only a step or two from developing an objective, or a list of them. You start to set goals.

Your mentors, guides and teachers can help you differentiate your goals

as outcome goals, behavioral goals, and process goals.

 

Motivation’s four dimensions:

Targeted zone of behavior

(e.g., be more consistent, stop swearing, focus on defense).

Quantity of behavior

(e.g., run more miles today than yesterday);

Quality of behavior

(e.g., shoot free throws more accurately);

Intensity of behavior 

(e.g., level of activation and amount of energy delivered).

 It’s your choice…

  • where to be active,
  • how much to be active,
  • what level of excellence to aim  for, and
  • how much of yourself to invest.

Coaches Guide to Sport Psychology, Rainer Martens, Ph.D., Human Kinetics, Champaign, IL, 1997. [A high-level academic textbook for coaches.]

Here is a 15-page pdf on the topic of goals: Goals pdf

 

The second tier of the torso of the skeletal structure of the mind map pertains to Spirit, Mind and Body. It is breath that links these three key elements. While one can study intensely the role of breathing in psychology and physiology, its relevance to meditation, etc., the simplest approach is to pay attention to your breathing.

On the body end of the triad are the brain, the lungs, the heart, the digestive system (much more important than we generally understand). You could spend a lifetime appreciating the interactions. Such is proprioception and kinesthetic awareness. The gamma system of your neurology is your internal feedback loop.

Within the mind, there are entire libraries and sciences given over to your exploration. Add colleges, associations, think tanks, institutes and so on and you can get lost and dis-oriented. Stop thinking; keep breathing; believe in yourself.

At the spirit end of the spectrum are awe, yūgen (profound grace and subtlety)[1], satori, stillness, silence, surrender, sacred places, empathy, love and gratitude. Again, there are libraries, book vendors, churches and religious institutes and their leaders, pastors, rabbis, gurus, shamans and charlatans. But you can pray and learn to meditate without them.

http://img.pandawhale.com/post-25617-yugen-meaning-gif-XonM.gif 

 

Some of the vertebral joints in the skeletal structure of the mind map include:

the aikido-based triad of balance, centering and grounding (Richard Strozzi Heckler is an outstanding writer and teacher, though there are surely others);

the triad of renewal, relaxation and rest ( look for the books by Jim Loehr, Ed.D. in  http://boydownthelane.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/Bibliography-pdf.pdf );

the criss-crossed axes of connection, detachment, differentiation and integration through which we move our self; sometimes we must be apart, sometimes we must be with others, sometimes we feel different, sometimes we feel similar; we are unique and yet we are an integral part of It all (this is the epiphany I had sitting still, basking in the sun listening to the sounds of the waves sitting on the granite cliffs at Pemaquid Point, the grand ripping of the Curtain to which I surrendered through my silence);

the spectrum of physical activity that includes art, music (musicians are athletes of the small muscle groups), the martial arts, dance, play, recreation and sport (see Deep Play, Diane Ackerman, Random House, New York, 1999);

the grand Daoistic dynamic symmetry of contemplation and action, in the middle of which sits continuous incremental improvement;

examples of awakened mental development which extends from meditation and mindfulness to visualization and mental rehearsal and beyond through autogenic training (the bibliography contains many books on meditation and mindfulness: see below for the ones I recommend)

(think of it as preventive mind control under your complete control, ownership and decision-making process); 

and, finally,

the multi-faceted diamond of skills and challenge, of flow and action, of goals band feedback, and its core of immersion, immediacy and intensity.

 

 

http://russpetcoff.files.wordpress.com/2011/04/nate-appleman.jpg 

Source of image:

https://deeppoliticsforum.com/forums/entry.php?12-Intensity-Immediacy-and-Immersion 

 

On Autogenic Training:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Autogenic_training 

Google the term for more.

The Break-Out Principle, Herbert Benson, M.D. and William Proctor, Scribner, New York 2003. [How to activate your accessible biomechanical “trigger” to power up creativity, insight, stress-reduction, and top-notch performance, by the author of The Relaxation Response.]

On Mindfulness:

Mindfulness, Ellen J. Langer, Addison-Wesley Publishing, Reading, MA 1989. [The apposition/antidote to mindlessness, by a Harvard psychology professor.]

Counter Clockwise: mindful health and the power of possibility, Ellen Langer, Ballantine Books, NY 2009.

Emotional Alchemy: How The Mind Can Heal the Heart, Tara Bennett-Goleman, Harmony Books, NY 2001. [Written by a psychotherapist, the wife of the author of the book Emotional Intelligence, on schema therapy and mindfulness.]

On Becoming An Artist, Ellen Langer, Ballantine Books, NY 2005.

The Power of Mindful Learning, Ellen Langer, PhD., Addison-Wesley Publishing, Reading, MA 1995. [Ought to be required reading for all teachers and coaches.]

Wherever You Go, There You Are: Mindfulness Meditation in Everyday Life, Jon Kabat-Zinn, Hyperion, NY 1994. [This is considered elemental; the author teaches how mindfulness is applied to stress reduction and one’s physical health,  and was affiliated with the University of Massachusetts Medical School. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jon_Kabat-Zinn ] See http://www.mindfulnesscds.com 

 

 

The hips and thighs of the skeletal structure of the mind map, the pivot points and strengths, include emotion and physiology.

Physiology gives us vision and perception (including acuity and peripheral awareness), the flexibility, agility and dynamism of movement in space, and the structure, speed and flexibility with which we choose action and movement, and the strength, balance and force with which we execute that action and movement.

Emotion has to do with belief (world-view, and belief in self), identity, faith, expectation, passion, dedication, choice, commitment, doubt, tension and anxiety, fear, distraction, intention, focus and composure.

It also brings together all of the comprehension of all of the factors that we bring to bear through our trip down the framework. You can’t execute excellence crisply if you don’t comprehend what you’re doing, who you are, and how to do it.

 

The knees, calves and ankle joints of the skeletal structure are the five A’s 

(attention, acceptance, appreciation, affection, and allowing);

see David Richco’s books, or google the phrase in red.

 

I’ve included them twice for a simple reason: you have to apply them to your own self first,

 

and then you have to apply them to everyone else.

The connecting tissue is the understanding of losing your self-consciousness in the way you go about things. From a strictly training and performance perspective, you have to learn the skill or technique so well that you can put aside thinking about how to do it. It is the highest form of meditation in the middle of action. Artistic expression, dance, the martial arts, and deep play are all places where we practice losing our self-consciousness.

Losing self-consciousness is not about losing awareness or focus. It’s about getting beyond your self, not making you and your needs the primary issue or drive. We’ve all driven in and out of strip malls and box stores where we encountered people who are stuck in self-consciousness. They’re lost in their cell phone conversation at 35 mph; they aren’t aware of the presence of you or anyone else. This is the mindlessness for which mindfulness is the antidote.

I submit that this is at the root of the currently dominant world-view.

 

http://www.wellnesscoachingaustralia.com.au/Blog%20images/mindlessness.jpg 

 

The entire skeletal structure of the mind map rests on the feet.

 

The two feet are leadership and team.

The feet are what propel you, keep you grounded, provide secure footing, enable you to walk, or run, or sprint, or run a long-distance race.

If there is someone out there in the world that thinks you can achieve something worthwhile alone, without the integrated interaction of at least a few, or several, then they need to send in a comment and some suggested readings.

 

Both leadership and team start with intent.

Team is also about expectation and cohesion, trust, communication, character, learning, and energy.

Leadership is about convocation (calling people together), will, audacity, courage, and enrollment (or getting others to sign on to the task).

Leadership is also about vision, clarity, energy, vision, and communications skills; it requires intellect, heart, humility, the ability to model behavior and action, the ability to create and sustain innovation and momentum, the ability to retain flexibility, and the ability to lead people through processes of problem-solving.

Applied teamwork and leadership require inspiration, imagination, improvisation and the synthesis of it all through to break-through to mastery and the achievement of quality and excellence.

 

Every word on that mind map can be a personally-relevant entry point for your own exploration and improvement.

Or you can take the wholistic approach and use the totality of it.

If you hung it on your wall and simply meditated, paying attention to your thoughts as your eyes wander, then when you get up, you may have been moved.

Nosce te ipsum.