Tag Archives: psychology

love presence

 love presence

“A person’s identity,” Amin Maalouf wrote as he contemplated what he so poetically called the genes of the soul, “is like a pattern drawn on a tightly stretched parchment. Touch just one part of it, just one allegiance, and the whole person will react, the whole drum will sound.” 

https://www.brainpickings.org/what-makes-a-person?-seven-layers-of-identity-in-literature-and-life 

music:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l-phggJG2sM

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https://www.visualnews.com/2017/01/30/new-photography-check-helpful-visualization/ 

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A Secret Forest Grew for Millennia in North America Without Anyone Noticing

February 3, 2017 by kristalklear 

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The Psychology of What Makes a Great Story

https://www.brainpickings.org/2016/01/20/jerome-bruner-actual-minds-possible-world 

http://www.luminantdesign.com/images/services/identity.jpg 

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The Psychology of Time and the Paradox of How Impulsivity and Self-Control Mediate Our Capacity for Presence 

“Consciousness is tied to corporeality and temporality: I experience myself as existing with a body over time.”

https://www.brainpickings.org/2016/04/27/time-felt-marc-wittmann/ 

Lizards don’t plan for the future and learning to wait is central to how children develop self-reliance.

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31 rolls of film from a WW2 soldier are discovered and processed. And the results are breathtaking.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OBHwNH7iHsE [10:32]

[Note that, like many of these offerings, these come from a producer with a channel or newsletter subscription process you can explore and embrace.]

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http://www.warrencenter.com/warrencenter/Gallery/WCC08%5F065%2EJPG 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BW17SJB8TZ8 

 

It was 42 years ago this week when I drove down out of the country district where I held down my first full-time post-college job to a university educational  conference/retreat center in a small town near where they start the Boston Marathon.  I’d written and produced a college student’s final project in video production for a degree in mass communications in which I enlisted the help of friends, co-workers, and others and spliced together a 30-minute narrative about what a top-quality EMS system was supposed to look like

It was the era of Vietnam in which Army surgeons received patients who’d suffered severe injury burped out of Medevac choppers in which they’d been intubated, given IV access for drug and fluid and plasma push, and perhaps even placed in inflatable rubber shorts for anti-shock treatment. 

In the States — where I’d stayed, having been first introduced to entry-level training as a soldier with hand-to-hand combat skills, some survival training, rudimentary firearms training using an M-1 and blanks, and lots and lots of backwoods through-the-brush-and-swamps marching and bivouacking — I was a probationary firefighter during one of those periods in which I’d dropped out of college, having been dismayed by the quality and nature of teaching, having been told by the dean of the pre-med program that I lacked sufficient excellence in the sciences to even entertain admission let alone complete a program. 

As a full-time paid probationary firefighter in a town where there were rarely any fires, I was given an advanced 40-hour course that was a precursor of the curriculum developed and approved by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons which became THE standard of care for that decade. I could not become a paramedic; there were no paramedic programs nor even medical acceptance of their value; first I had to build the system, and find the physicians and others who did.

I was on the cutting edge of the social engineering scalpel that turned an uncoordinated approach that offered virtually no applied skills to one that was eminently capable of saving someone’s life across a wide swath of accident and illness.  I flunked ladders but excelled at the space-time response parameters in ambulance work. And now I was going to spend a week in this conference center to become part of the state’s second wave of approved instructors for the mandatory 81-hour course for emergency medical technicians. 

I had already become one of the state’s first EMT’s and worked for the premiere private ambulance company in the Western half of the state; every other day, in a 24-on/24-off cycle, I was the operational commander of a fleet of 14 ambulances serving an area that extended from Palmer to Westfield, from Longmeadow to Goshen and Hatfield. 

On an evening that featured a soft snowfall, I parked my 1974 white Fiat X1/9 and walked into the reception area on a Sunday night to meet the faculty and students with whom I would spend a week. I was three-quarters of the way through my first assignment in establishing a local council, assisting towns in the acquisition of new ambulances, organizing EMT associations, winning consensus on memorandum of agreements, etc.  We would hold our first disaster drill later that spring. But here was an adventure, an opportunity to learn and to meet new people. 

As student EMT instructors, we were expected to have already mastered the skills and passed the exams (both paper and skills-based stations where you performed under the watch of stern evaluators). Our instructors were experts in training. And as a student instructor, you were expected to teach a short section of topical material of their choice.  There were probably 35 other students enrolled; some of them were nurses.

By Tuesday, we were becoming more at ease with the process and with the instructors. The chief instructor would eventually become my boss when I was cycled into the state office to help him write the state’s first responder regulations and training guidelines and where I helped his boss write the first statewide EMS plan. But on Tuesday we were focused on finding and building confidence in our ability to present ourselves as knowledgeable experts to a room filled with firefighters needing to learn about the emergent presentation of heart attack, diabetic crises, or people who’d fallen off their roof, or who had had a severe car accident. We were called upon to critique our co-students. After class, we were free to go out and find a bar and grille just as long as we were back in time for lights out. 

On Wednesday, I got put in a group of folks for a second round of student teaching practice assignments;  I had a good deal of confidence.  I worked my way through college, having returned with some focus, by working for a private embulance company. My first call brought me to a car accident, two blocks from HQ and six blocks from the hospital, in which the young woman driver suffered a penetrating skull impalement; the quarter vent window pillar had been driven up through the cheek behind the eyeball, the wound oozing grey matter, the pillar de-impaled on recoil. Luckily my task was bandaging, not neurosurgery. Teaching with a set of pre-approved high-quality slides, a curriculum synched to bright orange textbooks, and equipment paid for by major foundations and the state government was, relatively speaking, going to be a piece of cake. The worst thing that could happen was that a student could ask a question I couldn’t answer in a situation in which I could say ‘I’ll have the answer for you next time we meet’.

One student, however, was obviously nervous about public speaking, despite an even greater level experience. She represented the individual on the team who was the recipient of patients wheeled in on stretchers by brash young firefighter types who grabbed clean sheets and went on their way; she became the organizer and first level of hospital-based care, assessing, calming, overseeing her own team.  This nurse that day had drawn the long straw and had to present on the complexities of diabetic emergencies like insulin shock and diabetic coma. Her nerves stemmed not from her lack of command of the material but from the typical and human fears of public speaking.

I passed her a note that said she needn’t be nervous .. most students would be focused on her beauty.  

The rest, as they say, is history.

We went out together for the first time the next night and parted knowing that “we were an item” that Friday, February 14th, a date we celebrate as our “anniversary”. 

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https://www.brainpickings.org/2015/03/31/how-to-love-thich-nhat-hanh/ 

healing

You Can’t Handle the Truth!

Psychologists Explain Why People are Still in Denial About 9/11 Despite the Hard Evidence

 

https://vimeo.com/121786070

(Note: be sure to view the 30 minute video from which the transcript below was obtained. It has many images that I have never seen before – and I have probably spent a hundred hours or more studying the facts of 9/11.)

Seven psychologists plus author David Ray Griffin, Ph.D., provide insights on why so many people are in total denial regarding the truth about 9/11 despite “years of hard scientific evidence that disproves the government theory about what happened on September 11.”

Trauma, fear, pride, and cognitive dissonance (information that contradicts beliefs about our worldview) are among the reasons given for why people can’t handle the truth about 9/11.

The panelists were: Marti Hopper, Ph.D (Licensed Clinical Psychologist); Frances Shure, M.A. (Licensed Professional Counselor); Robert Griffin, Licensed Psychologist; Robert Hopper, Ph.D. (Licensed Clinical Psychologist); Danielle Duperet, PhD; Dorthy Lorig, M.A., Counseling Psychologist; John Freedom, M.A., Personal Development Counselor; David Ray Griffin, Ph.D., professor/author

Why are people resistant to looking at the hard evidence regarding 9/11?

At this point, we have 15 years of hard scientific evidence that disproves the government theory about what happened on September 11, 2001.  Yet, people continue to be either oblivious to the fact that this information exists or completely resistant to looking at this information.  So, the question becomes: Why?

Why is it that people have so much trouble hearing this information? From my work, I think we would be remiss not to look at the impact of trauma…

As we know, the horrors of what happened on 9/11 were televised all over the world. They were televised, in fact, live.  We witnessed the deaths of almost 3,000 of our fellow Americans.  We know that this had a very severe and traumatic impact on a majority of the population.   I, myself, cried for weeks after September 11.

A friend of mine, who is a psychologist in practice here in Boulder, said that her case load increased tremendously after 9/11.  People who she had not seen in ten years were coming back into her practice.

So, I think it’s safe to say that collectively, as a nation, because of what happened on September 11, we experienced trauma.

9/11 Truth Conflicts with Our Worldview, Causing Cognitive Dissonance

Why do people resist this information – the information that shows that the official story about 9/11 cannot be true?  What I’ve learned is that, as humans, each of us has a world view.  That worldview is usually formed, in great part, by the culture that we grow up in.

When we hear information that contradicts our worldview, social psychologists call the resulting insecurity cognitive dissonance. For example, with 9/11 we have one cognition, which is the official story of 9/11 – what our government told us and what our media repeated to us over and over – that 19 Muslims attacked us.

On the other hand, we have what scientists, researchers, architects, and engineers are now beginning to tell us, which is that there is evidence that shows that the official story cannot be true.  So now, we’ve lost our sense of security.  We are starting to feel vulnerable.  Now we’re confused.

Our Psychological Defenses Kick In When Our Beliefs Are Challenged

9/11 truth challenges our most fundamental beliefs about our government and about our country.  When your beliefs are challenged or when two beliefs are inconsistent, cognitive dissonance is created.  9/11 truth challenges the beliefs that our country protects and keeps us safe, and that America is the good guy….

When your beliefs are challenged, fear and anxiety are created. In response to that, our psychological defenses kick in and they protect us from these emotions.  Denial, which is probably the most primitive psychological defense, is the one most likely to kick in when our beliefs are challenged.

It’s Easier to Deny the Truth

America is a powerful nation.  It has never been attacked.  We were confident.  We felt secure.  And all of a sudden, that security collapsed.  People started to be fearful with all of the rumors, with all of the news.  People didn’t know what to think, which is a very uncomfortable state to be in.  Eventually, our mind shuts off.   Just like when a computer is overloaded, our minds get overloaded.  We can’t handle it anymore and we shut down. It’s easier to deny it and move on with our lives.

What some will tend to do is deny the evidence that is coming our way and stick to the original story, the official story.  We try to regain our equilibrium that way. Another thing that we can do is decide to look at the conflicting evidence and be sincere and open minded, and look at both sides of the issue.  And, then make up our own mind about what reality is.

We Will Do Just About Anything to Defend our Mental and Emotional Homes

If we can think of our worldview as sort of being our mental and emotional home, I think that all of us will do just about anything to defend our homes, to defend our families.  I see that with people.  I saw that with myself when my brother tried to talk to me about it: “Don’t mess with me. Don’t mess with my home.  Don’t mess with my comfort with how things are.”

About a week later, I read a lengthy article by professor Griffin about why he believes the official account of 9/11 cannot be true.  It was a very well researched article.  I was in my office at the time.  I sat there and felt my stomach churning. I thought that maybe I was going to be sick. And, I leaped out my chair and ran out the door and took a long walk around the block – around several blocks – and just broke down.

I understand now that my worldview about my government being in some way my protector, like a parent, had been dashed.  It was like being cast out into the wilderness. I think that is the closest way to describe that feeling.

I sobbed and I sobbed.  I felt that the ground had completely disappeared beneath my feet.  And, I knew at some point during the walk that at some point I was going to have to become active educating other people about this.  For me to retain any sense of integrity, I was going to have to take some action.  I couldn’t just let something like this go.

9/11 Truth Challenges Our Fundamental Beliefs About the World

Many people respond to these truths in a very deep way.  Some have a visceral reaction like they have been punched in the stomach.  To begin to accept the responsibility that the government was involved is like opening Pandora’s Box.  If you open the lid and peak in a little bit, it’s going to challenge some of your fundamental beliefs about the world.

Initial Reactions to Hearing Contradictory Evidence about 9/11

Following are some of those spontaneous initial reactions to hearing the contradictory evidence about 9/11:

“I don’t want to know the truth or I will become too negative and psychologically go downhill.”

“I’m not sure that I want to know.  If this is true then up will be down and down will be up. My life will never be the same.”

I refuse to believe that that many Americans can be that treasonous.  Someone would have talked.”

Initial Reactions are Based on BELIEFS, NOT Scientific Facts

But these are BELIEFS.  They are NOT scientific fact.  But, these beliefs do KEEP US FROM LOOKING AT THE EMPIRICAL EVIDENCE.

9/11 Truth Contradicts People’s Paradigm

You have empirical people who will simply say: look at the evidence and if it is convincing, I will change my mind.

Other people are paradigmatic people. They have a paradigm.  They say, this is the way the world works, and I am convinced that this is the way that the world works.  9/11 doesn’t fit into that paradigm.  So, I don’t have to look at the evidence.  It’s paradigmatic.

And then there is a third type of person that we often call wishful thinkers.  I call it wishful and fearful thinking.  So, they simply will not believe something that they fear to be the truth.  And, I find that to be, maybe, the most powerful factor of people rejecting 9/11 truth and not even entertaining the evidence.

The Truth is Not Bearable

So, whenever we say “I refuse to believe”, we can be sure that the evidence that’s coming our way is not bearable, and it is conflicting with our worldview much too much.

Denial protects people from this kind of anxiety.

A Common Emotion is Fear

As I thought about all of these responses, I realized that what is common to every one of them is the emotion of fearPeople are afraid of being ostracized, they are afraid of being alienated, they are afraid of being shunned.  They are afraid of their lives being inconvenienced – they’ll have to change their lives. They are afraid of being confused.  They are afraid of psychological deterioration.  They are afraid of feeling helpless and vulnerable.  And, they are afraid that they won’t be able to handle the feelings coming up.

When Presented with the Truth, Those in Denial Become Angry, Indignant, Offended and Ridicule the Messenger

None of us want to feel helpless and vulnerable.  So, we want to defend ourselves.   And the way that we often do that is with anger.  Then we become angry.  And, when we become angry, then we become indignant.  We become offended.  We want to ridicule the messenger. We want to pathologize the messenger.  And, we want to censor the messenger.

Raise Awareness with Gentle Dialogue and Gentle Questioning

So, how can we overcome this resistance in denial?  The first thing is to meet people where they are at.

One thing is that we need to raise people’s awareness about this – what I would call gentle dialogue and gentle questioning…  It doesn’t work to challenge people’s beliefs or immediately tell them “I know the truth about 9/11.”  A good way is to ask open ended questions that lead to open dialogue and discussion about it.

One of the ways to deal with the trauma is to find the answers.  That’s why I think it is of such importance to have a comprehensive investigation.

Pride is Another Reason People Deny 9/11 Truth

I believe that to become the type of country that we think we are, we have to face some of the things that are not as we think they are… Thinking that we are above such things – that it could happen in other countries, but it couldn’t happen here – that’s a lack of humility.  That’s excessive pride.  As, so not being able to see our dark side or our weaknesses is the most dangerous thing.

The observation that pride is one of the basic human flaws is absolutely correct.  This is especially true for Americans because we for a long time looked at other nations and said, “They are in such bad shape.  But, luckily we don’t have those problems.  We don’t have leaders that would do those things that were done in the Soviet Union, or done in Germany, or done in Japan… This is a type of pride that Americans have.

A feature of American history that makes particularly liable to this pride is this notion of American exceptionalism – that America is the exceptional nation.  That began from the beginning as this country was formed.

People would say that there was so much evil in the European countries, so much cheating, so much lying, so much using the people for the ruler’s purposes.  But not in America! We have leaders who are free from those sins.  This has made 9/11 particularly difficult for Americans.

Everyone can make mistakes.  But, our ideals and our principles get us back on track.

9/11 is One of the Defining Issues of Our Time 

This is one of the defining issues of our time.

Questioning IS Patriotic

So, we need to understand that questioning is patriotic.  Questioning is what we are supposed to do.  That’s our duty.

The Real Perpetrators Must be Held Accountable

When we come to the national level, when something like 9/11 happens, we need to be sure that we have a real investigation into who the perpetrators are.  And, then we need to make sure that those people are held legally accountable. It’s part of the healing process on an individual level and the collective level.

End.

 

t/c to Gary Kohls, M.D.

 

thought control

Source of featured image:  http://www.veteranstoday.com/2014/01/13/mind-control-in-the-21st-century-science-fiction-beyond/ 

 

The free online full text of  

“Rape Of The Mind: The Psychology Of Thought Control” 

240 pages long, 18 chapters, with bibliography, published in 1956 and written by Joost A. M. Meerloo, M.D., Instructor in Psychiatry, Columbia University Lecturer in Social Psychology, New School for Social Research, Former Chief, Psychological Department, Netherlands Forces

Covering the topics of psychiatry, psychology, thought control, submission, confession, torture, conditioning, medication, brainwashing, menticide, totalitarianism, words, semantics, interrogation, courage, morale, treachery, treason

 

The first part of this book is devoted to various techniques used to make man a meek conformist. 

 The last chapter deals with the subtle psychological mechanisms of 
mental submission.

Children, Family, Individual, Mind, Society

Children, Family, Individual, Mind, Society

Those five words seem to comprise the theme that you will find explored below by a range of writers, artists, philosophers and psychology-oriented folk. 

Recently I’ve encountered two new web sites that seem refreshing, new, related (almost as if they are paired, or run by the same group of people). 

They are Zen Gardner and The MindUnleashed.

The first article in this listing offers important information I think everyone should have, learn and employ; I speak from experience.  The other articles are bundled here for your exploration and thought. 

I find them intriguing. Can millions of people be wrong about something?  

Read for yourself; make up your own mind. 

Respond there, or here, or to the universe, or in how you will change. 

[If, as Deepak Chopra says, your mind-body changes itself continually, then change seems unavoidable, but your genetic structure will simply build the new model to be just like the old model unless you instruct it differently. 

How do you instruct your DNA?]

 

Music video:

Father and Son

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zXwR0JGUCFI (4:03)

 

#1)

“We as human beings have a very strong self-centered aspect (even if it may not be truly ‘real’) of our beings called the ego, and many problems arise when this aspect of the human experience goes uncontrolled. Manipulation has always been a favored tool of the ego in order to get what it wants.

This manipulation can come in either a physical form or it can be seen to work on the emotional level in order to break the psyche into meeting the manipulator’s desires. Properly identifying the ways in which people emotionally manipulate others can save us much suffering in the future when identified early enough…..”

 

More:

http://themindunleashed.org/2014/09/8-ways-spot-emotional-manipulation-free.html 

 

#2)

“… If eliminating the family is indeed an objective of the New World Order project, then it is by no means an easy objective to achieve. One would be hard-pressed to imagine an institution that would be more fiercely defended than the family, or to imagine a more painful experience than being separated from one’s children or parents. Any campaign to achieve that objective would need to fly under false colors, not advertised as a campaign to eliminate the family, but rather as a campaign aimed at protecting the rights and welfare of the child.”

http://www.zengardner.com/mind-control-orwell-huxley-todays-reality/ 

http://www.workingtogetheronline.co.uk/images/assessment_triangle.png 

 

#3)

“… in the overlords’ view the children of the world must be made to conform to a system as limiting and spiritually confining as possible. This will include drugging, mind control, restrictive false education in militaristic institutions, treadmill like jobs, mindless diversions and constant propaganda.”

http://www.zengardner.com/truth-psyops-awakening/ 

 

 

Bonus Material!!

 

#4)

 

The Truth About Robin Williams

An hour-long video…. and read the comments too!

http://www.zengardner.com/truth-robin-williams-stefan-molyneux/ 

Very provocative and interesting, but a touch misogynistic?!

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stefan_Molyneux 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hypergamy 

http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=hypergamy 

The Greatest Gift in the Universe

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ArKPZyfZUFs (13:34)

It seems to me that blaming “the woman” [mother, wife] for one’s own weaknesses or failures is the inability to take responsibility for one’s own life.

 

 

#5)

 

Music video:

Daughters

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bp2bw87Rz2g 

(5:08)

 

 

 

On the other hand:

http://www.thefemininegift.org/2013/07/being-feminine-in-masculine-world.html 

http://media-cache-ak1.pinimg.com/736x/c0/30/7b/c0307b9da19088d62ca97b9ec30359fc.jpg 

 

#6) A similar web site to explore….    http://www.shift.is 

 

 

Music video:

Here in the dust

There’s not a trace of us

Everything is gone

But my heart is hanging on

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DwMsHwEBbgo&index=14&list=PLoGa3M7vHdvxabdt4uBt51e3W5Dt0tvsu 

(7:06)