Tag Archives: survival

uncertainty, crises, skill

uncertainty crises skill

I was feeling pretty good about the progress I’d made in the craft of writing — but then I read the first few pages of The Echo Maker by Richard Powers.   

In a recent re-arranging of office and library, the book had jumped into my hand: ‘remember me? This was set aside for later.  It’s later’

You can read all the kudos about it yourself but, for me, it’s a lesson in how to write and I shall enjoy finishing it. 

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If you’re into reading e-books, you might want to click on this link from booktalk’s bookbub 

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music compilations of jazz for studying, reading and working

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_jCyFVgmSSo 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tsD_yczGIg8 

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m9iWFHw5K84 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bn7Iwtf50FE 

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https://qz.com/886038/isaac-asimov-wrote-almost-500-books-in-his-lifetime-these-are-the-6-ways-he-did-it/ 

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There are lots of lessons in writing on my bookshelves, including the course of writing creative nonfiction and the as-yet-unfinished brilliant-but-difficult-to-slog-through Building Great Sentences. 

And the fifty-odd books on the craft, plus all the handbooks, thesauri, dictionaries, and other tools.   And the 45 e-mails from writing craft groups tucked away for safe-keeping.  And the list of writing “assignments” from within the book The Butterfly Hours, whose author Patty Dann taught a class at a local writer’s collaborative. 

I added sixteeen of the topics listed on pages 128-129 to my own personal file of topics to write about; so far I’ve finished five of them.

 

Here’s one:

http://www.daskeyboard.com/blog/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/Duplex-Typewriter-Jewett-Antique-Typewriters-284×300.jpg

My functionality with the typewriter started in high school, the easy (?) elective of touch typing class in which I labored but never really learned. I could not break myself of the habit of having to look at the keys, nor could I master using more than one finger and one thumb per hand. I did not have a typewriter at home; all high school papers were done in cursive. 

Today, cursive is a dinosaur. 

Today, typewriters are a dinosaur. 

Soon, even typing will be a thing of the past. 

http://www.svsd.net/cms/lib5/PA01001234/Centricity/Domain/831/class_old.jpg

I made a significant leap forward when I worked the graveyard shift in college for a telephone answering service.  While there was some limited ability for sleep, I used the time — the phones went silent except for important calls from the hospital to the physicians, or calls for urgent service by towtrucks, or when the ambulance company was out on a call and I had to answer the line — to type up my college papers. I got through much of high school and almost all of college on the ability to write an expository paper. They had to be typed.  And my employer had an IBM Selectric.

All I had to do was to pay for the ribbons. 

http://i.ebayimg.com/00/s/MTM2MlgxNDEz/z/5~MAAOSwaG9XJT1g/$_35.JPG?set_id=2

By the time I got out of college, society’s approach to letters was changing.  Some genius who worked for An Wang created the word processor:

https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/originals/f2/75/26/f27526d94676fc4338bf445c17cf285b.jpg

My father, who tracked job markets for the state department of commerce, wrote to the company on behalf of my niece, then in high school, to ask the company what the new tool was all about.  He got an answer, which I preserved in my archives somewhere, from some recent high school grad who worked for the p.r. department at the company in Lowell, MA whose office towers still command a major gateway to the city. 

The letter is a classic. It will probably bring serious dollars on an Antique Roadshow in the year 2035.

The company has long since fallen to the vagaries of competition and change, but the basic functionality of the word processing system is that the typist could make changes to the document before it got printed, thus eliminating typographic errors, bad grammar, and even bad writing. The letter is a classic because it was produced on a Wang 1200 but had so many examples of typographical errors, bad grammar and bad writing that it seemed like a parody of itself. 

I first used a Wang word processor right after I took the job marketing a medical symposium; with a Wang WP, I could print out individually-typed-and-addrerssed letters to hundreds and hundreds of addresses.  My bosses thought I was a wizard. I needed only to sit by and maintain the feed, pull off the product, fold it up, and stuff it into the envelopes. Some fellow named Nierenberg ( Andrea’s father ) had already taught me the value and art of personalized direct marketing.  Soon thereafter, I was running a one-day seminar to introduce computers to physicians; I was utterly dumbfounded when some of the brightest people I’d ever known would only very tentatively approach the subject or even touch the input device. They were mini-masters at trauma surgery but how to make a brain-in-a-box sing and dance was new to them.

Sometime thereafter I went to worked for a start-up producing cable TV shows for pediatricians and the company handed me the latest in IBM computers; I never could figure out to use the damn thing. But that never held me back; we got 15 shows in the can and I was already at work on a new franchise for orthopaedic surgeons when they informed me that I was fired because I’d failed to sell enough air time to advertisers, a task that was nowhere mentioned in my job description. 

A few years later, I took over running an association of business executives who worked for companies like Prime and Digital Equipment.  On the first two days of the job, the office staff told me the annual invoices for membership (the organization’s first and major source of income) were due to go out and the DEC system with its 10-inch floppies couldn’t be made to merge the membership database with the invoice form. Calls to the nearby company proved useless; the technical support staffer sent over by our very own internal contact through our vice president and their international director proved useless. 

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/e/e3/Macintosh_128k_transparency.png/200px-Macintosh_128k_transparency.png

A quick phone call and some research turned up the idea that we could buy an Apple Mcintosh with custom-made software for association management tasks for $5,000 proved irresistible, thus earning me enmity with the Board that I could never outrun. 

The Mac ran faultlessly for the 14 months I was there. The invoices were sent out with a three-day delay, thus saving the corporation’s sizeable capital equity, enough so they could purchase an office condo after I left, but I got run out on a rail. 

But I had found Apple, bought two for my kids to use in high school and later college, and when my son moved out of the house in his senior year, I had a tool I could learn to use on my desk. I wish I’d had the cash to buy stock. Sorry, Joe. 

When I again found myself unemployed because I’d mastered a DOS computyer so well that I made more money at ten cents a line than my department director, I started drafting an e-book on performance psychology

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I once met a girl (or should I say she once met me?), and we talked until two and then she said it’s time for bed and crawled off to sleep (if she could) surrounded by her daughter and her dog. 

But while she was awake, she convinved me to take a Briggs-Myers psychometric test that, when it was completed, told me I was an iNTp who loves play, languages, and complex systems, amd specially games that coax analogies, patterns and theories from the unseen. So it’s no surprise that I’ve had a fascination for wargaming.  One of those nights we talked about her desire to run off 900 miles on a whim to help take care of people in a major disaster, but I talked her out of it.  It took me two hours, after which she challenged me (nop, she held my feet to the fire until it was finished and found a home) to write this

Some people think this nation is headed into a crisis larger than any its faced in 80 years (a major disaster), and the world has changed a lot since the Depression era. See the three articles below or scroll quickly through the last handful of entries at Occurrences Foreign & Domestic

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https://www.oathkeepers.org/crisis-end-kurt-schlichter-lays-lefts-violent-endgame/ 

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http://www.globalresearch.ca/planetary-lockdown-geoengineering-and-the-deep-state/5574404 

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http://thewellpreparedmama.com/52-survival-skills-your-kids-should-be-learning/ 

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No matter how your glasses are tintedI’m just going to park these here  for easy access and safe-keeping so I (and you) can watch them at your leisure.  

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Crisis Management Wargaming (4)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qr_1O75185o 

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The Secret to Successful Crisis Management in the 21st Century – Melissa Agnes TEDx Talk

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VQGEPEaEWtg (18)

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How to write the best crisis management plan for your business by Tony Ridley (13)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=seO-GJ7J0G4 

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Better Risk Assessments, Management, Tools and Metrics by Tony Ridley (15)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eD2mQ6ooYO4 

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How to Conduct a Tabletop Exercise (18)

A tutorial for campus administrators and crisis response team members

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1XK_dZkb9Kw 

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https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=incident+management+simulation 

 

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At the Wargaming Table: Tactics – Strategy – Game Theory (40)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lUOJBCmqGcY 

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In this lecture during the 2013 Yale Presidential Inauguration Symposia, University Provost Polak offers a sample of his popular undergraduate economics course. As the William C. Brainard Professor of Economics, he is an expert on decision theory, game theory, and economic history. His work explores how individuals choose when faced with uncertainty and how societies choose when faced with inequality.

[67 minutes]

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M3oWYHYoBvk 

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“Ceptre: A Language for Modeling Generative Interactive Systems” by Chris Martens

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bFeJZRdhKcI 

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“I See What You Mean” 

by Peter Alvaro

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R2Aa4PivG0g 

I love query languages for many reasons, but mostly because of their semantics. Wait, come back! In contrast to most systems programming languages (whose semantics can be quite esoteric), the semantics of a query (given some inputs) are precisely its outcome — rows in tables. Hence when we write a query, we directly engage with its semantics: we simply say what we mean. This makes it easy and natural to reason about whether our queries are correct: that is, whether they mean what we intended them to mean.

Query languages have traditionally been applied to a relatively narrow domains: historically, data at rest in data stores; more recently, data in motion through continuous, “streaming” query frameworks. Why stop here? Could query languages do for a notoriously complex domain such as distributed systems programming what they have done so successfully for data management? How would they need to evolve to become expressive enough to capture the programs that we need to write, while retaining a simple enough semantics to allow mere mortals to reason about their correctness?

I will attempt to answer these questions (and raise many others) by describing a query language for distributed programming called Dedalus. Like traditional query languages, Dedalus abstracts away many of the details we typically associate with programming, making data and time first-class citizens and relegating computation to a subordinate role, characterizing how data is allowed to change as it moves through space and time. As we will see, this shift allows programmers to directly reason about distributed correctness properties such as consistency and fault-tolerance, and lays the foundations for powerful program analysis and repair tools (such as Blazes and LDFI), as well as successive generations of data-centric programming languages (including Bloom, Edelweiss and Eve).

Peter Alvaro

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA SANTA CRUZ

@palvaro

Peter Alvaro is an Assistant Professor of Computer Science at the University of California Santa Cruz. His research focuses on using data-centric languages and analysis techniques to build and reason about data-intensive distributed systems, in order to make them scalable, predictable and robust to the failures and nondeterminism endemic to large-scale distribution. Peter is the creator of the Dedalus language and co-creator of the Bloom language.

While pursuing his PhD at while UC Berkeley, Peter co-developed and taught Programming the Cloud, an undergraduate course that explored distributed systems concepts through the lens of software development. Prior to attending Berkeley, Peter worked as a Senior Software Engineer in the data analytics team at Ask.com. Peter’s principal research interests are databases, distributed systems and programming languages.

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http://www.techrepublic.com/article/understanding-the-differences-between-ai-machine-learning-and-deep-learning/ 

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https://hypothes.is/blog/annotation-is-now-a-web-standard/ 

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http://edutips.eu 

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https://qz.com/911681/we-tested-apples-siri-amazon-echos-alexa-microsofts-cortana-and-googles-google-home-to-see-which-personal-assistant-bots-stand-up-for-themselves-in-the-face-of-sexual-harassment/ 

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http://www.cohack.life/posts/what-is-transcendence-technology/ 

Alignment of Purpose

The final part of an extended article entitled

Getting Beyond:

Finding Purpose and Vitality After Enduring Systemic Insult

The first three sections are here:

http://boydownthelane.com/2014/05/01/getting-beyond/ 

http://www.thesullenbell.com/2014/05/01/excerpts-deep-survival/

http://www.thesullenbell.com/2014/05/01/excerpts-surviving-survival/

 

Alignment of Purpose

 

 

What we tell ourselves,

in the quiet of our own mind,

is the key.

 

 

 

There is much yet to be said about this topic, which spreads across affirmations, self-talk, the nature of the music one listens to, and much much more. What do you feed your brain? You believe what you say to yourself for fairly obvious reasons, though a lot of people don’t “grok” the concepts very well.  First, your body/mind has been listening to your voice for a long time, and it recognizes and responds to that voice instinctively and instantaneously.  Second, the source of your voice is deeply embedded within your body; the vocal chords in your throat, the resonance of your abdominal expulsion of air, the rhythms and resonance vibrating directly through the boy jaw right into the bony stirrups of your ear and along the outside of your skull.

[For more, see  Smart Moves: Why Learning is Not All In Your Head, Carla Hannaford, Ph.D., Great Ocean Publishers, Arlington, VA 1995. [The author is a nationally- recognized neuropsychologist and educator. This is a fascinating, very readable and important book on neuroscience, educational kinesiology and the brain/body connection as it affects us in learning, in performance, at work, and in society. It explains several basic BrainGym exercises, very simple techniques anyone can use to enhance their lives in innumerable ways.]

 

 

For further reflection:

“A fascinating corollary is [the] discovery that not only a lack of communication between individuals but the quality of that communication influences the cardiac system of the human being. Using state-of-the-art equipment to measure blood pressure surges during certain kinds of dialogue, Dr. Lynch has found that negative language – abusive, angry, loud, denigrating – when used repeatedly, and especially early in childhood, can have a devastating effect on the heart of the individual to whom it is directed. “Lethal talk”, Dr. Lynch posits, therefore can be just as much a factor in heart disease as exercise, diet, or cholesterol levels. Negative talk and loneliness, then, can negatively affect our health and, potentially, our lifespan as meaningful human relationships can in the opposite direction.

Although Dr. Lynch focuses on the psychological and emotional factors of loneliness and lethal talk and their relationship to cardiac health, he does not address the vibrational or resonance aspects of both physical proximity of electromagnetic fields and the sounds of conversation. Is it possible, for example, that when the energetic fields of two hearts are near one another that they actually entrain?

Rhythm entrainment, also known as sympathetic vibration, or simply resonance occurs when two wave-forms of similar frequency “lock into phase” with each other. The waves actually oscillate together at exactly the same rate. Two oscillating vibrations, if they are near enough to one another in frequency, will eventually entrain. An example of this is what happens when clocks in a clock store are wound, with their pendulums set in motion. At first the tick tock of the pendulums’ sway is just slightly off but eventually every clock falls into rhythm with the others as they become entrained.

This principle of rhythm entrainment can also occur with one wave triggering a vibration in a resting source such as when a violin string can be tuned to a certain pitch by playing another violin string set to the same pitch nearby. This is how tuning forks are used in remote control television units. The TV is remotely activated by pushing a button on the remote control unit which strikes a tone that entrains with a tone in the unit….

Have you ever felt the energy in the room shift when two or more individuals seem to be “on the same wavelength”?

http://www.collectivewisdominitiative.org/papers/levi_sentient.htm 

 

 

music video: 

I Can’t Get Started 

(Art Blakey & The Jazz Messengers

(“A Child’s Dance”) (Woody Shaw on trumpet) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=97NGOo92Tak 

 

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We are what we think. What we are (and what will we will become) starts from within our thoughts. With our thoughts, we create our reality. Virtually all of our behavioral patterns are generated from the unconscious naming or categorization of our prior experiences. Much of what we believe about ourselves is based upon erroneous conclusions we have drawn due to how subjectively we interpreted and experience. We prevent positive outcomes for ourselves because we imagine that we have been slighted, or judged, or doubted, or criticized, or been found to be deficient in some way. Repetitive experience of this type leaves traces upon our subconscious mind. If we tell ourselves frequently that we are worthy, or unattractive, or clumsy, or at fault, or any of a range of negative self-perceptions in a variety of forms, then we will form identifications with those characteristics.

Identifications (how we see ourselves) are etched into the subconscious.

At the core of every identification is a subjective belief.

Beliefs generate attitudes. Our experiences related to our beliefs

Attitudes generate feelings.

Feelings generate thoughts.

Thoughts generate action.

At the root of every identification is a belief. This is a statement of relative truth that generates a series of attitudes, feelings, thoughts and behaviors. The subconscious mind will hold onto pattern the programming and become locked in, seemingly inaccessible. We can and do believe something, or act a certain way , without a clue as to why. Our minds have a built in sentinel which guards the mental file cabinet where we store our identifications and beliefs. It acts as a filter so that nothing can be filed in that file cabinet that does not already conform with the identifications and beliefs there are ready there. (Psychologists call it “the critical factor”.)

You can gain access to your subconscious, to that file cabinet of core belief, when your mind’s filtering sentinel can be made to step aside through the use of effective progressive relaxation techniques. The identifications and beliefs that do not serve you can be overcome and replaced. You can choose to give yourself positive messages that will generate positive experience and reality.

See

Body Mind Mastery: Creating Success in Sport and Life, Dan Millman, New World Library, Novato, California, 1999. [Millman is a former world champion on the trampoline, a Hall of Fame gymnast, a coach and a university professor. This is a revision of his earlier book The Inner Athlete.]

The Artist’s Way, Julia Cameron with Mark Bryan, Jeremy Tarcher/G. P. Putnam Books, New York, 1992. [A path for uncovering or unblocking your innate creativity.]

This all has to do with the harmony within one’s self, as well as the harmony that can be extended to others, within community, and within nature and the cosmos.

 

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“People appear to think in conjunction or partnership with others and with the help of culturally provided tools and implements. Cognitions, it would seem, are not content-free tools that are brought to bear on this or that problem; rather, they emerge in a situation tackled by teams of people and tools available to them… What characterizes such daily events of thinking is that the social and artifactual surrounds, alleged to be ‘outside’ the individual’s heads, not only are sources of stimulation and guidance but are actually vehicles of thought. Moreover, the arrangements, functions, and structures of these surrounds change in the process to become genuine parts of the learning that results from the cognitive partnership with them. In other words, it is not just the ‘person- solo’ who learns, but the ‘person-plus’, the whole system of interrelated factors.”

 

“No distribution without individual cognition: a dynamic interaction of view”, G. Salomon, in Distributed Cognitions — Psychological and Educational Considerations, Cambridge University Press, 1993 G. Salomon (ed.), as noted by Mark K. Smith, Learning and Organizations, at www.infed.org/biblio/organizational-learning.htm.

 

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“… learning results in the construction of nodes and relations….”

How does this apply to (or how is it applied by) the super-empowered individual?

“Three types of learning are particularly interesting from an organizational perspective: communication-based, experience-based, and expectation- based.

In communication-based learning, individuals learn about tasks, people, organizations, etc. by observing or being told. The information garnered in this way is expected to be new or novel to the learner.

Experiential learning has its basis in task repetition and feedback. There are several sources for this experience: the communication of previous results, increased familiarity, increased physical skill, prior problem-solving.

Finally, expectation-based learning occurs when individuals engage in planning, thinking ahead about the future, and then use these expectations as a basis for future reasoning.

From a network perspective, learning results in the construction of nodes and relations.”

 

“On The Evolution of Social and Organizational Networks”, Kathleen M. Carley, Carnegie Mellon University, in Steven B. Andrews and David Knoke (eds.), Vol. 16 Special Issue of Research in the Sociology of Organizations on “Networks In and Around Organizations,”, JAI Press, Inc, Stamford, CT, pp. 3-20.

(http://www.casos.cs.cmu.edu/events/summer_institute/2001/reading_list/pdf/EvolutionofNetworks.pdf).

 

 

 

From Body-Mind Psychotherapy: Principles, Techniques & Practical Applications, Susan Aposhyan, W. W. Norton & Co., 2004:

“In my book Natural Intelligence,: body-mind immigration and human development (1998), I distilled six principles which underlie body-mind integration in any context. These principles are: respect, full participation, inclusivity, dialogue, sequencing, and development. [Otherwise] we are merely using our bodies to perform mechanical functions and thereby contributing to body-mind the synchronization.” [Page 15]

“Throughout the development of human cultures, as visions of how to live grew more complex in some parts of the world, in order to manifest those visions, industrialized nations came to dominate more of the natural world–including other humans. Body-minded dualism is part and parcel of this domination. In the act of dominating, we forgot our bodily connection with the other. In the act of being dominated, we became fragmented, losing touch with the vitality of our own subjectivity. This fragmentation increases cyclically; it is far easier to dominate a fragmented creature….” [Page 24]

“The development of modern mouth, teeth and tongue allowed us to articulate in so much detail and free up our hands even further. We could now speak and do at the same time….” [page 25]

“As cellular life evolved from colonies of cells to multicellular organisms, a new form of communication evolved–vascular communication. While still relying on chemical messengers, vascular systems provided organized, fluid channels of communication that both sped up and directed the communication process within within an organism (Margulis and Sagan, 1986). Our circulatory systems are still fundamental to communication within the human organism.” [Page 36]

The amygdala

“As we have come to understand the amygdala and its role in fear and other emotional reactions, we have recognized that it can receive and react to pertinent sensory data before the prefrontal lobe has had time to completely receive and process the input. In other words before we recognize the stick in our path as not being a snake, we have already jumped out of its way.  Our lower brain functions recognized that this stick could be a snake. It is adaptive to jump first, evaluate later. Not only does the prefrontal lobe receive and respond to the sensory data more slowly — as it is further way from the sensory input with many more synaptic connections to complete, it is also has a relatively weak ability to control the amygdala response. The prefrontal lobe has fewer and slower connections into the amygdala than the amygdala has to the prefrontal lobe. This makes the effect of the amygdala on the prefrontal lobe both quicker and stronger than the effect of the prefrontal lobe on the amygdala.

Understanding this brain circuitry helps explain why our emotional intensity can easily overcome our rational perspective. The degree to which this is true seems to vary with individuals and is a fundamental aspect of temperament.

Furthermore, this mechanism can be strengthened in either direction through practice and experience. This tendency for emotional intensity to overcome the rational frontal lobe is especially salient in dealing with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), psychosis, addictions, and adolescence. In these situations, the prefrontal lobe is already operating at a disadvantage. Thus, the emotional intensity generated by the amygdala can more easily overpowered.

Polyvagal theory

In the evolution of the motion, mammalian behavior is distinct due to the centrality of bonding and parental care. Some argue that this evolutionary legacy has placed relationality at the center of our emotional processing.   Stephen Porges (1995), director of the brain-body center at the University Illinois, has developed a poly-vagal theory of autonomic nervous system regulation that places the roots of social engagement in the brainstem, at the very foundation of our neurological regulation.

According to his theory, human autonomic regulation has 3 tiers of operations.” [They consist of immobilization; sympathetic arousal response of fight or flight; and, finally, the social engagement system. ]  “This system involves the ventral root of the vagus nerve as well as aspects of other cranial nerves. Together these nerves in their respective nuclei in the brainstem control bonding and engaging behaviors, such as facial expression, localization, listening, and sucking.

In a state of social engagement…, heart and respiratory rate vary…, [as does facial muscle tone which controls ears noses eyes and more, enabling] “the ability to respond with a variety of behaviors. This variability is essential to engagement. It could be seen as a fundamental aspect of responsivity or attunement….” [Pages 40-44]

 

 

And then, as if it were a coda, in response to a comment I’d made, Laurence Gonzales said I should check out “the polyvagal theory”.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TnfKmNRfLYU (2:27)

 

It turns out I’d heard of the theory before and even included it in a slice of my “Summon The Magic” material, replicated above.

And Gonzales was right again, I discovered, when I  re-examined Porges and his theory, this time in depth, and having a deeper understanding of what Porges means, what the theory is about, what it tells us about how we humans are constructed, and that it holds the key to our re-generation after trauma.

My return from West Virginia, my re-engagement with my wife and kids, my focusing on getting the “Summon The Magic” material in shape and online, and my looking for new ways to learn and get involved and engaged, are my examples. I got beyond the physical and emotional trauma of my dance with intensive care, my rehabilitative process, and found some answers to “What now?”.  I focused on restoring or keeping what health I had. WIth the kitchen empty and the wife still working 14-hour days, I focused on cooking. I bought an instructional cookbook from the Culinary Institute of America, watched cooking shows, and played in the kitchen as an artist in love. We got the kitchen re-modeled. I started to assemble some instructional tools on learning how to play the piano or electronic keyboard. I bought a new computer, got re-invested in blogging, and ended up transitioning my blog to a new host with a new approach. And I’ve put 9/11 and such things behind me, in the sense that I no longer feel obsessed, no longer have the need to chase down every detail, eliminate the doubts and variables in every piece of disinformation, or classify and categorize every one who posts on the Internet. I still watch and post about such things on the news,  obviously, but there are spaces and gaps now, places and times when I can turn away and invest my self in something else.

Each of us has to do this in his or her own way, when we are ready… again not for the sake of letting go of our awareness and activism, but in harnessing it to better ends with better tools and in learning to live a life in our own way that is contrapuntal and antithetical to “the evilarchy” that has brought us to the cliffside of brutal totalitarianism, economic collapse, and world war. 

Below the calligraphic break is a section devoted to Porges and his theory with more links for your exploration to the depth of your own interest.

 

In his article on love and our emergent autonomic nervous system

[ http://www.craniosacrale.it/pdf/dainfo/love_paper.pdf ],

Stephen Porges, Ph.D. explains our innate human neurobehavioral system and the way it promotes an alternative to the flight/fright mechanism by promoting social contact and communication.

His polyvagal theory describes the enervation of the branchiomeric muscles which control our facial expressions, listening and vocalization, our head tilts and all the  other very subtle elements that are intimately involved in the communication of affect.

These are the tools of engagement and interaction within the social environment (although these require face-to-face contact, not social media contact).

These same internal systems also communicate with our heart and with our gastro-intestinal system which are intimately connected with the brain, the heart and the body’s hormonal regulation mechanisms. This triad is inseparable and is deeply integrated with our abilities for cooperative and shared responsibilities of survival, the transmission of cultural values, and with physical safety.

Love, which is incompatible with fear, may have evolved to bypass slower, more tedious, and often unsuccessful processes of communication and social engagement.

For more, click on this pdf link: The Polyvagal Theory 

 

A Short Video:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EGDMXvdwN5c (3:59)

 

ABC’s Sydney Lupkin calls it a “fake”, but maybe a placebo is a more correct term. 

http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/health/2014/04/09/doves-latest-ad-entails-tricking-women-to-wear-fake-beauty-patches/ 

RumblePitch tweets — inside the story — that it’s degrading for all intelligent women but then, on the other hand, intelligent women would know how to use their own minds in a manner that improves their well-being and, maybe, just maybe, some people need to be educated about how that works.

This is what I’ve been trying to do with “Summon The Magic” and, while my own direct applications have been focused on helping one individual be able to hit home runs seemingly at will, and in another case helping a post-Olympic pitcher [Danielle “Harry” Henderson] get over the simple psychological hurdle of making an error every time the ball was hit back to her [“Thanks… it worked!”, she told me a year later], it’s simply about opening up the door to the idea that the power of the brain can be focused on any issue the brain’s owner wants it to be.

Here are chunks of the old e-book “Summon The Magic”:

the Bibliography pdf,

Mind Map 2013 pdf

ActionMapping pdf

Team Chemistry pdf

Get Going

 

 

The state of loneliness can be crippling, and though majority of people don’t find themselves consumed by it, they do feel its effects as their inner worlds shrink and dry up.

According to the 65-year-old Indian-born American physician, the only real answer to loneliness is to experience your own fullness, and only then can you be sure that you will not look inside one day to find holes, gaps, unanswered fears and a sense of lack.

A few steps that enable an individual to become true to themselves have also been given, the Huffington Post reported.

Step one is to have a vision that you devote time to every day – according to happiness experts, the best way to have a happy life is to have a happy day. Chopra has modified this a little bit and said that the best way to have a happy life is to have a happy day that looks forward to tomorrow as the future is something you build toward and the place where you build is inside yourself.

Step two consists of putting yourself in a context for fulfilment – the solitary life is suitable for very few people and the vast majority prefer social connections. We all have them if yours are the kind that doesn’t fulfil you emotionally, the whole value of relationship is being missed.

Proximity isn’t the same as bonding. There is a sliding scale for bonding, from least to most intimate, which is as follows:

Relationships exist for the purpose of mutual fulfillment, but if they exist for other reasons like status, financial security, feeling wanted or meeting the social norm, it’s not the same as being true to yourself deep down and allowing intimacy to move into the region of the soul.

Lastly, view your life as a process, a never-ending journey – as long as you live between the end points of birth and death, life is like a conveyor belt heading inexorably for a black tunnel. The only time that never ages is the present moment.

Living in the moment has become a spiritual cliche, but it isn’t always a useful one. The now becomes eternal only when it is full, when your being is enough to sustain you, complete fullness is at hand and when just being here elicits bliss, you are timeless.

http://www.dnaindia.com/lifestyle/report-deepak-chopra-reveals-how-to-fight-loneliness-1781879

 

Random Acts of Kindness caught on film

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oeph_eX_pVw&list=PLxr6alg-YpQYPINmZkZuGl8xxN1HDOOkz (5:27)

 

music video (must be watched for its explanatory graphics)

Oh Come, Emmanuel

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ozVmO5LHJ2k&list=PLxr6alg-YpQYPINmZkZuGl8xxN1HDOOkz (4:36)

 

 

From “Deep Survival”

The appendix of the book starting on page 278 offers up the condensed rules”.

 

The rules of adventure:

Perceive, believe, then act. Guess well. Avoid the “four poisons of the mind”: fear, confusion, hesitation, and surprise. Hesitation. [My sports psychology reading taught me a very simple mantra which continues to remain deeply embedded and yet available: “Don’t  discriminate in the midst of action”.] Stop, think, observe, plan, and then act.

Avoid impulsive behavior; don’t hurry.

Know your stuff.

Get the information.

Commune with the dead. “If you could collect the debt around you and sit by the campfire and listen to their tails, you might find yourself in the middle of the best survival school of all.”

Be humble.

When in doubt, bail out.

 

The rules of survival:

Number One: Perceive; believe (look, see, believe).

Number Two: Stay calm (use humor, use fear to focus).

Number Three: Think/analyze/plan (get organized; set up small, manageable tasks;).

Number Four: Take correct, decisive action (be bold and cautious while carrying out tasks).

Number Five: Celebrate your successes (take joy in completing tasks).

Number Six: Count your blessings (be grateful–you’re alive).

Number Seven: Play (sing, play mind games, recite poetry,  count anything, do mathematical problems in your head).

Number Eight: See the beauty (remember: it’s a vision quest).

Number Nine: Believe that you will succeed (develop a deep conviction that you make real).

Number Ten: Surrender (let go of your fear of dying; “put away the pain”).

Number Eleven: Do whatever is necessary (be determined; have the will and the skill).

Number Twelve: Never give up (let nothing break your spirit).

 

Mark Knopfler – True Love Will Never Fade

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8cDxnbDfgYA (4:28)

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[with a big tip of the cap to A. Peasant]

http://www.sott.net/article/142725-Limbic-Warfare-and-Martha-Stouts-Paranoia-Switch

http://www.c-span.org/video/?199990-1/book-discussion-paranoia-switch

http://www.publishersweekly.com/978-0-374-22999-3

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“Life is precious and irreplaceable. Even severe incurable illness can often be temporarily fixed, moderated, or controlled…. In chess, to resign is to give up the game with pieces and options remaining.  My version of DNR is “Do Not Resign”.

Don’t give up on me if I can still think, communicate, create, and enjoy life. When taking care of me, take care of yourself as well, to make sure you don’t burn out by the time I need your optimism the most.

It’s so easy to let someone die, but it takes effort, determination, and stamina to help someone stay and feel alive.”

 

Boris Veysman, M.D. [ http://rwjms.rutgers.edu/emergency_medicine/faculty/profiles/veysmanb.html ], in the journal Health Affairs,

cited on page 207 of Your Medical Mind: How to Decide What Is Right for You http://www.amazon.com/Your-Medical-Mind-Decide-Right/dp/B00CVDO05U , Jerome Groopman, M.D., and Pamela Hartzband, M.D., Penguin 2012.

 

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From the Nag Hammadi library, the Book of Thomas, Christ tells us “For whoever does not know self does not know anything, but whoever knows self already has acquired knowledge about the depth of the universe”.

Compare this with a tract from the Upanishads, the Indian metaphysical treatise on self-realization:

“It is not by argument that the self is known…. Distinguish the self from the body and mind. The self, the atman, the highest refuge of all, pervades the Universe and dwells in the hearts of all. Those who are instructed in the self and who practice constant meditation attain that changeless and self-effulgent atman (spirit/self). Do Thou Likewise, for bliss eternal lies before you….”

http://www.sol.com.au/kor/8_01.htm 

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http://snippits-and-slappits.blogspot.com/2014/04/18-things-highly-creative-people-do.html

 

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“…. for god’s sake, one can’t spend untold hours chewing blogospherical cud when there is a real life to be lived out there in the real world….”

Chris Floyd

 On Data Dumps, Death States and “Respectable” Dissent

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“You only have power over people so long as you don’t take everything away from them. But when you’ve robbed a man of everything he ‘s no longer in your power–he’s free again.”

Alexander Solzhenitsyn 

ATTRIBUTION DETAIL »

Read more at http://quotes.dictionary.com/source/bobynin_in_the_first_circle_1968?page=1#QogthHx4ItgqQg3o.99

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There is a tearsheet used as a bookmark in my copy of Civil Disobedience which notes an excerpt from the book The power highway: Saga of a desperate Southern gentleman, 1955-1967” (Dillard, 1997) (edited by Douglas Brinkley), and which reads, underneath the title in bold red

 “Fear and Loathing…”:

On the night of November 22, 1963, the day John F. Kennedy was assassinated, Hunter Thompson wrote to his friend William Kennedy from his home in Woody Creek, Colorado. The letter contains the earliest known use of his signature phrase “fear and loathing”. An excerpt follows.

….There is no human being within 500 miles to whom I can communicate anything–much less the fear and loathing that is on me after today’s burner….The killing has put me in a state of shock. The rages troubled….This is the end of reason, the dirtiest are in our time. I mean to come down from the hills and enter the fray….No more fair play. From now on it is dirty pool and judo in the clinches. The savage nuts have shattered the greatness of American decency. They can count me in – I feel ready for a dirty game….

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The Sacred Ritual of Walking: Venkat Rao explains, for the benefit of us un-spiritual types, that sacred rituals are of four types: grounding, centring, connecting, and collecting. He then provides an intriguing exercise to assess which type most appeals to you.

When the Purpose of Meeting is Not to Agree on Actions: My friend Amanda Fenton summarizes some great thoughts on the value of conversation, connection and networking that yields no action plans, decisions or “solutions”. Sometimes, sharing and listening and learning is enough; sometimes, “the dialogue is the action”.

 

“Don’t turn your face away.

Once you’ve seen, you can no longer act like you don’t know.

Open your eyes to the truth. It’s all around you.

Don’t deny what the eyes to your soul have revealed to you.

Now that you know, you cannot feign ignorance.

Now that you’re aware of the problem, you cannot pretend you don’t care.

To be concerned is to be human.

To act is to care.”

― Vashti Quiroz-Vega

http://howtosavetheworld.ca/2014/01/28/ 

 

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Accepting reality

Americans’ Mental Health is Latest Victim of Changing Climate (Op-Ed)

An excerpt:

“When you have an environmental insult, the burden of mental health disease is far greater than the physical,” said Steven Shapiro, a Baltimore psychologist who directs the program on climate change, sustainability and psychology for the nonprofit Psychologists for Social Responsibility (PsySR). “It has a much larger effect on the psyche. Survivors can have all sorts of issues: post traumatic stress disorder, depression, anxiety, relationship issues, and academic issues among kids.”

 

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“The wound is the place where the Light enters you.” 

Rumi 

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http://metrouk2.files.wordpress.com/2012/06/article-1338546439171-1366017e000005dc-116469_466x310.jpg 

In 2009, Rachel Weisz expressed her views on Botox to Harper’s Bazaar – “It should be banned for actors, as steroids are for sportsmen. Acting is all about expression; why would you want to iron out a frown?“[109]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rachel_Weisz

 

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http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-3JIAsVgrwuo/UxreysiCZJI/AAAAAAAB0fY/NkO2xHQREaI/s1600/h60_n.jpg 

 

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There is no prosthetic for an amputated spirit.

Lt. Col. Frank Slade (blind from a foolish accident with a grenade)(From the movie “The Scent of a Woman”)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZN0rMmUxUMI (0:08)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F2zTd_YwTvo (4:30)

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“Happiness is the full use of your powers along lines of excellence.”

John F. Kennedy, citing Plato

See also page 159

Your Unfinished Life: The Classic and Timeless Guide to Finding Happiness and Success Through Kindness

by Lawrence J. Danks

http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/your-unfinished-life-lawrence-j-danks/1014434870?ean=9780615242071 

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“… Only the wealthy can afford to have someone else fix their bicycle, walk and wash their dog, change the oil in their car, repair their house, etc. Practical skills enable an individual or household to lower the cost of living to the point that savings (capital accumulation) is possible. Practical skills are human capital, which is the means of production in a knowledge economy…..”

http://www.washingtonsblog.com/2014/04/losing-practical-life-skills.html 

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There are two books in my bibliography for the never-quite-got-off-the-ground effort I called “Summon The Magic” that I recommend first and foremost for students and parents, students for the obvious reason that they have evidenced some desire to learn something useful and parents in the hopes that they would buy one for their kids (and read it when the kid was doing something else).

One of those books has this description in my list:

The Everyday Work of Art: How Artistic Experience Can Transform Your Life, Eric Booth, Sourcebooks, Napierville, Illinois 1997. [At the foundation of Summon The Magic, the concepts in this book should be taught to every high school student; written by an individual who has achieved unparalleled success in the fields of music, the performing arts and business.] [Having been recognized by many educators as an outstanding book, it has been re-published by Authors’ Guild Back-in-Print (iUniverse.com) (ISBN 0-595-19380-3) with the new subtitle “Awakening the Extraordinary in Your Daily Life”.]

There are many rich tidbits to be drawn from this book. He talks about developing own’s own hall of masters, the select few with whom you’d like to have a conversation, a dinner, or some form of deeper relationship. [He’s on my list.]  The second is a little meme about a spectrum of curiosity, really a spiral that describes depths of attention.

He does a lot with etymology, which endears me to him, and he is the kind of fellow I very much wish I’d had an encounter decades ago; it would have changed and improved my life. If you’re not yet convinced of the need to part with some of your hard-earned cash for this man’s book, read this commencement address of his:

http://necmusic.edu/eric-booth-2012-commencement-speech 

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Healing the Traumatized Self

CONSCIOUSNESS, NEUROSCIENCE, TREATMENT

Norton Series on Interpersonal Neurobiology

Paul Frewen (Author), Ruth Lanius (Author)

With a Foreword by Bessel van der Kolk, With a Foreword by David Spiegel

A neurobiological explanation of self-awareness and the states of mind of severely traumatized people.

Cultivation of emotional awareness is difficult, even for those of us not afflicted by serious mental illness. This book discusses the neurobiology behind emotional states and presents exercises for developing self awareness. Topics include mood (both unipolar and bipolar), anxiety (particularly PTSD), and dissociative disorders.  Frewen and Lanius comprehensively review psychological and neurobiological research, and explain how to use this research to become aware of emotional states within both normal and psychopathological functioning. Therapists will be able to help survivors of trauma, mood disorders, anxiety disorders, and dissociative disorders develop emotional awareness. The book also includes case studies, detailed instructions for clinicians, and handouts ready for use in assessment/therapy with patients/clients.

BOOK DETAILS

  1. Hardcover
  2. Forthcoming July 2014
  3. ISBN 978-0-393-70551-5
  4. 6.1 × 9.3 in / 416 pages

http://books.wwnorton.com/books/Healing-the-Traumatized-Self/

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Healing Trauma

Peter Levine, author of “Waking The Tiger”, has a book/CD package called “Healing Trauma” which detail a number of exercises built on Eugene Gendlin’s “Focusing” theories of “felt sense” (Somatic Experiencing).

“Levine’s psycho-physiological trauma theory is informed by what ethologists, or biologists who specialize in studying animal behavior in the wild, call the immobility response, a survival enhancing fixed action pattern evolved in prey animals which is triggered by the perceived imminence of being killed by a predator.”

Levine talks on Track Nine of the CD about somatic collapse as a result of trauma or having been shamed; one wonders if there is a parallel to social or cultural collapse. He talks about the exercise in which the client begins to re-stack their vertebra to come back to an upright and vertical alignment. On the tenth track, he discusses immobility as the pretended death of the predator’s victim, frightened by the aggression of the predator and giving up one’s own to feign death. On the eleventh track, he talks about looking around, or re-orienting, after waking up and shaking off the energy of the feigned death, or a natural built-in neurological system that [echoing Booth] allows for interest, curiosity and exploration. “It’s also the antidote for the trauma response. The nervous system cannot both be exploratory, curious, searching, looking and be traumatized.”  The “trauma response” cannot co-exist with those activities. And the activities of exploration create an urge to contact others who are similarly searching.  “It’s a natural response because, when we are not in the traumatized lockdown, our natural response is to reach out and make contact, both with our natural environment and any individual that we have a relationship with.”

Healing Trauma – Peter A. Levine

Waking the Tiger | Professional Training For Mental Health Professionals & Post Traumatic Stress Disorder | Trauma Therapy Training

Peter A. Levine – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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Stop pretending that you don’t want whatever it is that you want, and take action. In every case, the remedy is to take action. Get clear about exactly what it is that you need to learn and exactly which you need to do to learn it. Getting clear kills fear.

Zen and The Art of Making a Living: A Practical Guide to Creative Career Design, Laurence G. Boldt, Arkana/Penguin Books, 1993. [Thick, thorough, penetrating, demanding: it will help you work through the issues of what your mission in life is, where to apply your talents, and how to accomplish the dreams and visions you have for your life in the world.]

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Imagining Healthy Work: Why We all Have to Become Monks

by JEFFREY BILBRO on MARCH 10, 2014 · 6 COMMENTS

I’m going to have to think on a small-scale, I’m going to have to think little.  If you leave here today remembering one thing, let it be this paradox: to include everything in our work, we have to work on a small, local scale. This is why we all have to become like monks.

I’m going to argue that if we want to work well, we should seek to work in a local community, for a common purpose, and at a variety of tasks.

http://www.frontporchrepublic.com/2014/03/imagining-healthy-work-become-monks/ 

A Way of Working

http://www.amazon.com/Way-Working-Spiritual-Dimension-Craft/dp/0930407016 

Laborare est orare.

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One’s true capacity for moving,

or being moved, can be achieved

only when one’s commitment to others

is in fact connected to and derived from

his primary commitment to himself. 

When we find this kind of alignment of purpose,

there is a harmony of motivation

that can provide the fuel and clarity

to overcome great obstacles

in the pursuit of great challenge.

from The Inner Game of Work, by W. Timothy Gallwey

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To stay on track is hard. You have to want it really hard, and you have to get better every year. Why are you doing what you do? Is it instinct? Belief? The way in which you are different? A caring about what you do? The opportunity to be of influence, to give a gift of beauty and happiness to someone? It is a heroic endeavor to come to task with the demands of your inner gift or talent. What is the choice if you choose not to meet these demands? There are many professions and pursuits that will allow you to be average. But mediocrity is not acceptable in the many careers where you are constantly measured against the best, when the comparisons to the titans of the past are inevitable. Pursuing your life’s work is a kind of agony, and you have to be careful not to love the agony, but to use it. In the end, you have to break out by yourself.

From “Juilliard”, an American Masters production on PBS

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Angels don’t produce art. Neither do beasts….

You and I do, in response to the pain of being human—without a credential and without the approval of anybody.

http://www.stevenpressfield.com/2014/04/can-writing-be-taught/?mc_cid=fc7c5c4314&mc_eid=430d290bc7 

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▶ Cinema Paradiso – Yo-Yo Ma and Chris Botti – YouTube (8:16)

Alfredo: Living here day by day, you think it’s the center of the world. You believe nothing will ever change. Then you leave: a year, two years. When you come back, everything’s changed. The thread’s broken. What you came to find isn’t there. What was yours is gone. You have to go away for a long time… many years… before you can come back and find your people. The land where you were born. But now, no. It’s not possible. Right now you’re blinder than I am.

Salvatore: Who said that? Gary Cooper? James Stewart? Henry Fonda? Eh?

Alfredo: No, Toto. Nobody said it. This time it’s all me. Life isn’t like in the movies. Life… is much harder.

 

 

▶ David Crosby featuring Mark Knopfler – What’s Broken (2014) – YouTube

▶ David Crosby – Holding On To Nothing – YouTube (3:40)

▶ David Crosby – Time I Have – YouTube (3:43)